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Showing papers in "Irish Theological Quarterly in 2016"






Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines the practical judgment called conscience that binds a person to do or not to do a particular action and concludes that the teaching that no one is to be forced to act contrary to her or his conscience is a long-standing Catholic moral tradition.
Abstract: This essay examines the practical judgment called conscience that binds a person to do or not to do a particular action. Drawing from the Wesleyan Quadrilateral, scripture, tradition, reason/science, and human experience, it focuses on the connection between communal human experience and conscience. It concludes that the teaching that no one is to be forced to act contrary to her or his conscience and that no one is to be restrained from acting according to her or his conscience is a long-standing Catholic moral tradition.

5 citations


Journal ArticleDOI

5 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Peter Brown1
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the attitudes to labour that were crystallized among the monks of two different regions of the Christian world in the late third and fourth centuries and consider the implications, in Western Christianity, of the victory of the commitment to labour associated with the monks in Egypt.
Abstract: This article examines the attitudes to labour that were crystallized among the monks of two different regions of the Christian world in the late third and fourth centuries. The monks of Syria opted against work. Along with the Manichaean Elect, they expected to be supported by the alms of the faithful. Work for them was inconsistent with the ‘angel-like’ life of the ascetic. This view was hotly contested by the monks of Egypt, who regarded labour as part of the duty of the monk and as the monk’s link to a common, non-angelic humanity. Having sketched out the social and ideological background of both options, the article considers the implications, in Western Christianity, of the victory of the commitment to labour associated with the monks of Egypt.

5 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Bates as mentioned in this paper argues that the psalmist was reporting in advance the actual words that would be spoken by Jesus in his future time of crisis as revealed to him long ago.
Abstract: in the New Testament, for instance, something which is not widely accepted within critical scholarship. His discussion of the words reportedly spoken by the divine voice at Jesus’ baptism is a case in point: ‘You are my Son the beloved, with you I am well pleased ...’ (Mk 1:11; Ps 2:7). For Bates, there is no suggestion that this allusion may have been added by the evangelist to make clear the significance of Jesus, as it is definitely to be taken as ‘... a speech within a speech that was originally spoken by the Son, who was reporting the words the Father had spoken to him at an earlier time ...’ (p. 64). Similarly, Bates cannot accept the references to the Psalms in the passion narratives as indicative of a typological reading of scripture, in which the early Christians understood Jesus’ sufferings as following the pattern of the righteous sufferer as exemplified by David. Rather, he argues the psalmist was reporting in advance the actual words that would be spoken by Jesus in his future time of crisis as revealed to him long ago. In short, Bates tackles an important question in an original way, bringing in relevant information from the Graeco-Roman context of the New Testament, but it seems to me that his approach will only be fully persuasive to those who share the strongly confessional stance which he outlines in his introduction.

4 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A collection of essays as discussed by the authors provides readers with a mature and extremely informative insight into Vatican II, its achievements, and the ongoing tasks that remain, as well as a reminder of the responsibility on all of us to fulfil its vision in an ever-changing Ireland.
Abstract: enriched and enlarged by their commitment and understanding, as well as sharing our own with them’ (p. 354). He notes also in this chapter the many ways in which women have contributed to the Church in the years following the Council. In particular one might think of the increasing numbers of lay women who are studying and teaching theology around the world. However, he also points to the ongoing exclusion of lay people, especially women, from any real governance within the Church, and how the talents they might bring to the task are therefore being ignored. This collection of essays provides readers with a mature and extremely informative insight into Vatican II, its achievements, and the ongoing tasks that remain. The range of contributors and their areas of expertise are impressive. This book captures the spirit of the Council and acts as a reminder of the responsibility on all of us to fulfil its vision in an ever-changing Ireland.

4 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The challenge for the Church today is to think about the specific place of women also in those places where the authority of the church is exercised for variou... as mentioned in this paper The challenge [for the Church] today is this: to consider the specific places of women and women's specific places in the world.
Abstract: Pope Francis has stated that ‘The challenge [for the church] today is this: to think about the specific place of women also in those places where the authority of the church is exercised for variou...



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors provide an evaluative review of major recent publications which treat this section of Hebrews, drawing out some common themes and recurring critical issues. But they do not address the issues raised in these studies, such as the author's use of the Old Testament and the religious and conceptual background to his thought.
Abstract: Chapters 3–4 have emerged as key to much recent scholarly interpretation of the epistle to the Hebrews. This paper offers an evaluative review of major recent publications which treat this section of Hebrews, drawing out some common themes and recurring critical issues. The questions addressed in these studies have significant implications for an understanding of Hebrews more widely, as they impact on judgements about subjects such as the letter’s structure and main message, the author’s use of the Old Testament, and the religious and conceptual background to his thought.


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Hammarskjold's Markings combines the spiritual, theological and ethical in four stages: context, translation, overalignment, and over-alignment as discussed by the authors, which is the first stage of the four stages.
Abstract: Hammarskjold’s Markings combines the spiritual, theological and ethical. This article engages with the journal in four stages. First, it briefly introduces the text (context, translation and overal...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors compare von Balthasar and Lonergan's approach to trinitarian theology and find that they can seem to be quite at odds in their approach, but there have been recent efforts to relate the two theologians favourably.
Abstract: Hans Urs von Balthasar and Bernard Lonergan can seem to be quite at odds in their approach to trinitarian theology. However, there have been recent efforts to relate the two theologians favourably....

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a contemporary approach to Christian atonement theology based on the liturgical background to New Testament understandings of the Cross and Resurrection is presented. But this approach offers an...
Abstract: This essay explores a contemporary approach to Christian atonement theology based on the liturgical background to New Testament understandings of the Cross and Resurrection. This approach offers an...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a list of books from my shelf for which I am particularly grateful include Dawn 1999, Best 2003, Block 2014, and Opstal 2016, along with some we regret purchasing in the first place.
Abstract: It is dizzying, keeping up with the publication of new books and resources on worship. Anyone who has been involved in planning, leading, studying, or teaching about the topic can attest to this. Very few of us can afford to purchase them all, much less read them all. We are forced to make choices. Most of us have shelves lined with volumes we cherish and from which we’ve benefited, along with some we regret purchasing in the first place. Books from my shelf for which I’m particularly grateful include Dawn 1999, Best 2003, Block 2014, and Opstal 2016.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The interpretation of the sursum corda given by David Fergusson of Dunfermline in 1563 is in fact derived from Oecolampadius, Farel and Calvin, and found articulation in Farel's 1533 liturgy for Neuchâtel and, pace Holmes as discussed by the authors, is found in Calvin's Genevan liturgy.
Abstract: theology was fond of Augustine, of course it used his idea of symbol and sign, and the words significare, signare and figurare are indeed used frequently. However, what is underplayed in this chapter is the fact that these terms are used very differently, and Reformed Augustinian theology is a far cry from Durandus. The assertion that the word enim in the institution narrative of the canon missae only dates from the 13th century is incorrect. The Reformers (Luther as well as Knox) attacked it as unscriptural when in fact as Edward Ratcliff demonstrated, it is scriptural—it is found in the Old Latin Version from which the narrative of the Romano-African canon missae is derived. The interpretation of the sursum corda given by David Fergusson of Dunfermline in 1563 is in fact derived from Oecolampadius, Farel and Calvin, and found articulation in Farel’s 1533 liturgy for Neuchâtel and, pace Holmes (p. 189 and note 72), is found in Calvin’s Genevan liturgy. Known amongst liturgical scholars as the ‘Reformed sursum corda,’ its form in the English Genevan Form of Prayers 1556, adopted for use in Scotland in 1562, reads as follows. ‘For the only way to dispose our souls to receive nourishment, relief and quickening of his substance, is to lift up our minds by faith above all things worldly and sensible, and thereby to enter into heaven, that we may find and receive Christ, where he dwelleth undoubtedly very God and very Man ...’ The continuity in Robert Bruce’s sermons is also unpersuasive. Holmes’s book brilliantly illustrates the work of the Catholic ‘Aberdeen Liturgists’ and witnesses both to the renaissance revival and the myth of a totally ignorant and corrupt clergy. The attempt to find so much continuity with the Scottish Reformed divines is, in this reviewer’s view, a bridge too far, and it simply glosses over the very obvious discontinuity in liturgical celebration, redecoration (iconoclastic!) of the inherited buildings, and of Reformed sacramental theology.




Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argued that the interpretation of the Second Vatican Council texts should attend not only to the intentions of the authors but also to the texts (and the history of their reception) and their readers.
Abstract: Before investigating whether the Second Vatican Council agreed that ‘other’ living faiths can in some sense prove ‘ways of salvation,’ we need to clarify what the interpretation of texts involves. This article appeals to literary critics, philosophers, biblical scholars, and legal experts in maintaining that the interpretation of the Council’s texts should attend not only to the intentions of the authors but also to the texts (and the history of their reception) and their readers. On the basis of this integral view of interpretation, one can argue that Lumen gentium, Nostra aetate, and Ad gentes imply that in some real sense other faiths offer ‘ways of revelation and salvation.’


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the intellectual relationship of Jean-Luc Marion to some of his theological and spiritual mentors in Montmartre during his student years in Paris and look at evidence of the relationship.
Abstract: This article explores the intellectual relationship of Jean-Luc Marion to some of his theological and spiritual mentors in Montmartre during his student years in Paris. It looks at evidence of thei...


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an overview of Lonergan's early psychological analogy of the Trinity with some proposed clarifications and developments is presented, including the Church's relationship with the Jews, Mariology, and Barth's Christology.
Abstract: This article presents an overview of Lonergan’s psychological analogy of the Trinity with some proposed clarifications and developments. By way of presentation, it introduces the readers to Lonergan’s early psychological analogy in his Triune God: Systematics in the context of contemporary theological reflection on the Trinity. Two developments are then presented, the first, following Robert Doran, is to develop the analogy as a proceeding Word of affirmation or God’s eternal Yes. Several examples are presented to show the provocative nature of this proposed development including the Church’s relationship with the Jews, Mariology, and Barth’s Christology. Second, I explore an interpretation proposed by Doran in order to reconcile the earlier analogy with Lonergan’s later analogy in light of Ignatian spiritual theology, therefore retaining the fittingness of both analogies. Finally, I propose a qualification of Doran’s fecund solution.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Demacopoulos as mentioned in this paper argues that the apex of the spiritual life was to be found in the sacrifice that corresponds to service for others, which is the starting point for the new synthesis of his life that Demacopoulos proposes.
Abstract: Demacopoulos suggests that his book sets itself apart from earlier works in two ways. ‘First, it situates Gregory’s ascetic commitments and the uniqueness of his ascetic theology as the baseline for his other theological investments. Second, it seeks to build upon the analysis of Gregory’s thought by seeking ways to understand how his theological commitments are revealed in his pastoral, administrative and diplomatic activities’ (p. 8). As an Orthodox scholar, Demacopoulos brings a new perspective to another dichotomy that marks the figure of Gregory both as a figure that is much revered by Orthodox Christians as a Father of the Church and as someone who contributed to giving the papacy its current shape, a shape that is not always appreciated by Orthodox Christians. In order to provide this new analysis of Gregory and to bind his asceticism and leadership together, Demacopoulos proposes how Gregory had a different understanding of asceticism to that of his contemporaries. Unlike, for example, Basil and Cassian, who saw the goal of the ascetic life as being ‘mystical union with God,’ for Gregory ‘the apex of the spiritual life was to be found in the sacrifice that corresponds to service for others’ (p. 28). This new understanding of the sacrificial dimension of service, whereby Gregory sacrifices the mystical fruits of contemplation in order to serve his fellow Christians and citizens of Rome, provides the starting point for the new synthesis of his life that Demacopoulos proposes. The book is methodically divided into three parts dealing with Gregory as an ascetic theologian, as a pastoral theologian and as the ‘first man’ of Rome, thus passing from his original vocation as a monk, then as a bishop who had the care of souls, to his role as a civic figure in the city of Rome, often caught between various political interests of the Roman Emperor, now living in Constantinople, and the new ‘Barbarian’ rulers in what was to become Western Europe. Demacopoulos writes in a very readable style and makes abundant use of the different primary sources that we possess from Gregory. I enjoyed his perspective and insights. However, this book was not written as a general introduction to the figure of Gregory and is aimed at a somewhat more specialized audience. Therefore it would not be the first book that I would recommend to introduce a newcomer to Gregory (for this I would recommend starting with Robert Markus’s 1997 Gregory the Great and his World or with an annotated selection of his writings, such as John Moorhead’s 2005 Gregory the Great). Nevertheless, it is a great addition to any theological or historical library and provides a fascinating insight into the person of Gregory and the world he inhabited for anyone who is interested in getting to know him better.