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JournalISSN: 1013-8471

Journal for Semitics 

UNISA Press
About: Journal for Semitics is an academic journal published by UNISA Press. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Hebrew & Narrative. It has an ISSN identifier of 1013-8471. Over the lifetime, 364 publications have been published receiving 929 citations. The journal is also known as: Tydskrif vir semitistiek & JSem.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors compare Pentateuchal material from the MT and Qumran, concluding that preservation of diachronically meaningful detail is still very much the norm, and differences between editions of the Torah often indicate the linguistic conservatism of one edition, here the MT, as opposed to linguistic development of the other, here QUMran material.
Abstract: The accepted ancient Hebrew diachronic paradigm and the standard linguistic approach for the periodisation of biblical texts are today heavily criticised, the criticism most recently centring on the textual situation of the sources. Critics argue that the high degree of textual instability and linguistic fluidity characterising the extant witnesses preclude any reliable tracing of the history of the language and make even the most approximative attempts at linguistic dating impossible. However, much of this textual argument is abstract, since the effect of secondary intervention on the stability of diachronically significant features has been studied in detail in the case of only a few texts, the investigations reaching conflicting conclusions. After a brief survey of foregoing investigations, the present study compares Pentateuchal material from the MT and Qumran, concluding that (a) preservation of diachronically meaningful detail is still very much the norm, and (b) differences between editions of the Torah often indicate the linguistic conservatism of one edition, here the MT, as opposed to linguistic development of the other, here the Qumran material.

30 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors surveys salient manifestations of niphalisation in Samaritan Hebrew, contrasting them with parallel features in Tiberian Hebrew and other forms of ancient Hebrew and Aramaic, especially Second Temple varieties, and seeks to reveal salient commonalities.
Abstract: A development in verbal morphology common to multiple forms of ancient Hebrew involves the shift of stative, intransitive, and weakly transitive verbs from G-stem (qal) to N-stem (niphal). Like other Hebrew traditions that crystallised in the Second Temple period, the reading tradition of the Samaritan Pentateuch (consisting of the oral realisation of the constituent consonantal, vocalic, and prosodic components) presents a relatively advanced stage of the shift. Against this tendency, however, Samaritan Hebrew also at times appears to preserve archaic qal morphology. This study surveys salient manifestations of “niphalisation” in Samaritan Hebrew, contrasting them with parallel features in Tiberian Hebrew and other forms of ancient Hebrew and Aramaic, especially Second Temple varieties, and seeks to reveal salient commonalities. While highlighting pertinent secondary features common to Second Temple period sources, the paper also emphasises the historical depth of the shift from qal to niphal.

21 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the meaning and importance of the prophet Jeremiah 13:23 critically and argued that one of the greatest prophets of ancient Israel, having been familiar with the military might, wisdom and vastness of their African territories does not despise black African people but uses them as standards against which to evaluate Israel in Jeremiah 13,23 as did other biblical passages.
Abstract: This paper examines the meaning and importance of Jeremiah 13:23 critically. The author argues that one of the greatest prophets of ancient Israel, having been familiar with the military might, wisdom and vastness of their African territories does not despise black African people but uses them as standards against which to evaluate Israel in Jeremiah 13:23 as did other biblical passages (Amos 9:7; Is 17:3, 11-15; 30:1-2; 31:1-3; 45:14; Ez 27:7; Dn 11:43). The reasons for using black people and nations as standards against which to evaluate Israel are: first, their vast territories, great military might and power, wealth and wisdom (Is 19:5, 11-15; Is 45:14; Ez 27:7; Dn 11:43); second, it makes their high esteem to be boosted when these nations are cited as paradigmatic. The central theological message of Jeremiah 13:23 is to address the question of Judah's habituation of sin which leads to slavery that is irredeemable. Judah has an indelible stain and "her evil habits held her fast like bands of steel". The various English translations of Jeremiah 13:23 in different English versions of the Bible are misleading and therefore a disservice to the black race all over the world. The proper translation according to this author should have been: "Would Black Africans change their skin or the leopards their sports? So also you who have learnt to do evil could do evil."

15 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this paper, a comparative survey of the books of LXX Esther, Judith and Susanna is presented, focusing on the similarities between the narratives of these three women, as well as exploring some possible origins for the basic narrative pattern from which these might have mutated.
Abstract: This study provides a comparative survey of the books of LXX Esther, Judith and Susanna. It utilizes primarily narrative criticism, keeping in mind that the narratives should be examined as literature, investigating each narrative as a whole. It is hoped that in this comparative investigation we will arrive at a better understanding of the extent of the similarities between the narratives of these three women, as well as exploring some possible origins for the basic narrative pattern (some “master narrative”) from which these might have mutated. The concept of these characters as the main protagonists is challenged with the suspicion that we still encounter here male-dominated stories in which these women are possibly portrayed merely as role models of submission, obedience and self-sacrifice.

15 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors compare the Maccabean literature and Hebrews with each other in order to present a brief synopsis of a few selected motifs, including the Abrahamic promise and the Aqedah, priests with royal functions, faith heroes and endurance, instruction of the Scriptures, and the Canticum Mosis.
Abstract: Several common motifs and linguistic similarities between the books of the Maccabees and the book of Hebrews were noted in the past by scholars in random remarks and ad hoc statements. These relations and similarities deserve further investigation. It is therefore the intention of this paper to compare the Maccabean literature and Hebrews with each other in order to present a brief synopsis of a few selected motifs. Some prominent common motifs that will receive attention include the Abrahamic promise and the Aqedah, priests with royal functions, faith heroes and endurance, instruction of the Scriptures, and the Canticum Mosis. It is hoped that this comparison of common motifs will result in first a closer understanding of whether the unknown author of Hebrews was familiar with the books of the Maccabees, and secondly a better understanding of the provenance of Hebrews in particular

13 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202316
202231
20211
20202
20199
201813