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JournalISSN: 2225-8973

Journal of Academic Writing 

Coventry University, Lanchester Library
About: Journal of Academic Writing is an academic journal published by Coventry University, Lanchester Library. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Academic writing & Higher education. It has an ISSN identifier of 2225-8973. Over the lifetime, 209 publications have been published receiving 815 citations.

Papers published on a yearly basis

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article identified the title conventions of eight disciplines by focusing on various features that play a part in title design: the use of multiple-unit titles, noun phrases to form the title, and "a" or "the" in initial position.
Abstract: Research articles are clearly influenced by the discipline of the research being reported. Just as disciplinary conventions place constraints on, for example, the moves and language use of abstracts and introductions, they also provide a set of options for title design. This study attempts to identify the title conventions of eight disciplines by focusing on various features that play a part in title design: the use of multiple-unit titles (those with subtitles); the use of noun phrases to form the title; and ’a’ or ’the’ in initial position. The length of titles is investigated, as is the proportion of substantive words. Data is based on a 3,200-title corpus of titles from research articles published in prestigious journals in four disciplines in the hard sciences (botany, fluid engineering, geology, and medicine) and four in the soft sciences (economics, education, history, and sociology). The data is presented in a visual form that compares title features by discipline, to demonstrate title conventions and to help novice writers understand the features and options available.

33 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Olga Dysthe1
TL;DR: In this paper, a qualitative case study of feedback practices in the first year of a two-year master's program is presented, where a discrepancy between the considerable amount of comments given by the teachers and the students' lack of use of the feedback they received is identified.
Abstract: This article presents a qualitative case study of feedback practices in the first year of a two-year master's programme. Writing and feedback are viewed as contextualized cultural practices shaped by factors at macro, meso and micro level. The empirical data consists of a text corpus of students’ essays and teachers’ comments, supplemented by interviews. Initial findings showed a discrepancy between the considerable amount of comments given by the teachers and the students’ lack of use of the feedback they received. The text analysis, based primarily on Hattie and Timperley’s (2007) model of feedback revealed several features of the feedback that counteracted learning, but a major problem was unclear goals for the writing combined with a study design that did not include revision of student texts.

25 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explored the potential of audio-visual screencasting for assignment feedback on a distance learning (DL) course and found that feedback is received more positively in the richer media of audiovisual screencasts and that this may encourage emotions more conducive to receiving and processing feedback and help to socialise students within the learning context by giving them a sense of belonging to the community.
Abstract: This action research explored the potential of audio-visual screencasting for assignment feedback on a distance learning (DL) course. A screencast is a combination of voice recording and screen capture, which can be played in any browser, like a video. Here it is used to capture a tutor’s editing and highlighting activities in a document, whilst simultaneously recording spoken feedback. Research suggests that audio-visual feedback may resolve some of the current problems with written feedback. A pilot study is reported which trialled screencasting for essay feedback on a master's level DL module at Sheffield Hallam University. Fourteen students participated and were randomly divided between two groups to receive either written or screencast feedback first. After receiving the first feedback type, students completed a short questionnaire online. The second type of feedback was then distributed to the students, who completed the same questionnaire for the second type of feedback. The results suggest that feedback is received more positively in the richer media of audio-visual screencasting and that this may encourage emotions more conducive to receiving and processing feedback and help to socialise students within the learning context by giving them a sense of belonging to the community. Simultaneous visual cues and explanations appear to help with understanding, and it is quicker to capture screencasts than it is to write feedback. However, preferences for written feedback were related to the holistic overview of a document, which could be scanned and revisited, and which was not confined to a linear delivery, nor time-limited. Audio-visual screencasting will therefore only be adopted for formative feedback during modules, and will be structured with spoken overviews.

24 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a focus on plagiarism built into the first month of a core, year one accountancy module at the University of Huddersfield in England is considered, where students learn about why we should not plagiarise and are encouraged to explain their own understanding of plagiarism.
Abstract: This paper considers a focus on plagiarism built into the first month of a core, year one accountancy module at the University of Huddersfield in England In designing the approach to plagiarism education a consideration of learning theories, particularly learning styles and social constructivism, helped in reaching the conclusion that some students may need to experience plagiarism in order to appreciate what it constitutes As a result, students write an early formative essay on which they receive feedback, mainly but not exclusively, on referencing and plagiarism As part of this process students learn about why we should not plagiarise and are encouraged to explain their own understanding of plagiarism A survey completed by the students following the first month of study indicates that many did not share the institution’s understanding of plagiarism prior to entering university and that many had subsequently changed their understanding

19 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202211
202114
202026
201911
201841
20176