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JournalISSN: 1757-1936

Journal of Arts & Communities 

Intellect
About: Journal of Arts & Communities is an academic journal published by Intellect. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): The arts & Arts in education. It has an ISSN identifier of 1757-1936. Over the lifetime, 119 publications have been published receiving 487 citations. The journal is also known as: Journal of arts and communities.

Papers published on a yearly basis

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A qualitative evaluation of the thirty-week workshop series of the singing-based participatory arts initiative Sweet Tonic is presented in this paper, where the authors argue that the most power- ful evidence of the impact of a program like SIT is contained in the accounts of personal experience of participants in the programme.
Abstract: Tonic is a singing-based participatory arts initiative based in the south- west of Sydney, Australia. This paper reports on a qualitative evaluation of the thirty-week workshop series. It provides qualitative evidence of the outcomes of the programme, linking these to recent debates about 'evidence-based policy' approaches. It argues that, although Sweet Tonic is undoubtedly a beneficiary of the instrumentalist turn in arts policy, this framing also traps the programme into defining its success or failure in instrumentalist terms. It is suggested that, although such accounts are often dismissed as 'anecdotal', in fact the most power- ful evidence of the impact of a programme like Sweet Tonic is contained in the accounts of personal experience of participants in the programme. It is therefore necessary to understand the complexities of evidence in cultural policy, and to develop new language to talk about evidence that doesn't unnecessarily privilege quantitative or statistical forms at the expense of qualitative evidence.

52 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a post-disciplinary poetics that interweaves a multiplicity of 'creative' and'scientific' material to enact, in the socio-geographical domain, John Wylie's understanding that landscape is tension is presented as offering a multidimensional understanding of place that enacts these tensions.
Abstract: This article sets out an understanding of the emergent practices collectively referred to as `deep mapping'. It adopts Mike Pearson's view that the optimal deep mapping takes `region as its optic' (2006), while also recognizing the value of smaller-scale approaches. It draws on Kenneth Frampton's Critical Regionalism to underpin deep mapping's environmental and social dimensions and provide a productive counterpoint to its ethno-autographic element and its focus on a `militant particularism' able to facilitate `the passage from memory to hope, from past to future' (Harvey 1996). Critical Regionalism is taken here as a `post-disciplinary' poetics that interweaves a multiplicity of `creative' and `scientific' material to enact, in the socio-geographical domain, John Wylie's understanding that `landscape is tension' (2007). Deep mapping is presented as offering a multidimensional understanding of place that enacts these tensions through our engagement with a second, specifically cultural, space-between, understood here as a metaxy. It is only in this space that we are able to put into practice Geraldine Finn's insight that, while we cannot do without categorical thinking, `we are always both more and less than the categories that name and divide us' (1996). The argument put forward here locates this active social space between the institutional worlds of art and of the university as that with which deep mapping specifically engages as a discrete practice. It posits that an `open' deep mapping draws on the resources `managed' by each institutional world so as to maintain a critical solicitude towards both professional worlds while remaining non-aligned with the presuppositions of either.

17 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a co-produced transdisciplinary arts and language practice and research project with refugees and people seeking asylum is described, which explores what it means to be "welcome", how we welcome, and how we want to be 'welcomed'.
Abstract: In this article we draw on data from a co-produced transdisciplinary arts and language practice and research project. In this project, researchers, artists and creative practitioners worked with refugees and people seeking asylum. Together we developed and led arts-based workshops, which aimed to explore what it means to be ‘welcome’, how we ‘welcome’ and how we want to be ‘welcomed’. As researchers we approached the project from different disciplinary spaces: Sam from applied theatre and Jessica from sociolinguistics and linguistic ethnography. Through analysis of our co-produced artistic outputs, through ethnographic writing and through our reflections on the processes of collaborating, we consider how arts practices engage with narratives of migration in refugee communities. We take three elements of the project: visual arts products in the form of silk paintings, community voices in the form of vignettes and media documentation in the form of a project film. We suggest how these examples embody the processes and the community developed around the project and the different ways of working across sectors with displaced communities to engage with and enable spaces for voices to be made audible. We use ‘refugee’ throughout this article to refer to people who have been granted asylum, people who are in the process of granting asylum, and people whose asylum claims have been rejected. We choose not to use the phrase ‘asylum seekers’ due to its often negative connotations in the British press.

16 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors consider some of the methodological issues faced by a team working in the emerging field of participatory arts and health research and argue that, in order to optimize research rigour, there is a need to address four fundamental issues.
Abstract: This article considers some of the methodological issues faced by a team working in the emerging field of participatory arts and health research. It argues that, in order to optimize research rigour, there is a need to address four fundamental issues. First, researchers should define the scope of the art(s) under study (in terms of domain, level of participation and potential impact); second, they should adopt a concept of health appropriate for the target sample group; third, the research method should be consistent with the extent and type of evidence already existing in the area and that to be sought; and finally, there is a need to select a means of data collection and communication that accurately represents both the outcomes/impacts of arts interventions and the experiences of research subjects, which may not be reducible to the language conventionally used in research. The issues are illustrated with an account of one research project being undertaken by the team.

16 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202212
20218
202017
20173
20165
20159