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Showing papers in "Journal of Asean Studies in 2017"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine how ASEAN Socio-Culture Community (ASCC), alongside CSO's within them, will work in creating closer relations among AseAN countries, in order to solve disputes in the region.
Abstract: In the end of 2015, ASEAN Community will be fully implemented in Southeast Asia. The community will bring ASEAN countries to the next stage of cooperation in order to bring prosperity to the region. However, several obstacles still have to be faced by ASEAN. Territorial dispute between Indonesia and Malaysia, Thailand and Cambodia concerning Preah Temple, Malaysia with The Phillipines over Sabah, etc are some of the problems. Other problems related to South China Sea, even involving five ASEAN members on dispute. Although it is clear that member of ASEAN countries agree to settle their problems according to ASEAN mechanism as the most respective organization in the region, on several occasions they prefer to take it bilaterally or bring it to the Hague. The assumption of non-interference principle as the organization conflict solving mechanism does not apply accordingly. As such, we have to find other ways. Peace can only be achieved through closer relations between ASEAN countries. Closer relation creates better understanding between people within those countries. If “high level” (G to G) conflict resolution does not work, we have to turn to the people. Closer relations among its people will be a “grass root’ power to force the government to end their dispute. This paper will examine how ASEAN Socio-Culture Community (ASCC), alongside CSO’s within them, will work in creating closer relations among ASEAN countries, in order to solve disputes in the region. Key words: ASEAN Community, ASEAN Socio-Culture Community, Dispute, Civil Society Organizations (CSO).

6 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: ASEAN was a regional initiative that came out of the Bangkok talks to end Confrontation, Western governments had been formulating regional cooperation policies in Southeast Asia decades prior as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Policy objectives for Southeast Asian regionalism had been evolving since the end of the Second World War. Economic development viewed as essential for establishing peace and stability in Southeast Asia and the links between development and security were evident in the elaboration of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). Also evident was the second-line support provided by external powers. While ASEAN was a regional initiative that came out of the Bangkok talks to end Confrontation, Western governments had been formulating regional cooperation policies in Southeast Asia decades prior. Economic development viewed as essential for containing communist influence and preventing internal insurgencies in the region. Growth and prosperity would come through regional development programs with external support. This would then expand to some form of collective security led by the Southeast Asian nations themselves. Regionalism viewed as one way of providing economic assistance to newly independent nations without the appearance of foreign interference in regional affairs. Therefore, the evolution of Southeast Asian regionalism was a combined effort of foreign power support for Asian initiatives throughout the economic development with the aim to provide security during the political transformation of the region from the post-war period into the early years of ASEAN and the aftermath of the war in Vietnam.

5 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the role of AUN in enhancing regional integration in the higher education sector in ASEAN has been discussed, where the authors used qualitative method to get depth information and the bigger picture in the governance of aUN role and mechanism in regional integration of higher education system.
Abstract: Higher education has an important role in the region’s economic growth, with talents and ideas developing in the process. ASEAN University Network (AUN) is the institution that facilitates cooperation among ASEAN universities and beyond. This research attempts to describe the role of AUN in enhancing regional integration in the higher education sector in ASEAN. This research uses qualitative method to get depth information and the bigger picture in the governance of AUN’s role and mechanism in regional integration of higher education system. The results of this research showed that AUN helped enhancing regional cooperation.

4 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a combination between formal diplomacy actions done by state institution and informal diplomacy actions by non-government actors is proposed to promote political awareness on the future of SEA community.
Abstract: This paper endeavors to review the inter-state relation in Southeast Asia countries. Especially in government policy. The most significant problem in regional relationship is about the absence of political awareness. As a consequence, ASEAN only provides limited positive achievement in political performance regionally. This article provides an alternative explanation for the limited achievement in political performance of ASEAN by assessing the implication of using non-interference principe to the incidence of ignorance and disconnection between ASEAN countries that leads to lack of political awareness. In this paper, we try to propose a combination between formal diplomacy actions done by state institution and informal diplomacy actions done by non-government actors. We also points out an alternative strategy to promote political awareness on the future of SEA community. First, open policy to connecting diplomatic based community. Second, optimalize the regional cooperation with more concern with democracy and human rights issue. Third, building and institutionalizing political awareness through people participation. Keywords: regional cooperation, non-interference principal, political awareness, comunitarian

3 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The security environment in East Asia has continuously evolved, particularly, China's maritime expansion and the DPRK's provocative behavior as mentioned in this paper, and Japan, with its military being limited by its Peace Constitution, has been steadily shifting its defense policy to respond to its strategic environment for the past three prime ministers: Naoto Kan, Yoshihiko Noda, and Shinzo Abe.
Abstract: The security environment in East Asia has continuously evolved, particularly, China’s maritime expansion and DPRK’s provocative behavior. Japan, with its military being limited by its Peace Constitution, has been steadily shifting its defense policy to respond to its strategic environment for the past three of its Prime Ministers: Naoto Kan, Yoshihiko Noda, and Shinzo Abe. Historical enmities, military capability, as well as territorial disputes have increased the threats of Japan’s neighbors to Tokyo’s national security. Since 2010, Japan has established a National Defense Program Guideline (NDPG), shifted its defense strategy from the Basic Defence Force (kibanteki boei ryoko) to Dynamic Defense Force (doeki boei ryoko), revised its Three Principles on Arms Exports, created the National Security Council (NSC), the National Security Strategy (NSS), and the Medium Term Defense Program (MDTP), and revised its article 9 of its Peace Constitution. While the NSC, NSS, MDTP, and article 9 are under the Abe administration, the claim that the steps Abe have undertaken to be revolutionary is in fact, a continuity from his predecessors despite coming from opposing political backgrounds. Despite of several significant changes in its defense policy, Japan still abides to its Constitution and its military is still limited.

1 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Mutti Anggitta1
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the potential future of nuclear security in Southeast Asia by examining the roles of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in establishing and maintaining regional cooperation on nuclear security.
Abstract: The objective of this essay is to discuss the potential future of nuclear security in Southeast Asia by examining the roles of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in establishing and maintaining regional cooperation on nuclear security. This essay will first outline nuclear renaissance and security challenges in the region. It will then discuss the steps that have been taken and could be taken by ASEAN to lead the region to a safer nuclear security future.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors analyse the two essential factors of intra-regional trade and economic community in Southeast Asia, and find that private sector is ready towards the economic community therefore the ASEAN Economic Community is fit for the recent Southeast Asia integration.
Abstract: Shifting from intra-regional trade to that of investment is the major aim of the economic integration of Southeast Asia. This article attempts to analyse the two essential factors of it, one is intra-regional trade and two is economic community. For the first analysis it selects Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand as the observed countries and for the second analysis it takes Indonesia as the field study. Firstly, this article finds that free trade agreement is effective to increases intra-regional trade but ineffective to attract investment therefore Southeast Asia needs to amplify its open-regionalism principle. Secondly, it finds that private sector is ready towards the economic community therefore the ASEAN Economic Community is fit for the recent Southeast Asia’s integration.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Hameiri and Jones as discussed by the authors argue that the emergence of non-traditional security issues requires new modes of governance, instead of a simple extension of the logic of war suggested by the Copenhagen School or new responses of post-national governance.
Abstract: The nature of security issues has changed significantly in recent decades. They are no longer just about war, but have extended into complex and transnational security issues or so-called Non-Traditional Security (NTS). Shahar Hameiri and Lee Jones in their new book Governing Borderless Threats, argue therefore that the emergence of NTS issues requires new modes of governance, instead of a simple extension of the logic of war suggested by the Copenhagen School or new responses of post-national governance.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the problems and issues of China's relations with ASEAN, which has achieved the establishment of a SEAN Economic Community by 2015, were investigated. But, the authors did not consider the impact of increasing economic interdependence between the two countries on the development of China-ASEAN relations.
Abstract: This paper aims to study the problems and issues of China's relations with ASEAN, which has achieved the establishment of ASEAN Economic Community by 2015. Taking into consideration the institutional framework constituted by the multiple agreements signed between China and ASEAN, how will the development of China-ASEAN relations be influenced by increasing economic interdependence between the two? What will be the difficulties ahead in enhancing trade and investments? Does promoting economic cooperation lead to more mutual trust in the political-strategic arena? China's recent policy in developing "one belt, one road", and Chinese relations to the US-led Trans-Pacific Partnership and their implications to ASEAN will also be examined in this paper.