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Showing papers in "Journal of Biological Research in 2011"


Journal Article
TL;DR: Stelios KATSANEVAKIS, Dimitrios POURSANIDIS, Vesna MACIC5, Sajmir BEQIRAJ, Lefter KASHTA, Yassine Ramzi SGHAIER, Rym ZAKHAMA-SRAIEB, Paolo MAGNI, Carlo Nike BIANCHI15, Louis TSIAKKIROS16 and Argyro ZENETOS.
Abstract: Stelios KATSANEVAKIS1*, Dimitrios POURSANIDIS2,3, Mehmet Baki YOKES4, Vesna MACIC5, Sajmir BEQIRAJ6, Lefter KASHTA7, Yassine Ramzi SGHAIER8,9, Rym ZAKHAMA-SRAIEB8, Ibrahem BENAMER10, Ghazi BITAR11, Zoheir BOUZAZA12, Paolo MAGNI13,14, Carlo Nike BIANCHI15, Louis TSIAKKIROS16 and Argyro ZENETOS1 1 Institute of Marine Biological Resources, Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, Anavyssos 19013, Greece 2 WWF, Hellas, Ethnikis Antistaseos 82, Heraklion 71601, Crete, Greece 3 Department of Marine Sciences, University of the Aegean, Mytilene, 81100, Greece 4 Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Halic University, 34384, Istanbul, Turkey 5 Institute of Marine Biology, Kotor, Montenegro 6 Biology Department, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Tirana, Bulevardi Zog I, Tirana, Albania 7 Research Center for Flora and Fauna, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Tirana, Bulevardi Zog I, Tirana, Albania 8 Research Unit of Animal Biology and Systematic Evolutionary, Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 Manar II, Tunisia 9 Regional Activity Centre for Specially Protected Areas (RAC/SPA), Boulevard du Leader Yasser Arafat, BP 337, 1080 Tunis Cedex, Tunisia 10 Faculty of Natural Resources and Environmental Science, University of Omar Mukhtar (OMU), Libya 11 Lebanese University, Faculty of Sciences (Section I), Department of Biology, Hadath, Beirut, Lebanon 12 Departement des Ressources Halieutiques, Faculte des Sciences Exactes, de la Nature et de la Vie, Universite Abelhamid Ibn Badis-Mostaganem, BP 300 rue Hocine Hamadou, 27000, Mostaganem, Algerie 13 National Research Council, Institute for Coastal Marine Environment (CNR-IAMC), Torregrande, 09072 Oristano, Italy 14 National Research Council, Institute of Marine Sciences (CNR-ISMAR), Arsenale di Venezia, Tesa 104, 30122 Venezia, Italy 15 DipTeRis (Dipartimento per lo studio del Territorio e della sue Risorse), University of Genoa, Corso Europa 26, 16132 Genova, Italy 16 4, Michael Koutsofta, Mesa Yitonia, 4000, Limassol, Cyprus

57 citations


Journal Article
TL;DR: Morphological as well as molecular data clearly support the monophyly of Siluriformes and place the main burst of their diversification at the late Cretaceous-early Tertiary boundary.
Abstract: The order Siluriformes, known as catfishes, constitutes an exceptionally diverse and speciose natural group of primarily freshwater ray-finned fishes (Nelson, 1994). Currently, 36 families and over 3000 species are recognized (Ferraris, 2007) rendering catfishes among the most diverse vertebrate orders (approximately 1 in 10 actinopterygians or 1 in 20 vertebrates is a catfish). Morphological (Fink & Fink, 1981) as well as molecular data (Saitoh et al., 2003; Sullivan et al., 2006) clearly support the monophyly of Siluriformes and place the main burst of their diversification at the late Cretaceous-early Tertiary boundary (Hardman, 2005). Despite the diversity of catfishes, interfamilial relationships still remain controversial and not fully resolved. Phylogenetic investigations have been stymied by the relative lack of dense sampling for certain mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data. For example, complete mitochondrial genomes have been determined for only six siluriform species, namely Pseudobagrus tokiensis (Saitoh et al., 2003), Corydoras rabauti (Saitoh et al., 2003), Ictalurus punctatus (Waldbieser et al., 2003), Cranoglanis bouderius (Peng et al., 2006), Pangasianodon gigas (Jondeung et al., 2007), and Liobagrus obesus (Kartavtsev et al., 2007). The European catfish Silurus glanis (Siluridae) is the second largest freshwater fish in Europe after the European sturgeon (Kottelat & Freyhof, 2007). Its natural distribution extends from the Aral Sea basin to the Danube and Vistula River basins, and southward to Greece and western Anatolia (Banarescu, 1989). The wels catfish (S. glanis) is of considerable commercial importance, particularly for central and eastern European countries, due to several characteristics that make it desirable for profitable aquaculture (Legendre et al., 1996; Proteau et al., 1996; Smitherman et al., 1996; Brzuska & Adamek, 1999). Few studies exist on the genetic variability and phylogeography of S. glanis populations (Krieg et al., 1999; Triantafyllidis et al., 1999a, b, 2002). Throughout the The mitochondrial genome of the European catfish Silurus glanis (Siluriformes, Siluridae)

19 citations


Journal Article
TL;DR: The diet of the short-toed eagle was studied in the Dadia-Lefkimi-Soufli National Park in northeastern Greece during the breeding seasons of 1996-98 to record the prey size and type, the feeding behaviour and the prey delivery rate.
Abstract: The diet of the short-toed eagle (Circaetus gallicus) was studied in the Dadia-Lefkimi-Soufli National Park in northeastern Greece during the breeding seasons of 1996-98. From 167 pellets analysed, 236 prey items were identified. Snakes (84.3%) were the main prey of adult eagle diet, followed by rodents (5.6%), lizards (4.2%), tortoises (3.8%) and other miscellaneous prey items. Grass snakes and large whip snakes comprised over 80% of the snakes. Four nests were monitored during the brooding period to record the prey size and type, the feeding behaviour and the prey delivery rate. The male provided most of the food, whereas the female cared for the young by brooding, shading and feeding. Colubrids comprised the principal prey brought to the nests, both in terms of frequency of occurrence (79.3%) and biomass (88.9%). Most snakes and European glass lizards brought to the nests measured between 60 and 120 cm in length. Both nestling and adult birds showed a narrow dietary breadth. Although there were no differences among the seven 10-day stages of young growth, neither in the prey delivery rate (mean: 1.13 prey item day –1 ), nor in the prey biomass delivered per day (mean: 211.3 g day –1 ), there was, however, a significant variation in the daily food biomass consumed by the nestling over the brooding period (mean: 174.8 g day –1 ). The daily prey delivery rate was unimodal in frequency, peaking between 09:00 and 12:00, and was synchronised with the diurnal activity pattern of reptiles which constituted the bulk of the short-toed eagle diet.

11 citations


Journal Article
TL;DR: Current data support the hypothesis that neoplastic cells derive from the clonal expansion of a single (somatic epithelial) stem cell or de-differentiated epithelial tumorigenous cells with newly acquired self-renewal capacity, and the hypotheses that decreased function or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, activation of oncogenes, modifications of intracellular molecular pathways cause dysregulation and switching towards a neoplasia.
Abstract: Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck (SCCHN) represents the sixth most common cancer and may involve the oral cavity (OSCC) as well as the larynx and pharynx, resulting in high mortality (5year survival rate is approximately 50%) despite molecular and therapeutical advances (Parkin et al., 2005). Although genetic predisposition, tobacco, alcohol, betel nuts use and Human Papilloma Viruses (HPV) infection are well recognized risk factors, the lack of established markers for early detection of OSCC in precancerous dysplastic lesions and the limited response to chemotherapy does not allow improvement of overall prognosis (Bagan & Scully, 2008). In fact, the mapping of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the malignant progression of OSCC is incomplete (Kim & Califano, 2004) and the exact turning point for the oral epithelium remains to be clarified. Current data support the hypothesis that neoplastic cells derive from the clonal expansion of a single (somatic epithelial) stem cell or de-differentiated epithelial tumorigenous cells with newly acquired self-renewal capacity (Lobo et al., 2007). The accumulated genetic and epigenetic alterations (i.e. decreased function or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, activation of oncogenes, modifications of intracellular molecular pathways) and the abnormal influence of growth factors in the cell cycle cause dysregulation and switching towards a neoplastic cell phe— REVIEW ARTICLE —

4 citations


Journal Article
TL;DR: The urgent need for a comprehensive study on the status of the Italian malacofauna, from a conservation perspective, cannot be underestimated, and the finding of a living population of Panopea glycimeris along eastern Sicily coasts is reported.
Abstract: There is little knowledge of the biology and ecology of most Mediterranean mollusk species; in many cases, their distribution in the Mediterranean Sea is also unknown, thus making the planning of their conservation particularly difficult (Scotti & Chemello, 2000; Bedulli et al., 2002). Only 14 species are included in the “Bern Convention” or the “Habitat Directive” lists. At present, there are no Mediterranean mollusks included in the CITES documents and no marine protected areas have been established to protect endangered or endemic mollusk species. The list of species in need of protection could easily include at least the few locally endemics (or those with very restricted range) and the so-called “rare species”, whose life cycles make them especially vulnerable (Scotti & Chemello, 2000; Bedulli et al., 2002; Oliverio, 2003; Templado et al., 2004). The urgent need for a comprehensive study on the status of the Italian malacofauna, from a conservation perspective, cannot be underestimated. In this respect, the finding of a living population of Panopea glycimeris (Bivalvia, Hiatellidae) along eastern Sicily coasts is reported.

4 citations


Journal Article
TL;DR: In Cyprus facilitation is not the dominant process in the regeneration of J. excelsa, and it seems that in many cases competition is the dominant force that determines the regeneration process of the species.
Abstract: The present study was conducted in four locations in Cyprus. These areas are included in a broad study area of approximately 6200 ha. The majority of this area belongs to the Natura 2000 Network and a small part of this area is a designated Nature Reserve. In order to determine whether facilitation is the dominant process in the regeneration of the Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb. stands in Cyprus, 120 plots of 100 m 2 (10 m × 10 m) were established in eight site types. In each plot the regeneration plants were graded in categories, according to their location in relation to J. excelsa trees. In four of the eight site types, that were distinguished, the density of the J. excelsa seedlings in open areas was higher than the density of the regeneration plants that have been established under the facilitation of adult trees of the species. In the remaining site types, a statistically significant difference was not recorded. In Cyprus facilitation is not the dominant process in the regeneration of J. excelsa. On the contrary, it seems that in many cases competition is the dominant force that determines the regeneration process of the species. The J. excelsa formations exhibit adequate recruitment, but in the future, the presence of J. excelsa in Cyprus will gradually be reduced in better sites, since it will be replaced by more competitive species having greater site sensitivity.

3 citations


Journal Article
TL;DR: The efficacy of selective absorption of hair chromophores from lasers and broad band light sources results in destruction of hair follicles while leaving the skin undamaged in a mouse model is compared.
Abstract: The presence of unwanted hair has a negative effect on the quality of life. Photo-hair destruction with laser devices is one of the most efficient methods of long-term hair destruction currently available (Freedman & Earley, 2000). Upon treatment with a laser or intense pulsed light device, light is absorbed over millisecond pulse durations by melanin contained within melanosomes in the hair matrix and within keratinocytes in the hair shaft. Heat energy is transferred from the follicular matrix to the surrounding non-pigmented follicular epithelium and perifollicular dermis. Sufficient thermal injury to the follicle and its surrounding tissue results in miniaturization of follicles such that they become clinically unapparent for a variable duration of time (Willey at al., 2007). Several hair destructive photo-systems have been shown to be effective (Haedersdal & Wulf, 2006; Leontaridou & Stalika, 2006). Ruby laser (694 nm) (Topping et al., 2001), alexandrite laser (755 nm) (Lehrer et al., 2003.), diode laser (800 to 810 nm) (Cameron et al., 2005; Zins et al., 2008), neodymium: yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (1064 nm) (Levy et al., 2001) and intense pulsed light sources (590 to 1200 nm) (Schroeter et al., 2004; Fodor et al., 2005) are commonly used. The parameters used with each system vary considerably (Liew, 2002). The methods for laser and intense pulsed light-assisted hair destruction are based on the principle of selective photothermolysis, with the melanin in the hair follicles serving as chromophore (Anderson & Parrish, 1983). Selective absorption of hair chromophores from lasers and broad band light sources results in destruction of hair follicles while leaving the skin undamaged (Lask et al., 1999; Liew, 2002). In the present study, we compared the efficacy of this phenomenon using a diode laser and an intense pulsed light (IPL) device in a mouse model. — SHORT COMMUNICATION —