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JournalISSN: 0883-9441

Journal of Critical Care 

About: Journal of Critical Care is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Intensive care & Intensive care unit. It has an ISSN identifier of 0883-9441. Over the lifetime, 4633 publication(s) have been published receiving 96879 citation(s).


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There is rationale, pre-clinical evidence of effectiveness and evidence of safety from long-time clinical use for other indications to justify clinical research on chloroquine in patients with COVID-19.
Abstract: Purpose COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) is a public health emergency of international concern. As of this time, there is no known effective pharmaceutical treatment, although it is much needed for patient contracting the severe form of the disease. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the evidence regarding chloroquine for the treatment of COVID-19. Methods PubMed, EMBASE, and three trial Registries were searched for studies on the use of chloroquine in patients with COVID-19. Results We included six articles (one narrative letter, one in-vitro study, one editorial, expert consensus paper, two national guideline documents) and 23 ongoing clinical trials in China. Chloroquine seems to be effective in limiting the replication of SARS-CoV-2 (virus causing COVID-19) in vitro. Conclusions There is rationale, pre-clinical evidence of effectiveness and evidence of safety from long-time clinical use for other indications to justify clinical research on chloroquine in patients with COVID-19. However, clinical use should either adhere to the Monitored Emergency Use of Unregistered Interventions (MEURI) framework or be ethically approved as a trial as stated by the World Health Organization. Safety data and data from high-quality clinical trials are urgently needed.

744 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Implementing the daily goals form resulted in a significant improvement in the percent of residents and nurses who understood the goals of care for the day and a reduction in ICU LOS.
Abstract: Background: Clear communication is imperative if teams in any industry expect to make improvements. An estimated 85% of errors across industries result from communication failures. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of communication during patient care rounds in the intensive care unit (ICU) using a daily goals form. Design: We conducted a prospective cohort study in collaboration with the Volunteer Hospital Association (VHA), Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), and Johns Hopkins Hospital's (JHH) 16-bed surgical oncology ICU. All patients admitted to the ICU were eligible. Main outcome variables were ICU length of stay (LOS) and percent of ICU residents and nurses who understood the goals of care for patients in the ICU. Baseline measurements were compared with measurements of understanding after implementation of a daily goals form. Results: At baseline, less than 10% of residents and nurses understood the goals of care for the day. After implementing the daily goals form, greater than 95% of nurses and residents understood the goals of care for the day. After implementation of the daily goals form, ICU LOS decreased from a mean of 2.2 days to 1.1 days. Conclusion: Implementing the daily goals form resulted in a significant improvement in the percent of residents and nurses who understood the goals of care for the day and a reduction in ICU LOS. The use of the daily goals form has broad applicability in acute care medicine. © 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

613 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A prospective controlled randomized study of the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation to treat newborns with respiratory failure using the "randomized play-the-winner" statistical method, which allows lung rest and improves survival compared to conventional ventilator therapy in newborn infants with severe respiratory failure.

529 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This narrative is a guide to the evolution of medical and critical care checklists, and a discussion of the barriers and risks to the implementation of checklists.
Abstract: Levels of cognitive function are often compromised with increasing levels of stress and fatigue, as is often the norm in certain complex, high-intensity fields of work. Aviation, aeronautics, and product manufacturing have come to rely heavily on checklists to aid in reducing human error. The checklist is an important tool in error management across all these fields, contributing significantly to reductions in the risk of costly mistakes and improving overall outcomes. Such benefits also translate to improving the delivery of patient care. Despite demonstrated benefits of checklists in medicine and critical care, the integration of checklists into practice has not been as rapid and widespread as with other fields. This narrative is a guide to the evolution of medical and critical care checklists, and a discussion of the barriers and risks to the implementation of checklists.

523 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The historical roots of simulation might be described with the broadest definition of medical simulation: "an imitation of some real thing, state of affairs, or process" for the practice of skills, problem solving, and judgment.
Abstract: The historical roots of simulation might be described with the broadest definition of medical simulation: "an imitation of some real thing, state of affairs, or process" for the practice of skills, problem solving, and judgment. From the first "blue box" flight simulator to the military's impetus in the transfer of modeling and simulation technology to medicine, worldwide acceptance of simulation training is growing. Large collaborative simulation centers support the expectation of increases in multidisciplinary, interprofessional, and multimodal simulation training. Virtual worlds, both immersive and Web-based, are at the frontier of innovation in medical education.

440 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202232
2021259
2020298
2019283
2018368
2017425