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JournalISSN: 2222-582X

Journal of Early Christian History 

Taylor & Francis
About: Journal of Early Christian History is an academic journal published by Taylor & Francis. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Early Christianity & New Testament. It has an ISSN identifier of 2222-582X. Over the lifetime, 217 publications have been published receiving 883 citations. The journal is also known as: JECH & A Journal of early Christian and Byzantine studies.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Among the Greek papyri in the John Rylands Library is a small, 5th century papyrus fragment inscribed on both sides with non-continuous scriptural texts as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Among the Greek papyri in the John Rylands Library is a small, 5th century papyrus fragment, inscribed on both sides with non-continuous scriptural texts. Arthur S. Hunt, who catalogued this portion of the collection, described Papyrus Rylandensis 8 as a 'liturgical fragment' designed for 'private devotional purposes'. Several features of this papyrus, however, (its size, content, decoration, irregular orthography, use of nomina sacra, and possible fold pattern) suggest that it may have been an amulet designed for use by children. Although few such amulets have been securely identified, the writings of contemporary clerics attest to the widespread use of protective charms by Christians. Given that P.Ryl. 8 corresponds in many details to what we assume these amulets would have looked like, it should be reclassified as 'probably an amulet.'

25 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The use of nursing and birthing as metaphors to describe Paul's dealings with some of the earliest churches was explored in this paper, where the authors make use of 1 Thess 2:7b to describe the relationship between nursing and birth.
Abstract: What are we to make of Paul’s use of nursing and birthing as metaphors to describe his dealings with some of the earliest churches? The appropriation of nursing and birthing imagery in 1 Thess 2:7b...

19 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The central figure of Acts of Thomas is the doubly enslaved apostle Thomas, metaphorically enslaved to his kyrios Christ, literally sold into slavery in a foreign land.
Abstract: The central figure of Acts of Thomas is the doubly enslaved apostle Thomas, metaphorically enslaved to his kyrios Christ, literally sold into slavery in a foreign land. As a result, the work returns frequently and explicitly to the theme of slavery, sustaining attention to the uneasy relationship between theological trope of slavery and lived realities and power relations of slavery. Caught between metaphor and critique, the narrative of Acts of Thomas assumes the inevitability of slavery, a tension epitomizing the representation of slavery in Christian writings of the era - slavery figured as metaphor to characterize relationship between believer and kyrios, slavery recognized as incongruent with the gospel of freedom, but nonetheless conceded as natural structure of the world.

17 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Marcosian "redemption" afterlife practice, described by Irenaeus (Haer 1215; see also, 1136), exhibits striking similarities with the Bacchic Gold Tablets as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: The Marcosian ‘redemption’ afterlife practice, described by Irenaeus (Haer 1215; see also, 1136), exhibits striking similarities with the Bacchic Gold Tablets This article exploits this largely neglected comparative opportunity to interrogate how the Marcosian redemption would have been recognisable to people in the Greco-Roman Mediterranean, thus bypassing the common focus in our field on ‘origins’ or ‘influences’ The Christians who participated in the Marcosian redemption emerge as people engaged in a broader genre of Greco-Roman religiosity that is associated with independent experts who adapted known mythic resources and offered access to afterlife benefits This article thus pursues a level of social analysis we often take for granted in Early Christian Studies by attending to the constituent practices of the Marcosian redemption as well as to the social conditions within which it could have been intelligible or compelling It furthermore leverages this analysis to suggest the fruitfulness of similarly redescribing other, more familiar early Christian materials in terms of practices

15 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Carson Bay1
TL;DR: In this paper, the author of De excidio Hierosolymitano (On the Destruction of Jerusalem) presents King David as a figure familiar from the Judaeo-Christian tradition, but in a way that resonates most strongly with classical Greco-Roman literary norms.
Abstract: Abstract In late ancient Christian literature, King David is ubiquitous. Not simply cited as the famous author of many psalms, he almost always appears as a model of penitence, a foreshadow of Christ, or a paradigm of Christian virtues and values. But not always. In one fourth-century Christian text, King David appears in a striking and distinctive relief. This Latin text, known as De excidio Hierosolymitano (On the Destruction of Jerusalem), sometimes called PseudoHegesippus, presents King David as a figure familiar from Judaeo-Christian tradition, but in a way that resonates most strongly with classical Greco-Roman literary norms. This text rewrites Josephus’s Jewish War from a Christian perspective, and mentions David at a dozen points. In each case, David appears as an exemplum associated with a particular biblical episode or theme. Often, the treatment of these episodes in Josephus or other early Christian literature helps explain why Pseudo-Hegesippus presents David in particular lights. However, taking all of the appearances of David in De Excidio into view, this article shows that Pseudo-Hegesippus is not only beholden to biblical, Josephan, or early Christian precedents, but creatively constructs his own portrait of David within his historiographical framework. This article then suggests that this David’s rhetorical valence and distinctive character are best explained vis-à-vis the traditional (Greek and) Roman use of exempla inasmuch as Pseudo-Hegesippus’s David conspicuously lacks any of the theological, doctrinal, or ethical features so characteristic of his portrayal in most of ancient Christian literature. Pseudo-Hegesippus portrays King David in terms resonant of both Greco-Roman and Judaeo-Christian traditions.

15 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
20234
202230
202113
202019
201913
201815