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JournalISSN: 0360-1234

Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part B-pesticides Food Contaminants and Agricultural Wastes 

Taylor & Francis
About: Journal of Environmental Science and Health Part B-pesticides Food Contaminants and Agricultural Wastes is an academic journal published by Taylor & Francis. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Medicine & Soil water. It has an ISSN identifier of 0360-1234. Over the lifetime, 3363 publications have been published receiving 52634 citations. The journal is also known as: Pesticides, food contaminants, and agricultural waste & Pesticides, food contaminants & agricultural wastes.
Topics: Medicine, Soil water, Loam, Sorption, Atrazine


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Journal ArticleDOI
Hamdy Balba1
TL;DR: This class of fungicides is relatively new, as crop protection products and information about them is still fairly scarce, but syntheses and chemistry of natural and synthetic strobilurins are discussed.
Abstract: Strobilurins are natural products isolated and identified from specific fungi. Natural strobilurins were named in the order of their discovery as strobilurin-A followed by strobilurin-B, C, D etc. Their discovery opened the door for new chemistry of synthetic fungicides. Applying Quantitative Structural Activity Relationship (QSAR) on the structures of the natural strobilurins, many pesticide companies were able to discover many synthetic analogues that are more efficacious and more stable fungicides. At present there are about eight synthetic strobilurins in the fungicides worldwide market. Some of these products are worldwide registered for use as agrochemical and some are in the process of registration. This class of fungicides is relatively new, as crop protection products and information about them is still fairly scarce. In this review, syntheses and chemistry of natural and synthetic strobilurins are discussed. Also, the mode of action, efficacy, biotic/abiotic degradation, analytical methods, and agricultural uses are discussed.

293 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Soils amended with sludges in the USA will be permitted (by USEPA-503 regulations) to accumulate Cr, Cd, Cu, Pb, Hg, Ni, and Se, and Zn to levels are very permissive by international standards.
Abstract: Contaminated soils can be a source for crop plants of such elements like As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn. The excessive transfer of As, Cu, Ni, and Zn to the food chain is controlled by a "soil-plant barrier"; however, for some elements, including Cd, the soil-plant barrier fails. The level of Cd ingested by average person in USA is about 12 micrograms/day, which is relatively low comparing to Risk Reference Dose (70 micrograms Cd/day) established by USEPA. Food of plant origin is a main source of Cd intake by modern society. Fish and shellfish may be a dominant dietary sources of Hg for some human populations. About half of human Pb intake is through food, of which more than half originates from plants. Dietary intake of Cd and Pb may be increased by application of sludges on cropland with already high levels of these metals. Soils amended with sludges in the USA will be permitted (by USEPA-503 regulations) to accumulate Cr, Cd, Cu, Pb, Hg, Ni, and Se, and Zn to levels from 10 to 100 times the present baseline concentrations. These levels are very permissive by international standards. Because of the limited supply of toxicity data obtained from metals applied in sewage sludge, predictions as to the new regulations will protect crop plants from metal toxicities, and food chain from contamination, are difficult to make.

239 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A multi-dimensional approach that exerts control on all the life stages of house fly, but simultaneously preserves the fly's natural enemies could be an ecologically sustainable way of maintaining the fly populations below maximally acceptable limits.
Abstract: Musca domestica L. (Diptera: Muscidae), commonly called the house fly, is a major domestic, medical and veterinary pest that causes irritation, spoils food and acts as a vector for many pathogenic organisms. In this paper, the social and health problems related to housefly are introduced with the associated need to control its population. Physical and chemical methods of house fly control are briefly discussed. The main focus of this review is on the biological control methods for house fly control, that comprise botanical, fungal, bacterial and parasitoid agents. Although several biocontrol agents are still in the nascent stage, some of them (especially fungal and parasitoid agents) have shown reliable field performance and seem to be suitable candidates for commercialization. However, the majority of these laboratory and field studies have been conducted in the temperate region. It remains to be seen whether the application of biocontrol agents would be feasible in tropical environments. The integrated pest management practices, which can provide more reliable field performance, have also been discussed. A multi-dimensional approach that exerts control on all the life stages of house fly, but simultaneously preserves the fly's natural enemies could be an ecologically sustainable way of maintaining the fly populations below maximally acceptable limits.

211 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Exposure to low, increasing levels of endosulfan and chlorpyrifos can differentially modify endogenous antioxidants SOD, GPX and GSH, which may lead to the development of oxidative stress in some tissues.
Abstract: Two experiments were conducted in male SD rats (225–250 g) to determine changes in the activities of endogenous antioxidants superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and concentrations of glutathione (GSH) in tissues after exposure to low doses of endosulfan and chlorpyrifos using a whole body exposure technique. In both experiments, 6 rats/group were exposed 3 hr/day, 5 days/week for 30 days to: 0 (control), 5, 10, 20, 40 and 60% of LD50 of either pesticide in 50% ethanol; actual concentrations were: endosulfan = 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0 mg/250 g body weight; chlorpyrifos = 0, 1.9, 3.8, 7.6, 15.2, and 22.8 mg/250 g body weight. Endosulfan decreased erythrocyte SOD by 21% in all groups and chlorpyrifos increased SOD by 18% in groups 40 and 60. Liver SOD was 12%–20% lower after endosulfan exposure; lung SOD was altered: endosulfan decreased activity by 21% and 51% and chlorpyrifos by 58 and 75% in the 40 and 60 groups, respectively (P ≤ 0.05). Both pesticides increased pla...

191 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Risk assessment based on the calculated risk quotients showed that only erythromycin-H2O and roxithromycin detected in the Pearl Rivers might have adverse effects on aquatic organisms.
Abstract: The distribution and occurrence of 15 antibiotics in surface water of the Pearl River System (Liuxi River, Shijing River and Zhujiang River) and effluents of four wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were investigated in two sampling events representing wet season and dry season by using rapid resolution liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (RRLC-MS/MS) in positive ionization mode. Only eight antibiotics (sulfadiazine, sulfapyridine, sulfamethazine, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, roxithromycin, erythromycin-H₂O and norfloxacin) were detected in the water samples of the three rivers and the effluents. The detection frequencies and levels of antibiotics in the dry season were higher than those in the wet season. This could be attributed to the dilution effects in the wet season and relatively lower temperature in the dry season under which antibiotics could persist for a longer period. The levels of the detected antibiotics in different sites are generally in a decreasing order as follows: Shijing River ≥WWTP effluent ≥Zhujiang River ≥ Liuxi River. Risk assessment based on the calculated risk quotients showed that only erythromycin-H₂O and roxithromycin detected in the Pearl Rivers might have adverse effects on aquatic organisms.

185 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202348
202296
2021107
2020119
2019111
201897