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JournalISSN: 1053-8720

Journal of Gay and Lesbian Social Services 

Routledge
About: Journal of Gay and Lesbian Social Services is an academic journal published by Routledge. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Lesbian & Transgender. It has an ISSN identifier of 1053-8720. Over the lifetime, 835 publications have been published receiving 15650 citations. The journal is also known as: Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is suggested that mental health professionals working with LGB youths should address social support and that public health approaches are needed to reduce levels of victimization.
Abstract: Research suggests that lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youths are at increased risk for both victimization and internalizing mental health problems, but limited research has studied their association or factors that increase resilience. The sample in this study included 425 LGBs between the ages of 16 and 24 years. The majority had disclosed their sexual orientation to family or friends (98%), and 97% had someone in their lives who was accepting of their orientation. Racial/ethnic minority and female participants in general reported lower levels of disclosure and acceptance. Most participants reported some form of sexual orientation-related victimization (94%). Victimization was associated with psychological distress, but a compensatory model indicated that in the context of this victimization both peer and family support had significant promotive effects. A test of a protective model found social support did not ameliorate negative effects of victimization. The positive effects of family support decreas...

218 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors assess the extent of non-injection recreational drug use among gay and bisexual men frequenting gay social venues, as well as assess recent initiation of substance use, especially "club drugs" and document the interaction between drug use and risky sexual practices.
Abstract: The complex relationships between recreational non-injection drug use and HIV sexual risk behaviors have been documented throughout the epidemic. The purpose of this study was to (1) assess the extent of non-injection recreational drug use among gay and bisexual men frequenting gay social venues, as well as to assess recent initiation of substance use, especially “club drugs” and (2) document the interaction between drug use and risky sexual practices. Street recruitment methods were used to administer a survey to 202 gay or bisexual men recruited at ten gay social venues in New York City. The majority of participants reported substance use, and more than half reported the use of drugs other than alcohol. Participation in gay social venues such as bars, dance clubs, and bathhouses was associated with more substance use. Polydrug use, participation in gay venues, and HIV status were found to be associated with unprotected behaviors while under the influence. In multivariate analyses, the use of in...

201 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For instance, the authors found that the more gender nonconforming the youth, the more likely they reported that they were verbally and physically abused by their mothers and fathers, and that 54% of the mothers and 63% of their fathers initially reacted negatively and 50% of mothers and 44% of fathers reacted negatively at the time of interviews, an average of 3 years later.
Abstract: Fifty-five transgender youth described their gender development and expression, parent' reactions to their gender nonconformity, and initial and current mother' and father' reactions to their transgender identity. All of the youth reported feeling different from others in early childhood. Forty-three of the participant' mothers and 26 of their fathers knew about their identities. The youth reported that 54% of their mothers and 63% of their fathers initially reacted negatively, and 50% of the mothers and 44% of their fathers reacted negatively at the time of the interviews, an average of 3 years later. The more gender nonconforming the youth, the more likely they reported that they were verbally and physically abused by their mothers and fathers. Implications of these findings for social service professionals are discussed.

177 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a total of 1,749 self-selected gay men and lesbians representing 560 gay couples and 706 lesbian couples were surveyed concerning their relationships, finding that respondents had been in their relationships an average of 6 years.
Abstract: A total of 1,749 self-selected gay men and lesbians representing 560 gay couples and 706 lesbian couples were surveyed concerning their relationships. Respondents had been in their relationships an average of 6 years. Findings form 13 topics relevant to relationships underscore the diversity and complicity of same sex couples. Primary attention is given to distinctions between male and female couples and factors correlated with relationship quality.

161 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued for HIV-prevention interventions to take a more culturally appropriate, nuanced approach to reaching African American youth at risk, utilizing community and family structures, in whatever forms these may take.
Abstract: This article focuses on the construction of homes and families within the ballroom community, a prominent feature of urban GLBTQ communities of color in cities across the United States. Based on two ethnographic studies with ballroom communities in the San Francisco Bay Area, California, and Detroit, Michigan, we explore the importance of gender and sexual identity in informing community practice around HIV prevention and treatment. As a community, the ballroom scene provides African American queer youth with support for same-sex desire and identity, along with multiple forms of support for HIV prevention. Our study of the ballroom community documents current forms of “intravention” occurring within the community and the importance of the gender-sex system in organizing these practices. We also offer recommendations for community-based organizations to partner with the ballroom community, making use of existing social structures within the community and the salient concepts of home and family, to provide HIV-related services and support. We argue for HIV-prevention interventions to take a more culturally appropriate, nuanced approach to reaching African American youth at risk, utilizing community and family structures, in whatever forms these may take.

159 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
20234
202222
202146
202026
201928
201825