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JournalISSN: 1939-6716

Journal of Late Antiquity 

Johns Hopkins University Press
About: Journal of Late Antiquity is an academic journal published by Johns Hopkins University Press. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Late Antiquity & Politics. It has an ISSN identifier of 1939-6716. Over the lifetime, 284 publications have been published receiving 2113 citations. The journal is also known as: JLA.
Topics: Late Antiquity, Politics, Empire, Emperor, Antique


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a new trend in late antique studies is linked especially to the work of Henri-Irenee Marrou and Peter Brown, and this trend was reversed on account of a progressive change of perspective and sensibility.
Abstract: Late Antiquity as a period has a complex history with moments when the issues pertaining to it seem to intensify. One of these was without a doubt the aftermath of World War I and reached its apex in 1923 during the International Congress of Historical Sciences in Brussels. The tragic events that had shaken Europe had a deep impact on historiography. In the aftermath of World War II, this trend was reversed on account of a progressive change of perspective and sensibility. The new trend in late antique studies is linked especially to the work of Henri-Irenee Marrou and, more recently, Peter Brown. Marrou is responsible for the acquisition of esthetic standards that promoted an appreciation for the literary and artistic values of Late Antiquity. The very innovative reading of Late Antiquity (“a long Late Antiquity”) proposed by Brown also has had a great impact: on the one hand, Brown’s reading has made useless a periodization based on historical events, and, on the other, it has rendered impossible the concepts of crisis and decline. Recently, however, periodization has made a comeback and the decline and fall of the Roman Empire again seems worthy of consideration.

61 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on how Constantine sought to assert his legitimacy during the various stages of his rise to power, by using a variety of means, such as membership of a college of emperors, preferred candidate of the army or Senate, winner in civil war, or member of a dynasty.
Abstract: Modern scholarship, following the template laid down by Lactantius and Eusebius, has viewed the achievements of Constantine chiefly through the prism of his Christianity, with the result that his secular achievements have been comparatively neglected. This article addresses those secular policies, focusing on how Constantine sought to assert his legitimacy during the various stages of his rise to power. It takes as its starting point the modern debate on the legitimacy of Constantine’s elevation to the purple and whether or not he can be justifiably described as a usurper. Through close scrutiny of a variety of documentary sources—particularly inscriptions, but also coins—it establishes how Constantine sought to affirm the legitimacy of his position as emperor at a number of critical moments, and to have that legitimacy accepted both by other members of the imperial college and by the empire’s populace at large. It emerges that Constantine appealed to a variety of means to assert his legitimacy, for example, as a member of a college of emperors, as the preferred candidate of the army or Senate, as victor in civil war, or as a member of a dynasty. Furthermore, he invested considerable effort in buttressing his claims by actively deconstructing the legitimacy of his rivals, notably Maxentius and Licinius, whom he designated instead as tyranni. Thus Constantine made a notable contribution to the articulation of ideas of imperial legitimacy in the fourth century, and his strategies were adopted, most immediately, by his sons. Now is the winter of our discontent Made glorious summer by this sun of York ( Richard III , Act I, Scene I)

55 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors trace the development of post-Iranian regimes through the dynamic interplay of nomadic and sedentary political institutions in the fourth through early seventh centuries.
Abstract: Contemporaneously with the fall and transformation of the Roman West, the Iranian Empire yielded its East to Hun—and later Turk—conquerors. This article traces the development of post-Iranian regimes through the dynamic interplay of nomadic and sedentary political institutions in the fourth through early seventh centuries. The conquerors adopted Iranian institutions, integrated the Iranian aristocracy, and presented themselves as the legitimate heirs of the kings of kings in a manner reminiscent of post-Roman rulers. At the same time, however, the Huns and the Turks retained the superior military resources of nomadic imperialism, included the Iranian East in trans-Eurasian networks, and distinguished themselves as ruling ethno-classes tied to the steppe. The resulting hybrid political culture came to be known as Turan.

50 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The essay as discussed by the authors offers a series of perspectives on the historiography of late Antiquity and relates popular indices of continuity, change, and decline to particular systems of moral and aesthetic evaluation.
Abstract: The essay offers a series of perspectives on the historiography of Late Antiquity. It relates popular indices of continuity, change, and decline to particular systems of moral and aesthetic evaluation. Most pointedly, it asks what is bracketed, and what presumed, by cultural-historical study in this period, and suggests three failings in the literature: too much credence is often granted to interested ancient claims to innovation; modern analytic categories often are redescribed as the motivating polarities of ancient discourse; and ancient interests (for example, in ethnicity) are perforce remobilized in modern study. All three moves support particular, often dubious periodizations of the classical and late antique and require on-going interrogation.

48 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A critical review of the professional scholarship that argues for Rome's putative "decline and fall" due to major environmental crises, namely climate change and the first global pandemic of the bubonic plague, is presented in this article.
Abstract: Abstract:A series of recent publications, both scholarly and popular, has identified the physical environment as a primary historical agent in the Roman Empire’s development and decline as a major (and distinct) political, cultural, and economic entity. This essay presents a critical review of the professional scholarship that argues for Rome’s putative “decline and fall” due to major environmental crises, namely climate change and the first global pandemic of the bubonic plague. Particular attention is given to the problems of historical agency and causation, environmental determinism, interdisciplinarity, and the role of discourse in studying the human experience of environmental change in Late Antiquity. It offers some preliminary suggestions for a “second phase” of scholarship, which could potentially correct current methodological problems and offer a path toward understanding the irreducibly complex relationship between human and non-human historical agents.

33 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202317
202236
20211
202016
201916
201820