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JournalISSN: 1438-8871

Journal of Medical Internet Research 

JMIR Publications
About: Journal of Medical Internet Research is an academic journal published by JMIR Publications. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Medicine & Health care. It has an ISSN identifier of 1438-8871. It is also open access. Over the lifetime, 7632 publications have been published receiving 315454 citations. The journal is also known as: JMIR & J Med Internet Res.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A checklist of recommendations for authors is being presented by theJMIR in an effort to ensure complete descriptions of Web-based surveys and it is hoped that author adherence to the checklist will increase the usefulness of such reports.
Abstract: An error in the CHERRIES statement has been corrected (J Med Internet Res 2004;6[3]:e34). In the original paper, in table 1, denominator and numerator were flipped in the recommendations on how response rates (view rate, participation rate, and completion rate) should be calculated. The view rate should be the ratio of unique survey visitors divided by unique site visitors. The participation rate should be the ratio of those who agreed to participate divided by unique first survey page visitors. The completion rate is the ratio of the number of people who finished the survey divided by those who agreed to participate. The corrections have been made in the table in both columns. [J Med Internet Res 2012;14(1):e8]

3,009 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The present review provides a framework for the development of a science of Internet-based interventions and provides a rationale for investing in more intensive theory- based interventions that incorporate multiple behavior change techniques and modes of delivery.
Abstract: Background: The Internet is increasingly used as a medium for the delivery of interventions designed to promote health behavior change. However, reviews of these interventions to date have not systematically identified intervention characteristics and linked these to effectiveness. Objectives: The present review sought to capitalize on recently published coding frames for assessing use of theory and behavior change techniques to investigate which characteristics of Internet-based interventions best promote health behavior change. In addition, we wanted to develop a novel coding scheme for assessing mode of delivery in Internet-based interventions and also to link different modes to effect sizes. Methods: We conducted a computerized search of the databases indexed by ISI Web of Knowledge (including BIOSIS Previews and Medline) between 2000 and 2008. Studies were included if (1) the primary components of the intervention were delivered via the Internet, (2) participants were randomly assigned to conditions, and (3) a measure of behavior related to health was taken after the intervention. Results: We found 85 studies that satisfied the inclusion criteria, providing a total sample size of 43,236 participants. On average, interventions had a statistically small but significant effect on health-related behavior (d+ = 0.16, 95% CI 0.09-0.23). More extensive use of theory was associated with increases in effect size (P = .049), and, in particular, interventions based on the theory of planned behavior tended to have substantial effects on behavior (d+ = 0.36, 95% CI 0.15-0.56). Interventions that incorporated more behavior change techniques also tended to have larger effects compared to interventions that incorporated fewer techniques (P < .001). Finally, the effectiveness of Internet-based interventions was enhanced by the use of additional methods of communicating with participants, especially the use of short message service (SMS), or text, messages. Conclusions: The review provides a framework for the development of a science of Internet-based interventions, and our findings provide a rationale for investing in more intensive theory-based interventions that incorporate multiple behavior change techniques and modes of delivery. [J Med Internet Res 2010;12(1):e4]

2,224 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The need for a “science of attrition” is argued, that is, a need to develop models for discontinuation of e health applications and the related phenomenon of participants dropping out of eHealth trials, as well as measures to be reported including the relative risk of dropping out or of stopping the use of an application.
Abstract: In an ongoing effort of this Journal to develop and further the theories, models, and best practices around eHealth research, this paper argues for the need for a “science of attrition”, that is, a need to develop models for discontinuation of eHealth applications and the related phenomenon of participants dropping out of eHealth trials. What I call “law of attrition” here is the observation that in any eHealth trial a substantial proportion of users drop out before completion or stop using the appplication. This feature of eHealth trials is a distinct characteristic compared to, for example, drug trials. The traditional clinical trial and evidence-based medicine paradigm stipulates that high dropout rates make trials less believable. Consequently eHealth researchers tend to gloss over high dropout rates, or not to publish their study results at all, as they see their studies as failures. However, for many eHealth trials, in particular those conducted on the Internet and in particular with self-help applications, high dropout rates may be a natural and typical feature. Usage metrics and determinants of attrition should be highlighted, measured, analyzed, and discussed. This also includes analyzing and reporting the characteristics of the subpopulation for which the application eventually “works”, ie, those who stay in the trial and use it. For the question of what works and what does not, such attrition measures are as important to report as pure efficacy measures from intention-to-treat (ITT) analyses. In cases of high dropout rates efficacy measures underestimate the impact of an application on a population which continues to use it. Methods of analyzing attrition curves can be drawn from survival analysis methods, eg, the Kaplan-Meier analysis and proportional hazards regression analysis (Cox model). Measures to be reported include the relative risk of dropping out or of stopping the use of an application, as well as a “usage half-life”, and models reporting demographic and other factors predicting usage discontinuation in a population. Differential dropout or usage rates between two interventions could be a standard metric for the “usability efficacy” of a system. A “run-in and withdrawal” trial design is suggested as a methodological innovation for Internet-based trials with a high number of initial dropouts/nonusers and a stable group of hardcore users. [J Med Internet Res 2005;7(1):e11]

2,083 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Everybody talks about e-health these days, but few people have come up with a clear definition of this comparatively new term, which was apparently first used by industry leaders and marketing people rather than academics.
Abstract: Everybody talks about e-health these days, but few people have come up with a clear definition of this comparatively new term. Barely in use before 1999, this term now seems to serve as a general "buzzword," used to characterize not only "Internet medicine", but also virtually everything related to computers and medicine. The term was apparently first used by industry leaders and marketing people rather than academics. They created and used this term in line with other "e-words" such as e-commerce, e-business, e-solutions, and so on, in an attempt to convey the promises, principles, excitement (and hype) around e-commerce (electronic commerce) to the health arena, and to give an account of the new possibilities the Internet is opening up to the area of health care. Intel, for example, referred to e-health as "a concerted effort undertaken by leaders in health care and hi-tech industries to fully harness the benefits available through convergence of the Internet and health care." Because the Internet created new opportunities and challenges to the traditional health care information technology industry, the use of a new term to address these issues seemed appropriate. These "new" challenges for the health care information technology industry were mainly (1) the capability of consumers to interact with their systems online (B2C = "business to consumer"); (2) improved possibilities for institutionto-institution transmissions of data (B2B = "business to business"); (3) new possibilities for peerto-peer communication of consumers (C2C = "consumer to consumer").

1,898 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Social media brings a new dimension to health care as it offers a medium to be used by the public, patients, and health professionals to communicate about health issues with the possibility of potentially improving health outcomes.
Abstract: Background: There is currently a lack of information about the uses, benefits, and limitations of social media for health communication among the general public, patients, and health professionals from primary research Objective: To review the current published literature to identify the uses, benefits, and limitations of social media for health communication among the general public, patients, and health professionals, and identify current gaps in the literature to provide recommendations for future health communication research Methods: This paper is a review using a systematic approach A systematic search of the literature was conducted using nine electronic databases and manual searches to locate peer-reviewed studies published between January 2002 and February 2012 Results: The search identified 98 original research studies that included the uses, benefits, and/or limitations of social media for health communication among the general public, patients, and health professionals The methodological quality of the studies assessed using the Downs and Black instrument was low; this was mainly due to the fact that the vast majority of the studies in this review included limited methodologies and was mainly exploratory and descriptive in nature Seven main uses of social media for health communication were identified, including focusing on increasing interactions with others, and facilitating, sharing, and obtaining health messages The six key overarching benefits were identified as (1) increased interactions with others, (2) more available, shared, and tailored information, (3) increased accessibility and widening access to health information, (4) peer/social/emotional support, (5) public health surveillance, and (6) potential to influence health policy Twelve limitations were identified, primarily consisting of quality concerns and lack of reliability, confidentiality, and privacy Conclusions: Social media brings a new dimension to health care as it offers a medium to be used by the public, patients, and health professionals to communicate about health issues with the possibility of potentially improving health outcomes Social media is a powerful tool, which offers collaboration between users and is a social interaction mechanism for a range of individuals Although there are several benefits to the use of social media for health communication, the information exchanged needs to be monitored for quality and reliability, and the users’ confidentiality and privacy need to be maintained Eight gaps in the literature and key recommendations for future health communication research were provided Examples of these recommendations include the need to determine the relative effectiveness of different types of social media for health communication using randomized control trials and to explore potential mechanisms for monitoring and enhancing the quality and reliability of health communication using social media Further robust and comprehensive evaluation and review, using a range of methodologies, are required to establish whether social media improves health communication practice both in the short and long terms

1,693 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
2023381
20221,127
20211,228
20201,382
2019725
2018520