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Showing papers in "Journal of Music Teacher Education in 1997"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The best book is the best book for each of us as mentioned in this paper, and we offer the best here to read, after deciding how your feeling will be, you can enjoy to visit the link and get the book.
Abstract: We present here because it will be so easy for you to access the internet service. As in this new era, much technology is sophistically offered by connecting to the internet. No any problems to face, just for this day, you can really keep in mind that the book is the best book for you. We offer the best here to read. After deciding how your feeling will be, you can enjoy to visit the link and get the book.

1,750 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Herman, Aschbacher, and Winters as discussed by the authors suggest that the use of authentic assessment strategies may provide more student motivation and better transfer of learning: ''Modern curriculum theorists emphasize the importance of engaging students in authentic, realworld tasks because they seem more motivating and have greater transferability than more traditional, decontextualized academic tasks.
Abstract: 6 One of the efforts of school reformers and educators has been to encourage teachers to test and evaluate students in ways that require them to demonstrate skills through authentic tasks. There is much educational literature that supports this concept of authentic assessment in a variety of educational settings.! In A Practical Guide to Alternative Assessment, Joan L. Herman, Pamela R. Aschbacher, and Lynn Winters suggest that the use of authentic assessment strategies may provide more student motivation and better transfer of learning: \"Modern curriculum theorists emphasize the importance of engaging students in authentic, realworld tasks because they seem more motivating and have greater transferability than more traditional, decontextualized academic tasks.\"2

7 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present strategies for tracking student's progress in their goal to become choral music educators by designing an instructional and assessment plan, guided by several questions in four areas: goals.
Abstract: In preparing to teach an undergraduate choral methods course, I considered strategies for tracking my preservice students' progress in their goal to become choral music educators.! In designing an instructional and assessment plan, I was guided by several questions in four areas: Goals. Who should establish goals for preservice teachers? Should the goal-setting process consist of only teacher input or of a student-teacher collaboration? Learning' process. How do teachers involve students in the learning process? How do teachers share the responsibility for learning? Reflective thinking. How might teachers best facilitate opportunities for students to become reflective about their teaching? What educational situations enable preservice teachers to reflect on their teaching and the teaching of others? Authentic assessment. How might portfolio assessment be implemented

6 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The use of portfolios for assessment of student growth and learning in the arts has been studied in both public schools and universities as mentioned in this paper, with an emphasis on the use of student portfolios for music education.
Abstract: The past several years have seen an increasing use of portfolios in both public schools and universities. In some disciplines in higher education, such as art and writing, portfolios have traditionally been used to evaluate student work. The Arts Propel program (a collaborative effort between Harvard University's Project Zero, the Pittsburgh Public Schools, and the Educational Testing Service) uses portfolios to assess student growth in the arts. 1 Recently there has been an interest in using portfolios for collegiate music education, especially in the areas of student teaching and master's prograrns.Z Portfolio development has several desirable effects, including providing an organized and ongoing forum for student reflection and the possibility for qualitative assessment of students' growth and learning in a partie-

5 citations




Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigate the factors that contribute to the development of a distinguished teacher and find that the current structure of teacher education and schooling has an impact on creating exemplary teachers, and that changes in teacher education, the structure of schools, and the way teachers are assessed have a positive effect on teacher development.
Abstract: 16 How does a teacher become an exemplary teacher? What changes occur as a teacher moves from being a novice student teacher to an experienced veteran that students remember as greatly influencing their lives? Why is it that when we think about influential teachers in our lives, we remember one or two of them rather than ten or twelve? Assuming that the current structure of teacher education and schooling has an impact on creating exemplary teachers, could changes in teacher education, the structure of schools, and the way teachers are assessed have a positive effect on the development of more outstanding teachers? While we can observe general characteristics and quali ties of exemplary teachers, the factors that contribute to the development of a distinguished teacher are less clear. Recent developments in teacher assessment through teacher-constructed video portfolios, however, might make the

2 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: As professional choral music educators, we have essentially declared: (1) Music is for every child, (2) Anyone can be taught to sing, teaching is a noble profession, and the arts are essential as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: As professional choral music educators, we have essentially declared: (1) Music is for every child, (2) Anyone can be taught to sing, (3) Teaching is a noble profession, (4) The arts are essential, and (5) Singing is the \"gift,\" discipline is the \"way,\" and making choral music is the \"art.\" If we believe these things and if these \"credos\" are true, what are the answers to the following questions? 1 • Why did 62 percent of the conductors polled report fewer students participating in choral music at the time of a recent survey than five years previous to the survey?2 • Why, according to one publisher, are sales for choral music education textbooks one-half of what they were twenty years ago?3 • Why are 30 percent fewer juniors and seniors studying music now than in the 1950s?4 • Why are only nine states mandating an arts curriculum for all high school students? 5

1 citations




Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For instance, when returning from a morning drive, a driver is asked, ''How was the trip?'' there are several ways the driver could respond as discussed by the authors, and each of these three ways of evaluating yields different information than the other.
Abstract: If: when returning from a morning drive, a driver is asked, \"How was the trip?\" there are several ways the driver could respond.! If the driver, let's say John, receives a speeding ticket, he might give a very specific, numerical account of the drive. Or he might carefully think back, giving an overall interpretation that is more descriptive and less empirical. A third way that he might have .responded involves giving an account of the activity as it unfolded. In other words, he would have evaluated road conditions, traffic, the car's handling, and a myriad of other things while the car moved along the pavement. Each of these three ways of evaluating yields different information than the other, yet they are each accurate in their own way. Similarly, the way educators ask students to evaluate their own performances will determine the kind ofanswer that is given. The National Standards clearly