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JournalISSN: 1555-7359

Journal of Politics & Society 

About: Journal of Politics & Society is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Politics & Public policy. It has an ISSN identifier of 1555-7359. Over the lifetime, 67 publications have been published receiving 247 citations.

Papers published on a yearly basis

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that if parents are given the freedom to choose their children's schools, and if they prefer productive schools, then administrators who hope to attract students will face incentives to raise productivity.
Abstract: There is widespread agreement that American public schools perform poorly. Many proposed policy responses—charter schools and school vouchers, for example— are motivated by the idea that schools will improve if forced to compete to attract students. If parents are given the freedom to choose their children’s schools, and if they prefer productive schools, then school administrators who hope to attract students will face incentives to raise productivity.

40 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the impact of Brazil's conditional cash transfer program on poverty in urban and rural areas, formally testing the hypothesis that the program has a rural bias because its eligibility cut-off and transfer size are not adjusted for spatial price differences.
Abstract: An important dimension in assessing any anti-poverty program is to know how it affects the living standards of different subgroups of the poor "is paper examines the impact of Brazil’s conditional cash transfer program on poverty in urban and rural areas, formally testing the hypothesis that the program has a rural bias because its eligibility cut-off and transfer size are not adjusted for spatial price differences Grosh et al (2008) argue that a program that does not adjust its eligibility cut-off for spatial price differences will be biased toward the rural poor because they face a lower cost of living Fiszbein and Schady (2009) find that eligible families in urban areas are less likely to participate in Bolsa Familia, which they attribute to self-exclusion due to the cost of living differential and the implicitly lower value of the transfer in cities Although the authors suggest that Bolsa Familia might have a rural bias, no study has rigorously compared its impact in urban and rural areas* Regional price differences are not negligible in Brazil: the Laspeyres price index based on the cost of food and housing, indexed to 1000 for metropolitan Sao Paulo, is 0447 in the rural Northeast region1 In other words, the cost of living in Sao Paulo is more than twice the cost of living in the rural Northeast "e real value of Bolsa Familia’s eligibility cut-off and the purchasing power of the transfer are therefore significantly higher in more rural states than in Sao Paulo "is paper first presents a counterfactual static incidence analysis to determine the impact of Bolsa Familia in 2009, using

31 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the Kenyan Permanent Secretary of Information and Communication, Dr. Bitange Ndemo, met with the Kenyan permanent secretary of information and communication, and asked him about the government's vision for Kenya.
Abstract: western Nairobi, a man walked up to me and introduced himself as George. It was noon on a December day in 2010 and the grounds were filled with people. George took out his mobile phone and showed it to me. !is was no surprise; after spending a few days in the slum, I had met people who told me they lived on the street but owned or used mobile phones. He explained how the phone was vital to his livelihood and that of his family. I asked him what he thought about the many non-governmental organization (NGO) events taking place in the slum, a question to which he responded “most people in Kibera do not trust barazas [public meetings] because they think someone has been paid to do it. With this”—he held up his phone—“we ourselves [sic] can do the things.”1 !e next week, I met with the Kenyan Permanent Secretary of Information and Communication, Dr. Bitange Ndemo, and asked him about the government’s vision for Kenya. Ndemo responded that he wants every Kenyan to have access to information and communication technologies (ICT): “For every 10 percent [of growth in ICT access], you grow the economy by 1.5 percent [of ] GDP.” In this way, he explained, Kenya would develop as an ICT hub for East Africa, which would strengthen and improve the Kenyan state. Achieving this goal required the participation of all Kenyans and a change in the national work ethic toward “a Version 2.0 of our culture,” he stated, adding that this required integration and discipline.2 !ese stories show two very different perspectives on what mobile phone technology means for Kenya and Kenyans. For MAKING SLUMS GOVERNABLE: INTEGRATION AND RESISTANCE IN A NAIROBI SLUM

15 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
20165
20153
20149
20137
201213
201113