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JournalISSN: 1941-7012

Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy 

American Institute of Physics
About: Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy is an academic journal published by American Institute of Physics. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Wind power & Photovoltaic system. It has an ISSN identifier of 1941-7012. Over the lifetime, 2709 publications have been published receiving 37566 citations. The journal is also known as: JRSE.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a review and comparative study of various technologies currently used for dewatering microalgal cultures along with a comparative analysis of the performances of different technologies.
Abstract: Microalgae dewatering is a major obstruction to industrial-scale processing of microalgae for biofuel production. The dilute nature of harvested microalgal cultures creates a huge operational cost during dewatering, thereby, rendering algae-based fuels less economically attractive. Currently there is no superior method of dewatering microalgae. A technique that may result in a greater algal biomass may have drawbacks such as a high capital cost or high energy consumption. The choice of which harvesting technique to apply will depend on the species of microalgae and the final product desired. Algal properties such as a large cell size and the capability of the microalgae to autoflocculate can simplify the dewatering process. This article reviews and addresses the various technologies currently used for dewatering microalgal cultures along with a comparative study of the performances of the different technologies.

978 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the experimental results on solar collectors based on nanofluids made from a variety of nanoparticles (carbon nanotubes, graphite, and silver) were reported.
Abstract: Solar energy is one of the best sources of renewable energy with minimal environmental impact. Direct absorption solar collectors have been proposed for a variety of applications such as water heating; however the efficiency of these collectors is limited by the absorption properties of the working fluid, which is very poor for typical fluids used in solar collectors. It has been shown that mixing nanoparticles in a liquid (nanofluid) has a dramatic effect on the liquid thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity. Nanoparticles also offer the potential of improving the radiative properties of liquids, leading to an increase in the efficiency of direct absorption solar collectors. Here we report on the experimental results on solar collectors based on nanofluids made from a variety of nanoparticles (carbon nanotubes, graphite, and silver). We demonstrate efficiency improvements of up to 5% in solar thermal collectors by utilizing nanofluids as the absorption mechanism. In addition the experiment...

759 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated the use of counter-rotating vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs) in order to achieve higher power output per unit land area than existing wind farms consisting of HAWTs.
Abstract: Modern wind farms comprised of horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs) require significant land resources to separate each wind turbine from the adjacent turbine wakes. This aerodynamic constraint limits the amount of power that can be extracted from a given wind farm footprint. The resulting inefficiency of HAWT farms is currently compensated by using taller wind turbines to access greater wind resources at high altitudes, but this solution comes at the expense of higher engineering costs and greater visual, acoustic, radar, and environmental impacts. We investigated the use of counter-rotating vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs) in order to achieve higher power output per unit land area than existing wind farms consisting of HAWTs. Full-scale field tests of 10-m tall VAWTs in various counter-rotating configurations were conducted under natural wind conditions during summer 2010. Whereas modern wind farms consisting of HAWTs produce 2–3 W of power per square meter of land area, these field tests indicate that power densities an order of magnitude greater can potentially be achieved by arranging VAWTs in layouts that enable them to extract energy from adjacent wakes and from above the wind farm. Moreover, this improved performance does not require higher individual wind turbine efficiency, only closer wind turbine spacing and a sufficient vertical flux of turbulence kinetic energy from the atmospheric surface layer. The results suggest an alternative approach to wind farming that has the potential to concurrently reduce the cost, size, and environmental impacts of wind farms.

435 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The WindFloat as discussed by the authors is a three-legged floating foundation for multimegawatt offshore wind turbines, which is designed to accommodate a wind turbine, 5 MW or larger, on one of the columns of the hull with minimal modifications to the nacelle and rotor.
Abstract: This manuscript summarizes the feasibility study conducted for the WindFloat technology. The WindFloat is a three-legged floating foundation for multimegawatt offshore wind turbines. It is designed to accommodate a wind turbine, 5 MW or larger, on one of the columns of the hull with minimal modifications to the nacelle and rotor. Potential redesign of the tower and of the turbine control software can be expected. Technologies for floating foundations for offshore wind turbines are evolving. It is agreed by most experts that the offshore wind industry will see a significant increase in activity in the near future. Fixed offshore turbines are limited in water depth to ∼30–50 m. Market transition to deeper waters is inevitable, provided that suitable technologies can be developed. Despite the increase in complexity, a floating foundation offers the following distinct advantages: Flexibility in site location; access to superior wind resources further offshore; ability to locate in coastal regions with limited shallow continental shelf; ability to locate further offshore to eliminate visual impacts; an integrated hull, without a need to redesign the transition piece between the tower and the submerged structure for every project; simplified offshore installation procedures. Anchors are significantly cheaper to install than fixed foundations and large diameter towers. This paper focuses first on the design basis for wind turbine floating foundations and explores the requirements that must be addressed by design teams in this new field. It shows that the design of the hull for a large wind turbine must draw on the synergies with oil and gas offshore platform technology, while accounting for the different design requirements and functionality of the wind turbine. This paper describes next the hydrodynamic analysis of the hull, as well as ongoing work consisting of coupling hull hydrodynamics with wind turbine aerodynamic forces. Three main approaches are presented: The numerical hydrodynamic model of the platform and its mooring system; wave tank testing of a scale model of the platform with simplified aerodynamic simulation of the wind turbine; FAST, an aeroservoelastic software package for wind turbine analysis with the ability to be coupled to the hydrodynamic model. Finally, this paper focuses on the structural engineering that was performed as part of the feasibility study conducted for qualification of the technology. Specifically, the preliminary scantling is described and the strength and fatigue analysis methodologies are explained, focusing on the following aspects: The coupling between the wind turbine and the hull and the interface between the hydrodynamic loading and the structural response.

406 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a notional design of this type of nanofluid receiver is presented, and the authors show a theoretical improvement in efficiency of up to 10% as compared to surface-based collectors when solar concentration ratios are in the range of 100-1000.
Abstract: Concentrated solar energy has become the input for an increasing number of experimental and commercial thermal systems over the past 10–15 years [M. Thirugnanasambandam et al., Renewable Sustainable Energy Rev. 14 (2010)]. Recent papers have indicated that the addition of nanoparticles to conventional working fluids (i.e., nanofluids) can improve heat transfer and solar collection [H. Tyagi et al., J. Sol. Energy Eng. 131, 4 (2009); P. E. Phelan et al., Annu. Rev. Heat Transfer 14 (2005)]. This work indicates that power tower solar collectors could benefit from the potential efficiency improvements that arise from using a nanofluid working fluid. A notional design of this type of nanofluid receiver is presented. Using this design, we show a theoretical nanofluid enhancement in efficiency of up to 10% as compared to surface-based collectors when solar concentration ratios are in the range of 100–1000. Furthermore, our analysis shows that graphite nanofluids with volume fractions on the order of 0.001% or l...

357 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202379
2022152
2021158
2020154
2019194
2018296