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JournalISSN: 0733-9445

Journal of Structural Engineering-asce 

American Society of Civil Engineers
About: Journal of Structural Engineering-asce is an academic journal published by American Society of Civil Engineers. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Buckling & Beam (structure). It has an ISSN identifier of 0733-9445. Over the lifetime, 9181 publications have been published receiving 322875 citations. The journal is also known as: ASCE journal of structural engineering & ASCE structural engineering.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a stress-strain model for concrete subjected to uniaxial compressive loading and confined by transverse reinforcement is developed for concrete sections with either spiral or circular hoops, or rectangular hoops with or without supplementary cross ties.
Abstract: A stress‐strain model is developed for concrete subjected to uniaxial compressive loading and confined by transverse reinforcement. The concrete section may contain any general type of confining steel: either spiral or circular hoops; or rectangular hoops with or without supplementary cross ties. These cross ties can have either equal or unequal confining stresses along each of the transverse axes. A single equation is used for the stress‐strain equation. The model allows for cyclic loading and includes the effect of strain rate. The influence of various types of confinement is taken into account by defining an effective lateral confining stress, which is dependent on the configuration of the transverse and longitudinal reinforcement. An energy balance approach is used to predict the longitudinal compressive strain in the concrete corresponding to first fracture of the transverse reinforcement by equating the strain energy capacity of the transverse reinforcement to the strain energy stored in the concret...

6,261 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a model for evaluating structural damage in reinforced concrete structures under earthquake ground motions is proposed, where damage is expressed as a linear function of the maximum deformation and the effect of repeated cyclic loading.
Abstract: A model for evaluating structural damage in reinforced concrete structures under earthquake ground motions is proposed. Damage is expressed as a linear function of the maximum deformation and the effect of repeated cyclic loading. Available static (monotonic) and dynamic (cyclic) test data were analyzed to evaluate the statistics of the appropriate parameters of the proposed damage model. The uncertainty in the ultimate structural capacity was also examined.

1,674 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a formal probabilistic framework for seismic design and assessment of structures and its application to steel moment-resisting frame buildings is presented, based on realizing a performance objective expressed as the probability of exceeding a specified performance level.
Abstract: This paper presents a formal probabilistic framework for seismic design and assessment of structures and its application to steel moment-resisting frame buildings. This is the probabilistic basis for the 2000 SAC Federal Emergency Management Agency ~FEMA! steel moment frame guidelines. The framework is based on realizing a performance objective expressed as the probability of exceeding a specified performance level. Performance levels are quantified as expressions relating generic structural variables ''demand'' and ''capacity'' that are described by nonlinear, dynamic displacements of the structure. Common probabilistic analysis tools are used to convolve both the randomness and uncertainty characteristics of ground motion intensity, structural ''demand,'' and structural system ''capacity'' in order to derive an expression for the probability of achieving the specified performance level. Stemming from this probabilistic framework, a safety-checking format of the conventional ''load and resistance factor'' kind is developed with load and resistance terms being replaced by the more generic terms ''demand'' and ''capacity,'' respectively. This framework also allows for a format based on quantitative confidence statements regarding the likelihood of the performance objective being met. This format has been adopted in the SAC/FEMA guidelines.

1,580 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors review the recent and rapid developments in semi-active structural control and its implementation in full-scale structures, and present an alternative to active and hybrid control for structural vibration reduction.
Abstract: In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to research and development of structural control devices, with particular emphasis on alleviation of wind and seismic response of buildings and bridges. In both areas, serious efforts have been undertaken in the last two decades to develop the structural control concept into a workable technology. Full-scale implementation of active control systems have been accomplished in several structures, mainly in Japan; however, cost effectiveness and reliability considerations have limited their wide spread acceptance. Because of their mechanical simplicity, low power requirements, and large, controllable force capacity, semiactive systems provide an attractive alternative to active and hybrid control systems for structural vibration reduction. In this paper we review the recent and rapid developments in semiactive structural control and its implementation in full-scale structures.

1,179 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a review of current anchorage strength models for both fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) and steel-to-concrete bonded joints under shear and propose a new simple and rational model based on an existing fracture mechanics analysis and experimental observations.
Abstract: External bonding of steel plates has been used to strengthen deficient reinforced-concrete structures since the 1960s. In recent years, fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) plates have been increasingly used to replace steel plates due to their superior properties. A key issue in the design of an effective retrofitting solution using externally bonded plates is the end anchorage strength. This paper first presents a review of current anchorage strength models for both FRP-to-concrete and steel-to-concrete bonded joints under shear. These models are then assessed with experimental data collected from the literature, revealing the deficiencies of all existing models. Finally, a new simple and rational model is proposed based on an existing fracture mechanics analysis and experimental observations. This new model not only matches experimental observations of bond strength closely, but also correctly predicts the effective bond length. The new model is thus suitable for practical application in the design of FRP-to-concrete as well as steel-to-concrete bonded joints.

1,050 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
2023210
2022344
2021310
2020385
2019225
2018293