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Showing papers in "Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society in 1939"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, it is shown that the ships plying in the Arabian Sea in 1250-1350 were structurally weak, and the question whether this feature persisted until 1500 must be answered almost exclusively from the early Portuguese literature.
Abstract: It is clear then that the ships plying in the Arabian Sea in 1250–1350 were structurally weak. The question whether this feature persisted until 1500 must be answered almost exclusively from the early Portuguese literature. It is very voluminous; most of it is either badly indexed or not indexed at all; and I have not been able to search it all through, but have looked only in the likely places. My collection of passages may thus be incomplete, while those I have found are mostly fragmentary, and to interpret them itis necessary to have a general view of the course of shipping in the Arabian Sea.

32 citations


Journal ArticleDOI

20 citations











Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Abu Ja'far Muḥammad b. Ḥabib, al-Hâ sh imi al-Ba gh dâdi as he is usually called, was a mawlâ of the family of the author of the Kitâb al-muḥabbar.
Abstract: Unfortunately very little is known about the life and personality of the author of the Kitâb al-muḥabbar . Abu Ja‘far Muḥammad b. Ḥabib, al-Hâ sh imi al-Ba gh dâdi as he is usually called, was a mawlâ of the family of Muḥammad b. 'Abbâs b. Muḥammad al-Hâ sh imi. Ḥabib is stated to be the name of his mother, a freed woman of the Hâ sh imite family, his father's name being unknown. However, in the Fihrist and by Yâqut who quotes the Fihrist he is called Muḥammad b. Ḥabib b. Umaiya b. 'Amr. The date and the place of his birth are equally unknown and the only date we know for certain is that of his death, which occurred in Sâmarrâa in the year a.h. 245 (a.d. 859/860) in the reign of al-Mutawakkil. All the sources agree about this date, some adding the month, Dh u'l-Ḥijja, and the day, namely the 23rd of this month.



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The only known copy of the oldest mystic book on the subject of love, the k. 'aṭf al-alif al-ma'lūf 'alā' l-l-lǫm al ma'ṭūf of Abū'l-Ḥasan 'Alī b. Muḥammad al-Dailamī, was discovered by Ritter as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: H. Ritter has referred again to the Arabian manuscript Tubingen Weisweiler, nr. 81, in Islam, 21 (1933), p. 91. It contains the only copy hitherto known of the oldest mystic book on the subject of love, the k. 'aṭf al-alif al-ma'lūf 'alā' l-lām al ma'ṭūf of Abū'l-Ḥasan 'Alī b. Muḥammad al-Dailamī. The year of al-Dailamī's death has hitherto not been established; he was a pupil and the rāwī of the well-known author on mysticism, Abū 'Abdallāh Muhammad b. Khafīf (died 371 h. = a.d. 981), therefore probably one of the older contemporaries of Ibn Sīna (died 428 h. = a.d. 1037). A year ago, Dr. Arberry kindly drew my attention to the fact that this manuscript contained some quotations of ancient authors which could not be traced and which might be worth considering. The opinions of the astronomers, scientists, and on love are discussed in the first part of the book; the passage on the scientists (32b 7–33b 9) is specially interesting, as it offers two hitherto absolutely unknown fragments, one of the last century of the Alexandrian-Greek literature, the other very probably of a lost dialogue of Aristotle.









Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A Glance at the recently published African Native Music: An Annotated Bibliography (London, 1936) reveals the fact that early references to the music of negro and negroid peoples are rare as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: A Glance at the recently published African Native Music: An Annotated Bibliography (London, 1936), will reveal the fact that early references to the music of negro and negroid peoples are rare. Indeed, in this very useful bibliography no work earlier than the seventeenth century is quoted. The truth is that many early references have been neglected. It may be admitted that these neglected references occur in Arabic works, but most of these have been translated into European languages, so that they are available to the general musicographer.





Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This manuscript is written in the rather inelegant "Bihari" hand, which C. Stewart quite properly described as a branch of the Cufick hand as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: This manuscript is written in the rather inelegant “Bihari” hand, which C. Stewart quite properly described as “a branch of the Cufick”. The scribe has used a curious colour-scheme for each page, writing line 1 in blue, line 2 in red, lines 3–6 in black, line 7 in red, line 8 in blue, line 9 in red, lines 10–13 in black, line 14 in red, and line 15 in blue: the garish effect is further accentuated by the use of gilt ornaments to mark the verses, sections, etc., and by a minute Persian interlineary translation in red ink. There are rather crude ornamental panels on foil. 1–2, 199–200 (beginning of S. xix), and 412–13. The pages are somewhat damaged by damp, and some have been torn and inexpertly mended. The binding is Indian, of about 1830.