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Showing papers in "Journal of Writing in Creative Practice in 2012"




Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examine the emergence of meaning and its attendant orderings through a lens of the making of the work, arguing that the true nature of a text is in the subjectivity brought to it by the reader/viewer.
Abstract: This paper interrogates the possibilities of forms that redirect content; how formal composition can indicate illustrations’ content and further meaning. Sue Coe remarks in Eye, ‘The future will not be static. The demand for visual imagery will be colossal. … the visual essay offers up a unique respite. Art is about slowing time down, not speeding it up.’(1999) This paper engages with the agency that pictures have over the text normatively delineating their meaning., I examine the emergence of meaning and its attendant orderings through a lens of ‘the making of the work.’ The paper will draw upon a wide awareness of the possibilities offered by the dynamics of picture-making and picture-presentation; connections are no less truthful if normative exposition cannot capture them adequately., I am interested in illustration that asks the audience to engage in meaning-making; how illustrators enable audiences to be able to make connective, interpretational leaps. Barthes describes the necessity of subjective engagement with the work – an immersivity of the image which creates validity in the viewer’s own response. I argue the true nature of a text is in the subjectivity brought to it by the reader/viewer. Meaning is unfixed and yet more specific for it; this paper attests to the validity and vitality of personal readings. As Luborsky suggests, ‘The picture does not relate to the text; it’s the reader who does the relating by attending to the fit between image and text.’ The formal particularity of my work’s making defines and is defined by its audience. I demonstrate the artistic potential of ‘audience’ in formal engagements which liberate spectatorship from the customary role of ‘market segment’ or outsider/other.

4 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper explored the relation between facts and fictions in diasporic stories, highlighting two central conundrums that they have encountered in their research: what is experienced and lived but cannot be said/told; what is told but not necessarily lived.
Abstract: This collaborative article explores some commonalities to be found in narrative methods used by Caribbeanist, Joan Anim-Addo and sociologist, Yasmin Gunaratnam. Recognizing how narrative and stories are socially inflected and relational, our work with diasporic stories approaches narrative as an unstable and evolving event that poses its own ethical provocations. We discuss the limits of our respective methods – oral history and biographical narrative interviews – through an exploration of ‘secrets and lies’ in the telling and relaying of stories. We consider, centrally, the relations between facts and fictions in diasporic stories, highlighting two central conundrums that we have encountered in our research: (i) what is experienced and lived but cannot be said/told; (ii) what is told but not necessarily lived. Creolization theory and notions of cultural hybridity serve to frame the conversation that we engage.

3 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors describe the nature and role of the "context essay" which is written as part of final projects on both UG and PG degrees in Goldsmiths Design Department.
Abstract: This paper initially articulates Derrida’s attempt to overcome the distantiation of writing from the thing written about - which, he addresses in his essay-poem ‘Che cos’e la poesia?’ (‘What is poetry?’). Thereafter, using the herisson (hedgehog/porcupine) of this essay-poem as touchstone, the paper goes on to describe the nature and role of the ‘context essay’ which is written as part of final projects on both UG and PG degrees in Goldsmiths Design Department. The context essay challenges the borders between different types of writing and design practice, and is an essential part of the design process of the students’ final projects. The last part of the paper sketches the different ideational stratagems that may be used in the content and in the form of the context essay; stratagems that inter-ventilate different theories (accounts), different practices (acts), inter-splice theories and practices and, of course, also utilise the technicity of writing itself (applied grammatology) to open up the possibilities of design practice.

2 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Using an adapted narrative enquiry approach, this article presented a model of criticality based on R. Rogoff's argument that criticality should create epistemological and ontological disturbance in the minds and in the being of students.
Abstract: Using an adapted narrative enquiry approach, the purpose of the research is to present a model of criticality based on R. Barnett’s argument that criticality should ‘create epistemological and ontological disturbance in the minds and in the being of students’, which Barnett argues is a prerequisite to critical being, or in I. Rogoff’s terms, a ‘critical embodiment’. Inevitably, such a conceptualization involves a reformation of the student’s subject position including their sense of identity and it is clear that despite the ‘messy’ data provided by these unstructured narrative interviews with two international fine art students, there is evidence for Barnett’s and Rogoff’s positions. Indeed, identity is central to the practice of both participants who articulate their sense of othering in Foucauldian terms, operating at a very cognitive level within a western regime of truth.

2 citations




Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Phi Books project as mentioned in this paper has used the house as a metaphor for interdisciplinary collaboration by using narrative, making and performance to explore how borders, walls and doors facilitate collaboration, which has lead to the production of books and interactive material produced by the authors and the participants.
Abstract: The Phi Books have used the house as a metaphor for interdisciplinary collaboration by using narrative, making and performance to explore how borders, walls and doors facilitate collaboration. This has lead to the production of books and interactive material produced by the authors and the participants, which are both fictional and imaginative while also being methodologically reflective. We would like to present the development of the Phi Books Project, showing its different stages, from the initial formulation of algorithmic fictions to technologically mediated and embodied systems for collaboration.


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a collaborative article deconstructs the term temporality and refashions it as temp(oralities), defined not only as the Caribbean artist/writer seeking to articulate a sense of time and/or timelessness, but also in the sense of the fragmented nature of time, and the orality of the region that the artists always seek to interject into their work.
Abstract: In the article ‘Writing: Explicating and unfolding condensed textual practices in art and design’ Sean Hall explores and questions our contemporary relationship with time in relation to the practice of writing. Our modern world in a western context, has left us Hall argues, feeling ‘temporally impoverished’. This collaborative article deconstructs the term temporality and refashions it as temp(oralities). Our temp(oralities) is defined not only as the Caribbean artist/writer seeking to articulate a sense of time and/or timelessness, but also in the sense of the fragmented nature of time and the orality of the region that the Caribbean artist/writer always seek to interject into their work. Using Hall’s idea of time, and the notion that we are ‘all in search of lost time’ as our point of departure, this article aims to explore the relationship between temp(orality) and the Caribbean artist/writer. We engage with the absent and fragmented historical narratives of the region to explore how Caribbean artists/writers have attempted to articulate their own sense of time and/or timelessness. For the Caribbean artist/writer, modernity is paradoxical. It is both the violent movement away from traditional European and African ideals, and the awareness of the intrinsic nature between the Caribbean, Africa and Europe. What implications does this fraught relationship have on the artistic and literary representation of a Caribbean timescape? If as we are arguing, Caribbean artists/writers work in multiple temp(oralities) how does this affect how we the reader/viewer consume and understand their work?


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Art writing that works with a model of singularity does not deny the importance of context, but downplays its influence by privileging the agency of the work of art as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: A given for art writing today is the necessity of contextualization. This assumption is put to the test when the singularity of a work of art is privileged over its specificity. If the latter infers a context-directed situation in which a cultural object, event or situation is determined by the conditions of its appearance in a particular context, and in which it is invariably subject to certain predominant, context-specific models of interpretation, the former denotes a model whereby a cultural object, event or situation creates its own conditions of reception and establishes its own interpretative frameworks. Art writing that works with a model of singularity does not deny the importance of context, but downplays its influence by privileging the agency of the work of art. This becomes problematic for art criticism when the context appears to play more of a determining role than usual. Such a situation is raised whenever contemporary art enters the church, revealing certain refusals and strategies of avoidance within the secular art press.



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that the knowledge that artists, designers, typographers and illustrators bring is that the material word is a crucial partner in the production of meaning, by engaging with those practitioners whose work interfaces with these concerns, both directly and indirectly.
Abstract: It is with the materiality of language, or Materia Prima, that this article concerns itself, reflecting upon the ‘surface’ of text, as an image in its own right. The oral or spoken/auditory/acoustic qualities of language have long been held to be aesthetically central to literature and poetry. The philosopher Richard Shusterman describes this phenomenon as a lack of attention to those instances when the ‘visible is visible’, this phrase relying upon a distinction between two meanings of the word ‘visible’. The first suggests being ‘able to be seen’, while the second suggests the ‘conspicuous’ or ‘strikingly manifest’ aspect(s) of the seen (or passive and active modes of the visible). The printed surface of language, where the ‘visible is visible’, has traditionally been viewed as irrelevant in philosophical accounts of language, from Plato to Wittgenstein, where, frequently, language is broken down only into ‘the sound aspect’ and ‘the meaning aspect’. However, this article will argue that the knowledge that artists, designers, typographers and illustrators bring is that the material word is a crucial partner in the production of meaning, by engaging with those practitioners whose work interfaces with these concerns, both directly and indirectly.