scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
JournalISSN: 0738-2480

Law and History Review 

Cambridge University Press
About: Law and History Review is an academic journal published by Cambridge University Press. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Politics & Common law. It has an ISSN identifier of 0738-2480. Over the lifetime, 1023 publications have been published receiving 11297 citations.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors discuss the law and order in the realm of theory and the rule of law in an Athenian society, and discuss the legal regulation of sexual violence.
Abstract: Preface Part I. The Realm of Theory: 1. Law and order 2. Theorising Athenian society: the problem of stability 3. Theorising Athenian society: the rule of law Part II. The Realm of the Courts: 4. Rhetoric, litigation and the values of an agonistic society 5. Litigation as feud 6. Violence and litigation 7. Hubris and the legal regulation of sexual violence 8. Litigation and the family Conclusion: litigation, democracy and the courts Bibliographical essay Bibliography Index.

153 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A leading scholar of constitutional law, Akhil Reed Amar as mentioned in this paper, argues that the present character of the Bill of Rights owes more to antislavery activists of the Reconstruction era than to the Founding Fathers who created the Bill.
Abstract: A leading scholar of constitutional law delivers an incisive and brilliant new account of the Bill of Rights and explodes conventional wisdom about our most basic charter of liberty. Akhil Reed Amar not only illuminates the text, structure, and history of the 1789 Bill but also argues that its present character owes more to antislavery activists of the Reconstruction era than to the Founding Fathers who created the Bill.

147 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Border Patrol was described as a scouting organization and a pursuit organization by the commissioner general of the United States Department of the Border Patrol, who testified before a closed session of the House Immigration Committee as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: In January 1930 officials of the Bureau of Immigration testified about the Border Patrol before a closed session of the House Immigration Committee. Henry Hull, the commissioner general of immigration, explained that the Border Patrol did not operate “on the border line” but as far as one hundred miles “back of the line.” The Border Patrol, he said, was “a scouting organization and a pursuit organization…. [Officers] operate on roads without warrants and wherever they find an alien they stop him. If he is illegally in the country, they take him to unit headquarters.”

125 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The British treated Australia as terra nullius, as unowned land as mentioned in this paper, and the doctrine remained the law in Australia throughout the colonial period, and indeed right up to 1992.
Abstract: The British treated Australia as terra nullius—as unowned land. Under British colonial law, aboriginal Australians had no property rights in the land, and colonization accordingly vested ownership of the entire continent in the British government. The doctrine of terra nullius remained the law in Australia throughout the colonial period, and indeed right up to 1992.

122 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202358
2022117
202124
202034
201932
201824