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Showing papers in "Library Management in 2017"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Featuring the three leadership modes brings librarians’ attention to the crucial differences among them; and hence directs future discussion to a more focused approach that addresses each leadership mode specifically.
Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to highlight academic librarians’ understanding of leadership and leadership development, with the aim to shed light on further research that can inform and improve practices. Design/methodology/approach A literature review on academic library leadership was conducted. Particular attention was placed on the three common leadership modes in academic libraries: emergent leadership, team leadership and headship. The review covers librarians’ conception of leadership, desirable leadership capabilities and existing leadership development. Findings Librarians view leadership as a process of influence, and understand that leadership does not only come from formal leaders. Lacking is a more structured knowledge of what constitute effect leadership. In the literature, team and emergent leadership have not been adequately explored; most leadership research in the field takes on a headship approach. Research limitations/implications The publications reviewed were selective; not all papers on the topic were included. Practical implications Featuring the three leadership modes brings librarians’ attention to the crucial differences among them; and hence directs future discussion to a more focused approach that addresses each leadership mode specifically. Originality/value This paper differs from previous literature reviews on library leadership; it is the first one comparing and contrasting publications using the three leadership modes.

36 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A new approach to education for library/information students in data literacy – the principles and practice of data collection, manipulation and management – as a part of the Masters programmes in library and information science at City, University of London is described.
Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe a new approach to education for library/information students in data literacy – the principles and practice of data collection, manipulation and management – as a part of the Masters programmes in library and information science (CityLIS) at City, University of London. Design/methodology/approach The course takes a socio-technical approach, integrating, and giving equal importance to, technical and social/ethical aspects. Topics covered include: the relation between data, information and documents; representation of digital data; network technologies; information architecture; metadata; data structuring; search engines, databases and specialised retrieval tools; text and data mining, web scraping; data cleaning, manipulation, analysis and visualisation; coding; data metrics and analytics; artificial intelligence; data management and data curation; data literacy and data ethics; and constructing data narratives. Findings The course, which was well received by students in its first iteration, gives a basic grounding in data literacy, to be extended by further study, professional practice and lifelong learning. Originality/value This is one of the first accounts of an introductory course to equip all new entrants to the library/information professions with the understanding and skills to take on roles in data librarianship and data management.

25 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe an analysis of the competency profiles of librarians, records managers, information managers, archivists, and knowledge managers and provide a competency profile for information specialists that incorporates the knowledge and competencies from all of these areas.
Abstract: Purpose Librarians are increasingly involved in projects and teams that require them to exhibit a broad range of knowledge and competencies which extend beyond traditional librarianship to include aspects of records management, information management, and knowledge management. In effect, librarians need to be information specialists, but the task of broadening one’s knowledge and competencies may be daunting, and it is helpful to explore the competencies of these various information disciplines as a guideline for competency development. The purpose of this paper is to provide some insights into the shared competencies and knowledge of these disciplines. Design/methodology/approach This paper describes an analysis of the competency profiles of librarians, records managers, information managers, archivists, and knowledge managers and provides a competency profile for information specialists that incorporates the knowledge and competencies from all of these areas. The sources used for this analysis were existing competency profiles developed by professional associations and employers of information workers such as government agencies. Findings The analysis resulted in the development of a competencies list which includes five competencies groups. These competency groups are: collaboration, client service, and communication; organizational understanding and strategic alignment; programme and service delivery and management; records, information, and knowledge management technical competencies; and personal qualities. Practical implications This analysis may be useful for librarians or library students who are determining which professional development opportunities to undertake as well as for managers who are seeking to define job profiles for their library staff in today’s complex information environment. Originality/value This paper bridges the disciplines of librarianship, information management, records management, archives, and knowledge management by comparing their relative competency profiles in order to create a set of competencies that are common to all disciplines.

24 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present findings from a multinational survey on copyright literacy of specialists from libraries and other cultural institutions in 13 countries, namely Bulgaria (BG), Croatia (CR), Finland (FI), France (FR), Hungary (HU), Lithuania (LT), Mexico (MX), Norway (NO), Portugal (PT), Romania (RO), Turkey (TR), UK and USA in the period July 2013-March 2015.
Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present findings from a multinational survey on copyright literacy of specialists from libraries and other cultural institutions Design/methodology/approach This paper is based on a multinational survey of copyright literacy competencies of Library and Information Science (LIS) professionals and those who work in the cultural heritage sector (archives and museums), conducted in 13 countries, namely Bulgaria (BG), Croatia (CR), Finland (FI), France (FR), Hungary (HU), Lithuania (LT), Mexico (MX), Norway (NO), Portugal (PT), Romania (RO), Turkey (TR), UK and USA in the period July 2013-March 2015 An online survey instrument was developed in order to collect data from professionals regarding their familiarity with, knowledge and awareness of, and opinions on copyright-related issues Findings Findings of this study highlight gaps in existing knowledge of copyright, and information about the level of copyright literacy of LIS and cultural sector professionals Also attitudes toward copyright learning content in academic education and continuing professional development training programs are investigated Originality/value This study aimed to address a gap in the literature by encompassing specialists from the cultural institutions in an international comparative context The paper offers guidance for further understanding of copyright in a wider framework of digital and information literacy; and for the implementation of copyright policy, and the establishment of copyright advisor positions in cultural institutions The recommendations support a revision of academic and continuing education programs learning curriculum and methods

23 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explored the professional experiences of copyright of a group of academic librarians in the UK, with a view to devising appropriate copyright education strategies, concluding that librarian need to be taught about copyright in a way that acknowledges and addresses the challenges so that they can view it as empowering and as part of wider information literacy initiatives.
Abstract: Purpose Librarians and information professionals increasingly need to deal with copyright issues in their work, however evidence suggests that they can lack confidence and often refer queries to a dedicated copyright specialist. The purpose of this paper is to explore the professional experiences of copyright of a group of academic librarians in the UK, with a view to devising appropriate copyright education strategies. Design/methodology/approach The research was conducted using phenomenography, which is a qualitative approach from education. Data were collected though group interviews to explore the variation of experience. Four categories of description were devised which are placed in an outcome space. Findings There were four qualitatively distinct ways that librarians experience copyright in their professional lives, including viewing it as a problem, as complicated, as a known entity and as an opportunity. The variations in experience relate to a variety of factors such as the librarians’ role, ideology, level of experience, context and with whom they might be dealing. Originality/value This is the first study of this nature, building on quantitative findings from a multinational survey. It concludes that librarians need to be taught about copyright in a way that acknowledges and addresses the challenges so that they can view it as empowering and as part of wider information literacy initiatives.

23 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: How this novel library digital service motivates students’ learning is examined, and managerial issues related to the introduction of 3D printing services at a medium-size urban community college library with restricted funding are investigated.
Abstract: Purpose One of the most innovative library services recently introduced by public and academic libraries, the technology of 3D printing, has the potential to be used in multiple educational settings. The purpose of this paper is to examine how this novel library digital service motivates students’ learning, and to investigate managerial issues related to the introduction of 3D printing services at a medium-size urban community college library with restricted funding. Design/methodology/approach Since Fall 2014, the LaGuardia Library Media Resources Center has been offering a portable consumer-end 3D printer for classroom use. This paper provides historical context for the implementation of 3D printing as a service offered by librarians and discusses how the community college library managed 3D printing services to support class curriculum. At the end of the three-semester-long project students were asked to volunteer to take a survey conducted by the librarian and the class instructor. Findings The results of the student survey demonstrated that library 3D printing services significantly promoted students’ motivation to learn. The conceptual model of a makerspace should be an essential part of the twenty-first century academic library. To help make that possible this paper examines certain challenges and limitations faced by librarians when introducing 3D printing, including dedicated space management, professional education, and personnel availability. Originality/value During the project described students were able to use library services to print out and study complex engineering and biology models in 3D. The proper planning and management of this innovative service allows academic librarians to enhance class curriculum by providing the means of transforming theory into physical reality.

17 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examined the access and use of the institutional repository (IR) among academic staff at Egerton University and provided suggestions on how best to enhance access and utilization of the IR among the academic staff.
Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the access and use of the institutional repository (IR) among academic staff at Egerton University. Design/methodology/approach The paper provides a description of the building and development of the IR at the Egerton university and describes expected benefits of the repository to the University and relevant stakeholders. A survey was conducted among 84 academic staff with an aim of examining their levels of awareness on the existence of the IR at the Egerton University and assess their access and use. Through a structured questionnaire both quantitative and qualitative data were collected. Findings The study revealed that majority of the academic staff at the Egerton University are still not aware of the existence of the IR. Staff also faced challenges in accessing and using the content available. The paper provided suggestions on how best to enhance the access and utilization of the IRs among the academic staff. Practical implications From a practical point of view, the paper provides implications on the access and use of IRs by the academic staff. The paper points out some challenges faced by this group of users which other academic institutions may try to solve in their respective contexts. Originality/value Findings and discussions provided in the paper will pave way to solving the challenges faced in access and use of IR by the academic staff at the Egerton University.

15 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Ethnographic research methods gave more inroads into finding the story behind the LIDP than quantitative research methods, and found that students are unaware of the research help that they can get from their academic library.
Abstract: Purpose Phase two of the JISC funded Library Impact Data Project (LIDP) identified low library usage amongst Chinese students in comparison to their UK peers. Further research was needed to help the authors delve deeper and find out the story behind the data. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach A questionnaire was distributed to all international students in the Business School to learn about their information retrieval behaviours. The response was high but the survey was deliberately designed to only produce quantitative data, and the paper highlights the limitations of this data. More research using qualitative ethnography research techniques was needed to gather qualitative data to create a broader picture of student practice. Methods utilised included the retrospective process interview and cognitive mapping (both used by Andrew Asher in the ERIAL project). Questions from the survey were sometimes used as prompts in the qualitative process. Findings The data are still to be coded and analysed but one of the main findings is that students are unaware of the research help that they can get from their academic library. Ethnographic research methods gave more inroads into finding the story behind the LIDP than quantitative research methods. Originality/value Ethnographic research in libraries is still in its early days in the UK. It could help those library professionals who are hoping to practice similar research methods.

15 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors study the factors influencing the resistance of the employees of Tehran University libraries to technological changes and provide a suitable understanding of these factors for the managers so that they would be able to reduce the resistance to change among the employees in university libraries.
Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to study the factors influencing the resistance of the employees of Tehran University libraries to technological changes. Through achieving this aim, it attempts to provide a suitable understanding of these factors for the managers so that they would be able to reduce the resistance to change among the employees of university libraries. Design/methodology/approach This study is a descriptive survey in its data collection method. Based on the review of the literature, a questionnaire on resistance to technological changes was devised (Cronbach’s α coefficient being 93 percent). The questionnaire was distributed among 128 of the employees in the technology section of Tehran University libraries, and the achieved data were analyzed using an SPSS and PLS. Findings The findings achieved through a confirmatory factor analysis showed 11 elements of ambiguity, threat of the current situation, habit, lack of interest, the need for relearning, unsuitable understanding, inefficient rewarding system, emotional reactions, lack of interest understanding, inflexibility of the beliefs and feeling of being a veteran in the organization, which influence the resistance of the employees of the university libraries, among them the inefficient rewarding system ranks first and the unsuitable understanding ranks last. Originality/value In this research, an attempt is made to identify the resistance to technological changes shown by the employees of Tehran University libraries, which can be a guide for library managers to improve the changing process in their libraries. Influencing factors of resistance to change which had been identified by other research works were examined here regarding the circumstances of Tehran University Libraries.

14 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This study shows a very weak link between college or university mission statements and library mission statements in the majority of cases.
Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to determine how academic library mission statements are related to their parent institution mission statements. Design/methodology/approach Using a random sample of the US colleges and universities, library and their respective college or university mission statements were compared using discourse analysis. Findings This study shows a very weak link between college or university mission statements and library mission statements in the majority of cases. Originality/value This paper opens a discussion of the value and purpose of library mission statements with the context of parent institution mission statements.

13 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated the impact of students' exploration on their academic performance by incorporating two sequential mediators, namely, information seeking and academic self-efficacy, to provide a better understanding of this relationship.
Abstract: Purpose Substantial empirical research has addressed the antecedents of students’ academic performance. Building on these insights, the purpose of this paper is to extend the related literature by investigating the impact of students’ exploration on their academic performance. Furthermore, to provide a better understanding of this relationship the authors incorporate two sequential mediators, namely, information seeking and academic self-efficacy. Design/methodology/approach Quantitative approach using self-report questionnaires. This study was conducted in the Hellenic Open University through a specially designed questionnaire. The authors collected data from 248 students attending a postgraduate course in Healthcare Management. Findings The results showed that information seeking and in turn academic self-efficacy mediate the positive association between exploration and academic performance. Both theoretical and practical implications are also discussed. Originality/value Students’ exploration plays an important role in enhancing both their information seeking and self-efficacy which in turn affects their academic performance.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The findings of the study revealed that professionals were satisfied with CEP attendance; keen on gaining more knowledge and transferring the acquired knowledge and skills at their workplaces and interested in implementing the learning to achieve results.
Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to report the research findings of an evaluation of the impact of continuing education programs (CEPs) on library information science (LIS) professionals of academic libraries in Mumbai, India. The paper also introduces Donald Kirkpatrick model of training evaluation for Library Science research in the area of program evaluation. Design/methodology/approach The impact of CEPs was evaluated using Donald Kirkpatrick model of training evaluation using survey method. The impact was evaluated at four levels; reaction, learning, behavior and results. The population of the present study included 344 LIS professionals working at colleges libraries affiliated to University of Mumbai and Shreemati Nathibai Damodar Thackersey (SNDT) Women’s University in Mumbai, India. The data collected through questionnaire were supplemented by five specimen interviews of heads of institutions of the academic librarians who had attended more than five CEPs in five years, 2009-2013. Findings The findings of the study revealed that professionals were satisfied with CEP attendance; keen on gaining more knowledge and transferring the acquired knowledge and skills at their workplaces and interested in implementing the learning to achieve results. The reasons given by academic librarians on not implementing the learning in the library indicated that there were hindrances like lack of management support, lack of technical expertise, inadequate staff in the library, poor IT Infrastructure, etc. in transferring the learning at work. Research limitations/implications The study was based on self-perceptions of respondents. The limitation of self-perception was eliminated to some extent by supplementing qualitative data wherever required. CEPs included conferences, seminars, workshops, refresher courses, orientation programs and online courses. Pre-test and post-test recommended by the Kirkpatrick model could not be conducted as the researcher has not adopted experimental design. The data of feedback from the organizers and content of the CEPs attended by respondents were not analyzed in the study. Practical implications The paper describes the implementation of Kirkpatrick model to evaluate the CEPs, which can be used by the organizers or institutions to evaluate the impact of CEPs in future. This will help them to improve upon the contents of CEPs making them more relevant and effective. Social implications Evaluation of CEPs will be useful to ensure the effectiveness of CEPs and performance of LIS professionals. Originality/value This paper reports an original research initiative undertaken to evaluate the impact of CEPs attended by LIS professionals of Indian academic libraries in Mumbai, India. It fills the gap in LIS research. The application of Donald Kirkpatrick model of Training evaluation is also valuable for LIS research.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe the basic ideas of NPM, their realization in libraries and how libraries have to handle constantly reduced budgets and the risk of being closed down (especially in the “age of austerity”); the second part will show how the University of Eastern Finland (UEF) Library has managed to improve its services with the NPM approach.
Abstract: Purpose From the 1980s – in some parts of Europe from the 1990s – onward, the new public management (NPM) has been emerging in public organizations including libraries. Since then, there has been a need to develop strategies, to plan budgets and to implement cost and activity accounting as well as benchmarking to compare the library’s processes, costs and activities with those of other libraries. One basic idea of the NPM was to make a transition from focusing on how institutions function to product orientation, to improve the quality of library services, to develop output orientation and to act market and consumer oriented. There also was a need to change from bureaucratic and hierarchically acting organizations to a more modern flexible and lean form of management. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach The aim of this paper is in the first part to describe the basic ideas of NPM, their realization in libraries and how libraries have to handle constantly reduced budgets and the risk of being closed down (especially in the “age of austerity”); the second part will show how the University of Eastern Finland (UEF) Library has managed to improve its services with the NPM approach. Findings Many libraries are faced with serious financial cutbacks on the one hand and with emergent needs to (re)invest in neglected public infrastructure on the other hand. At the same time, they have to develop modern digital library services. Thus there is a need for efficiency, which is put in action via major budget cutbacks. Also many libraries have been closed down since the implementation of NPM ideas. Originality/value In this paper, the NPM tools used in the restructuring of the UEF are described and the outcome of this modern management is shown.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigate and analyze library jobs advertised by higher education institutions, newspapers and job market sites in United Arab Emirates (UAE) using summative content analysis for data collection, data analysis, evaluation and assessment.
Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate and analyze library jobs advertised by higher education institutions, newspapers and job market sites in United Arab Emirates (UAE). Design/methodology/approach The paper uses summative content analysis approach for data collection, data analysis, evaluation and assessment. It reports about the accuracy of advertisements, job titles, job categories, locations and types of libraries. Findings Higher education institutions demonstrate the highest accuracy level in advertising library jobs. Librarian emerged to be the highest advertised title by the sources. e-library executive, principal-publications and library, and primary librarian found to be the new titles in the market. The paper also found inconsistencies and lack of uniformities among the sources in using job categories to advertise library jobs. In fact, none of them used the term “library” in any category. Academic libraries recorded the highest advertised jobs compared to other types of libraries. Research limitations/implications The paper is based on library jobs advertised on the websites. Websites are only one source of library job advertisement. Practical implications The paper provides important information for librarians looking for library jobs in the Middle East as well as for library managers and decision makers who wish to recruit library professionals. Originality/value The paper represents one of the few studies conducted on library job marketing in UAE. Findings of the study may contribute to the improvement of library job marketing not only in UAE but also in the other gulf countries.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The role of Research Data Services, consisting of research data management, data curation and data stewardship, and data literacy education in supporting Research 2.0 is examined.
Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of Research Data Services (RDSs), consisting of research data management, data curation and data stewardship, and data literacy education in supporting Research 2.0. Besides this, theory and principles, as well as selected examples of best practices in the relevant fields are presented. Design/methodology/approach A literature-based overview of actual insights on tasks and roles that academic and research libraries have to fulfil in order to react to the developments generated by the appearance and growing importance of Research 2.0 is provided. Taking the wide spectre of related issues into account, the discussion is limited to RDSs. Findings Even though Research 2.0 is evolving in different countries and some local environments in dissimilar ways, its data-intensive nature requires the helping presence of academic libraries and librarians. Being an emerging phenomenon, it will undoubtedly take several different shapes as it works itself out in time, but librarians should try to discover service niches, which may not be covered by other academic organisations, or their coverage is only partial or even unsatisfactory. Research limitations/implications Taking the wide spectre of issues into account, the review of literature is limited to the period between 2014 and 2016. Originality/value The paper intends to add to the body of knowledge about the relationship between RDSs and Research 2.0, as well as about the association between the components of the former.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the role of academic librarians as change champions in an information age is explored, and five principles or 5As to guide the change process in academic libraries: alignment, accountability, agility, accessibility, and assessment.
Abstract: Purpose As is the case of all organizations, the academic library is a body reflecting the contribution of its core employees. As such, the roles performed by academic librarians are crucial to its development and existence. The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of academic librarians as change champions in an information age that has been, still is, and is expected to be continuously pervaded by varying and widespread changes in librarianship and scholarship coupled with the ever changing and expanding user needs and expectations. The paper also identifies a framework to perform this role. Design/methodology/approach This paper is informed by opinion and draws on relevant literature to highlight the current climate and what is being perceived as valuable to the future direction of academic libraries in order to bring credence to its trajectory. Findings Academic librarians must readily accept, be responsive to, and anticipate change to maintain and justify their relevance to stakeholders. Yet, anecdotal evidence suggests that not all librarians are prepared to embrace change. Practical implications Academic librarians must understand how their roles influence the decision-making processes of the stakeholders and vice versa. Originality/value The paper advances five principles or 5As to guide the change process in academic libraries: alignment, accountability, agility, accessibility, and assessment. Very briefly, it discusses the relevance of a concept referred to as the competition-collaboration continuum to further academic librarianship. These notions serve to assist academic librarians in determining the appropriate actions to be taken now.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the assessment process, organizational restructuring, and physical renovation that resulted in service desks merging in Ekstrom Library at the University of Louisville and found that comprehensive and ongoing user assessment is crucial to planning for renovations and service changes.
Abstract: Purpose To support the success of their students and faculty, libraries have to understand changing user needs. Robust user assessment programs and analysis of service patterns can reveal many of those needs. Many libraries have responded to changing user expectations by consolidating service desks and providing better organization of user services. Recent advances in assessment have added to libraries’ capacity to refine the scope and goals of service desk mergers. Assessment and analysis support better conceptual frameworks for realigning organizational structures and overarching service models. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach Using a renovation and organizational restructuring in Ekstrom Library at the University of Louisville as a case study, this paper examines the assessment process, organizational restructuring, and physical renovation that resulted in service desks merging. Findings This study found that comprehensive and ongoing user assessment is crucial to planning for renovations and service changes. User needs awareness must then be linked with organizational models and service delivery systems. Service desk mergers will be successful when they result from thoughtful assessment and analysis. Research limitations/implications Other case studies with assessment driven renovation projects, service desk mergers, and organizational changes would be useful to add to these findings. Practical implications This paper provides a process and framework for library leadership who are evaluating and revising service delivery models. Originality/value The perspectives and process described in this case study will be of value to improve library service delivery models.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Initial findings indicate that the CID studio is a good fit within the library space as learning activities in it support collaboration, discovery, and integration of library services, however, noise issues, equipment needs, and expansion of space are key future needs.
Abstract: Purpose This presentation describes the efforts to set up a Creativity, Innovation, and Design (CID) studio within an academic library. The presentation will describe the reasons for creating a CID studio, assessment of the pilot study, and next steps. Design/methodology/approach The assessment used surveys, interviews, focus groups and observations of students and faculty to determine how well the CID fits into the library. Findings Initial findings indicate that the CID studio is a good fit within the library space as learning activities in it support collaboration, discovery, and integration of library services. However, noise issues, equipment needs, and expansion of space are key future needs. Research limitations/implications As libraries move from simple repositories of information to places of learning and collaboration, a CID studio space provides an opportunity to integrate learning opportunities with library services. Originality/value Through the first iteration, the CID has a unique and purpo...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigate the library employment in UAE and explore the perceptions of academic librarians toward job satisfaction, employment opportunities, employment challenges, and future actions needed to improve employment opportunities for library staff in UAE.
Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the library employment in UAE and explore the perceptions of academic librarians toward job satisfaction, employment opportunities, employment challenges, and future actions needed to improve employment opportunities for librarians in UAE. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected through an online survey questionnaire. A total of 62 academic librarians from public and private universities and colleges participated in the study. The collected data are analyzed to answer research questions and verify the hypotheses. Findings Respondents expressed high satisfaction with salary and benefits, job positions, responsibilities given to them, and appreciations from senior management. However, they are found unsatisfied with promotion policies and employment opportunity. They reported challenges for getting jobs and expressed concerns about the future of librarians in UAE. With the exception of experience, findings of the study show no significant difference of demographic factors on job satisfaction, the perceived employment opportunity, and challenges. Majority of participants believe that employment opportunity for librarians can be improved through IT courses, promotion policies, training, career structure, marketing, and changing school name. They agree that reducing the number of students will not improve employment opportunities for librarians. Research limitations/implications This is a descriptive study based on a survey questionnaire. Future studies may use qualitative methods such as the interview for more exploration and in-depth analysis. Practical implications The findings provide concerns about the future of librarianship in UAE and appeal to library educators, managers, and decision makers to improve employment opportunities for librarians. Originality/value The paper reports original research findings on job satisfaction, employment opportunities, employment challenges, and future actions as perceived by academic librarians in UAE.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Business process modelling for academic libraries is examined, focusing on the process architecture, as a way of visualizing, understanding and documenting processes.
Abstract: Purpose Academic libraries have witnessed huge changes due to internal and external factors. Recent evidence shows that there is a lack of interest in process analysis within academic libraries. There is a lot written on the need to change academic libraries but there is little analytical research that investigates processes, in terms of the process architecture. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach The modelling tool used is Architecture of Integrated Information Systems (ARIS). Findings ARIS can provide a process architecture and design for academic libraries that might raise questions later about procedures and some inefficiencies. Research limitations/implications Library managers might need to learn new techniques. Originality/value There is a lot written on the need to change academic libraries but there is little analytical research that investigates processes, in terms of the process architecture. This research examines business process modelling for academic libraries, focusing on the process architecture, as a way of visualizing, understanding and documenting processes.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the nature of professionalism within Library and Information Science (LIS) and in doing so draw comparisons with the education and medicine professions, concluding with a reflection on the future of professional knowledge development within LIS.
Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of professionalism within Library and Information Science (LIS) and in doing so draw comparisons with the education and medicine professions. Design/methodology/approach The paper provides a review of the extant literature from the three professions and gives a brief review of the theoretical constructs of professional knowledge using the work of Eisner and Eraut to explore knowledge types. It then relates these definitions to knowledge use within LIS, education and medicine, before examining the roles that professional associations have on the knowledge development of a profession. It concludes with a reflection on the future of professionalism within LIS. Findings The literature suggests a fragmented epistemological knowledge-base and threats to its practices from outside professions. It does, however, find opportunities to redefine its knowledge boundaries within the phronetic practices of LIS and in socio-cultural uses of knowledge. It finds strengths and weaknesses in professionalism within LIS and its practitioners. Originality/value This review provides a contemporary update to several earlier, related, works and provides useful context to current efforts to professionalise LIS by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a case study of an academic library in which alignment with the university mission and strategic plan and alignment of library assessment efforts with the broader culture of assessment at the university have resulted in positive gains for the library in terms of campus engagement and recognition of library value is presented.
Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore ways in which “library value” may be communicated in a university setting through more effective engagement with strategic planning and a broader array of campus partners. Design/methodology/approach This paper presents a case study of an academic library in which alignment with the university mission and strategic plan and alignment of library assessment efforts with the broader culture of assessment at the university have resulted in positive gains for the library in terms of campus engagement and recognition of library value. Findings This paper provides insights into successful strategies for improved communication of library value to senior leadership, new investment in library facilities, and enhanced opportunities for collaboration across the university on strategic initiatives including student success, innovation in teaching and scholarship, and community engagement. Originality/value This paper provides library leaders with new approaches to engagement with campus partners and senior academic leadership in promoting the library as a strategic resource worthy of investment in the twenty-first century.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore the issues surrounding professionals whose legacy skills do not align with the new directions in which the academic library is moving and examine how the disappearance of traditional roles impacts librarians and users alike.
Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues surrounding professionals whose legacy skills do not align with the new directions in which the academic library is moving. It also examines the ways in which the disappearance of traditional roles impacts librarians and users alike. Design/methodology/approach This paper considers policies for training professionals for their roles in the twenty-first century academic library sphere and identifies skills they will need for these new roles. Findings This paper provides insights into possible solutions for training librarians and library staff so that they will have necessary skills for their future roles. Originality/value This paper will provide library managers with approaches to staff training and a framework for understanding the specific skills that will be necessary for staff to possess in the twenty-first century academic library.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A situational analysis of Jamaican academic librarianship is provided, which can be used to inform future planning and management of library and information services and can inform the Latin America and Caribbean section of international library documents on trends, issues and future position of academic libraries globally.
Abstract: Academic libraries do not operate in a vacuum; they must co-exist with change and competition on all levels. In order to succeed, they must know their internal strengths in order to take advantage of opportunities, whilst avoiding threats and addressing weaknesses. A SWOT analysis of Jamaican academic libraries can yield strategic insights for academic library praxis in Jamaica, the Caribbean, and the globe. The paper aims to discuss these issues.,Survey and discussion group were engaged for the five local academic libraries in higher education in Jamaica.,Human resources and support are the most recurrent themes in the reported strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats.,This paper focused on local academic libraries in higher education (university level) in Jamaica. A survey of academic libraries at all levels, and using more detailed strategic analytical tools, would be a useful follow up.,This paper provides academic library managers and the national/regional library associations with a situational analysis of Jamaican academic librarianship, which can be used to inform future planning and management of library and information services. Additionally, the findings can inform the Latin America and Caribbean section of international library documents on trends, issues and future position of academic libraries globally.,This paper is of value as it is the first published scholarly documentation on the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats in academic librarianship in Jamaica. In this regard, it makes a useful contribution to the dearth of literature on SWOT analyses of academic libraries per country. It may also represent a starting point for looking at solutions and emerging challenges in a Caribbean academic library environment and should help to focus on the need for continuing innovation.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The current status of OH in the country is presented and new ways or initiatives to capture OH other than the traditional and usual process are presented.
Abstract: Purpose Oral histories (OHs), as primary sources of information, are used as evidences of the past and inculcate human memory. It is a real testimony of our history. However, OHs are now neglected and somehow unpopular. Strategies must be done to make sure that OH projects should continue to be used as proofs. The purpose of this paper is to go back in time and review the OH in Asia, in the Philippines, and the collection at De La Salle University. Design/methodology/approach This study explores the OH collection of the DLSU Archives. Data are extracted from the Sierra library system. Extracted subjects are arranged alphabetically. They are presented and summarized below. Historical data coming from the correspondences kept at the archives are also used to understand how the collection accumulated and how they are being organized, classified, and used by the patrons. Literature reviews are also consulted to learn more about the background of OH in the Philippines. Findings A total of 176 subjects are identified. These subjects are selected on the basis of the Library of Congress Classification Scheme which is re-categorized according to the Philippine Standard Industrial Classification to identify which type of industry does each OH belong to. The category on professional, scientific and technical activities had 30 LCC-related subjects or 16.95 percent of the total number of subjects, next is 15.25 percent or 27 LCC-related subjects which comes from the arts, entertainment and recreation, and top three is Public Administration and Defense; Compulsory Security with 10.23 percent. Research limitations/implications This paper shares the challenges and experiences of establishing and maintaining OHs. Practical implications The paper presents new ways or initiatives to capture OH other than the traditional and usual process. Social implications Oral interviews are given proper attention as part of the local history. Originality/value There is a scarcity of OH papers written by librarians; therefore, this paper presents the current status of OH in the country.

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TL;DR: In this paper, the authors identify gaps in performance of city libraries from the Czech and from the Slovak Republic engaged in the project Benchmarking of Libraries, which consists of input and output performance variables of selected 51 city libraries.
Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to identify gaps in performance of city libraries from the Czech and from the Slovak Republic engaged in the project Benchmarking of Libraries. The subject of research consists of input and output performance variables of selected 51 city libraries for the period of 2011-2015 and their mutual dependence and influence. Design/methodology/approach To analyse relationships among ten input and four output variables, the correlation and regression analyses were used. Regression analysis was focussed on four output variables – numbers of physical visitors of libraries, numbers of loans, numbers of visitors using the internet in the library, and numbers of registered readers. Interpretation of results was supplemented with classification multidimensional analysis Chi-square automatic interaction detection. Findings Findings reveal that besides others the significant gap in performance was represented by library additions, which means the renewal of library collections. Performance differences were also found between city libraries in the Czech Republic and those in the Slovak Republic. Research limitations/implications This paper evaluates gaps in the performance on representative sample of city libraries. The number of population served among individual selected 51 libraries ranges between 15 and 35 thousand inhabitants. Analysed data are from years 2011-2015. Originality/value The paper analyses, by using statistical methods, data that are generated within the benchmarking project. This methodology proves and reveals causalities among performance indicators of city libraries in an unconventional way.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A “C5 model” (clients, connectivity, content, copyright and cost) is created for the consortium management to support and improve its academic and administrative decision-making skills and optimize returns.
Abstract: Purpose This paper elicits information, an excess of information and the stakeholders’ role in the use of information. The purpose of this paper is to create a “C5 model” (clients, connectivity, content, copyright and cost) for the consortium management to support and improve its academic and administrative decision-making skills and optimize returns. Design/methodology/approach The methodology used for this study was “strength, weakness, opportunity and threat” (SWOT) analysis. As a tool, it was used as one of the strategic analytical techniques to evaluate various aspects of consortium management. The purpose of choosing this method was to derive a set of strategies for comparing the internal (strengths/weaknesses) and external (opportunities/threats) forces of the “C5 model” of consortium management. Findings From the SWOT analysis of the “C5 model,” it was observed that four combinations, maxi-maxi (strengths/opportunities (SO), mini-maxi (weaknesses/opportunities (WO), maxi-mini (strengths/threats (ST)) and mini-mini (weaknesses/threats (WT)), were drawn to derive a set of strategies to benefit the consortium management. The SO strategies such as building a client-centric resource management system, centralized gateway, collaborative acquisition model, common copyright communication and clearance center and cost-benefit analysis were built on the basis of the strengths and opportunities identified. Likewise, the WO strategies such as organizational planning, equality in ICT infrastructure facilities, quality content, public disclosure of copyright obligations and effective economic models were drawn to minimize the weaknesses of each component by taking advantage of the identified opportunities. The ST strategies were worked out using strengths of the model to possibly mitigate its threats. Similarly, the WT strategies were created to minimize the weaknesses and avoid the threats as much as possible. However, these strategies would not only help consortium management in the decision-making process, but also optimize returns and improve the intellectual outcome of organizations. Originality/value Not many research studies have been developed regarding the SWOT analysis of the “C5 model” for consortium management. This study attempts to benefit a large community of library and information science professionals, consortia and their clients.

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TL;DR: In this article, the authors put forward the position of chief learning officer (CLO) as a potential new role or models for new roles in libraries wishing to integrate human resources, strategic planning, and budgeting.
Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to put forward the position of chief learning officer (CLO) as a potential new role or models for new roles in libraries wishing to integrate human resources, strategic planning, and budgeting. Design/methodology/approach The paper reviews the history and present functions of the CLO role in the corporate world, correlating work within the library field with key aspects of the position as way by which to conceptualize the integration of disparate library operations. Findings The position of CLO has not yet entered the library and information science (LIS) discourse. Practical implications Libraries that do not have CLO-like positions in their organizations may benefit from adopting or adapting the position to their libraries. Originality/value The paper introduces the CLO position to the field of LIS.

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TL;DR: The collaborative relationship between librarian and student is cast in the mode of an outfitter: a guide preparing a client for a journey to overcome information overload and advocate a broader sense of satisficing through using more sophisticated critical thinking skills.
Abstract: Purpose In the future, librarians need to prepare users to navigate a profoundly different informational landscape. Addressing issues of information overload and informed selection of both search tools and results, the purpose of this paper is to cast the collaborative relationship between librarian and student in the mode of an outfitter: a guide preparing a client for a journey. Within this context, the authors emerging role involves guiding students through the task at hand using critical thinking skills to access a wider range of publications to meet a broader range of needs. Design/methodology/approach Metaphors created by Raymond and Friedman reflect the current state of information, the relationship users have with these sources, and the role librarians play in a disintermediated environment. In The Cathedral and the Bazaar, Raymond portrays a decentralized environment as a bazaar. In The World is Flat 3.0, Friedman describes how technology flattens organizations through empowering end users. The informational landscape in the twenty-first century is decentralized, and more powerful search tools provide unparalleled access to these sources. Users, however, continue to experience problems finding their information. A librarian/outfitter can prepare users to effectively track information in the new environment. Findings In the twenty-first century, a broader range of sources are available, and search engines are turning to dashboards to prioritize the growing list of results. Users need to adapt to the new environment through viewing the search as an activity rather than a destination. Librarians can help this process through sharing their expertise in uncovering likely places relevant information may be found, in evaluating sources, and locating information in a larger context. Through developing the meta-skill of information management, librarians guide users through the process of finding information for personal, professional, and academic needs. Practical implications The author’s goal is what it has always been: empowering end users to successfully access needed information in a disintermediated environment. Today librarians need to emphasize a fundamentally different set of skills in the interactions they have with students and faculty. People can use dashboards and satisficing to find sources they need, but librarian/outfitters can introduce a broader range of sources and tools suitable for completing specific tasks. This paper illustrates the different skills needed to effectively find information for personal, professional, and academic tasks. Originality/value This paper provides a new context for the process used for locating and validating information in an increasingly broad and diffuse informational landscape. Librarians become advisors in navigating a more complex informational landscape that is used to meet a broader range of informational needs. While focusing on navigating the broader range of resources through decoding dashboards and satisficing techniques, the author can assist users in overcoming information overload and advocate a broader sense of satisficing through using more sophisticated critical thinking skills.

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TL;DR: This study is one of the first to investigate tribal library activities by exploring report data and quantitatively using information visualization techniques, and provides insights and implications in five areas: general operations and management, staffing and human resource management, financial operations, service and program management, and technology-related activities.
Abstract: Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the operation and management as well as the activities of tribal libraries in general, providing insights and implications in five areas: general operations and management, staffing and human resource management, financial operations, service and program management, and technology-related activities, using Oglala Lakota College (OLC) Library as a case study. Design/methodology/approach This paper uses information visualization techniques to create visual displays of report data collected from OLC Library. Visualizations were created using Tableau software to provide a quantitative, analytical, and evidence-based view of how tribal libraries operate and are managed. Findings Tribal populations can be well served despite limited funding and staff resources, providing academic and public library services on par with urban libraries. Research limitations/implications Drawing a story from the data proved to be difficult because a bias had been created by the legal service area that most tables of the state data set used to compare reported data. How tribal libraries translate value also posed another challenge. Because the research was conducted in a single tribal library, further research in different, expanded settings and contexts is suggested. Originality/value This study is one of the first to investigate tribal library activities by exploring report data and quantitatively using information visualization techniques.