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Showing papers in "Literacy in 1997"


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Nov 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: This article explored the thinking and research that has led to a view of literacy as social and cultural practices, which adds to our understanding of literacy by switching the focus to the ways in which individuals, groups, communities and societies put literate practices to work.
Abstract: This article explores the thinking and research that has led to a view of literacy as social and cultural practices. Literacy is described not as an internal cognitive state or a universal set of skills and processes that individuals must learn, but as social and cultural ways of doing things through the use of text. This view adds to our understanding of literacy by switching the focus to the ways in which individuals, groups, communities and societies put literate practices to work. For teachers, this means thinking about the sorts of literacies they are trying to produce through their programmes. This implies studying classrooms and preschools as social and cultural settings where particular practices count as good work – asking which kinds of texts, ways of talking, reading, writing and behaving are preferred and why.

31 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigate whether the eye catching graphics of these books helps or hinders children's reading of them and their report raises many interesting issues, such as the usefulness of interactive books in teaching reading.
Abstract: CD-ROMs are becoming more widely used now and one particular genre seems to have a good deal to offer as a medium for the development of reading. These so-called ‘interactive books’ have not yet been investigated in terms of their usefulness in teaching reading and Clare Burrell and John Trushell make a useful beginning to this. They are particularly concerned with whether the eye catching graphics of these books helps or hinders children’s reading of them and their report raises many interesting issues.

27 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Nov 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: This paper examined the textual problems caused by science explanation texts and found that unless children are prepared to cope with these differences they will be handicapped in their use of literacy across the curriculum.
Abstract: A major problem which children come up against as they move through their schooling is learning to work with and produce texts with a range of distinctive structures and language features. Texts used in each curriculum area differ in their structures and features and unless children are prepared to cope with these differences they will be handicapped in their use of literacy across the curriculum. Len Unsworth explores this issue in some depth in this article by examining in detail the textual problems caused by science explanation texts.

26 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the importance of phonemic awareness in teaching reading and how children should be taught to develop this awareness in order to read effectively, but it is not yet clear exactly how to teach this awareness.
Abstract: Phonemic awareness is beginning to become rather a buzz term in discussions about methods of teaching reading and there is widespread agreement that children need to develop this awareness in order to read effectively. It is not yet clear exactly how they should be taught this awareness and Rhona Johnston and Joyce Watson here describe their research into this issue.

16 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: In this paper, the use of the relatively low-tech approach of audiotaped books was described in this context, and a more "high-tech" approach to Family Electronic Literacy through computers and the Internet is considered.
Abstract: In a previous article (part one), “parental involvement in children’s reading”, its development into the concept of “family literacy”, and the emerging notion of “electronic literacy” were discussed. The use of the relatively “low-tech” approach of audiotaped books was described in this context. In part two, a more “high-tech” approach to Family Electronic Literacy through computers and the Internet is considered. The intention is to offer a broad overview, a more detailed description of one specific practical example, and references which can be pursued by interested readers. Future developments are foreshadowed and action implications for practitioners and researchers are discussed. A list of resource locations is appended.

8 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Nov 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: Coles and Hall as discussed by the authors present the results of the most recent survey to shed light on the periodical reading which is actually happening among today's children and present some important findings which have the potential to alter significantly the ways teachers see this kind of reading and its possible contribution to the development of literacy.
Abstract: Periodicals, that is newspapers, magazines and comics, have always represented a substantial proportion of children’s reading outside school. They have not always been accepted or considered as reading within schools. Martin Coles and Chris Hall here present the results of the most recent survey to shed light on the periodical reading which is actually happening among today’s children. They present some important findings which have the potential to alter significantly the ways teachers see this kind of reading and its possible contribution to the development of literacy.

7 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: In this article, the idea of "parental involvement in children's reading" and its development into the concept of "family literacy" together with the emerging notion of "electronic literacy" is discussed.
Abstract: In part one of this discussion of Family Electronic Literacy, the aim is to briefly review the idea of “parental involvement in children’s reading” and its development into the concept of “family literacy”, together with the emerging notion of “electronic literacy”. From an integration of these, the beginnings of “Family Electronic Literacy” will be outlined. In this context the use of the relatively “low-tech” approach of audiotaped books will be described. The intention is to offer a broad overview, a more detailed description of one specific practical example, a typology of possible methods and references which can be pursued by interested readers. Part two will discuss a more “high-tech” approach to Family Electronic Literacy through computers and the Internet and include a list of resources.

6 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Nov 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: Pritchard as mentioned in this paper presented the results of a useful study which explored the use of ideas maps as a means of evaluating children's abilities to engage with and understand text and found that the maps were useful in helping children to understand a particular topic.
Abstract: Ideas maps, or concept maps as they are more usually known, have been accepted by a number of teachers as a useful way of helping establish or clarify children’s knowledge about a particular topic. Here Alan Pritchard presents the results of a useful study which explored the use of ideas maps as a means of evaluating children’s abilities to engage with and understand text.

5 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: In this article, Beresford showed how the views of nursery, reception and infant children in a Barking infants' school helped inform staff about the effectiveness of the school's reading policy.
Abstract: Actively canvassing the views of pupils on aspects of their learning is rapidly becoming accepted as an important part of a teacher’s planning and evaluation. In this article, John Beresford shows how the views of nursery, reception and infant children in a Barking infants’ school helped inform staff about the effectiveness of the school’s reading policy.

5 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: This paper examined the reading and writing choices of the children in a Year 6 class in both home and school contexts and found that the children chose very different genres in the home as compared with the school setting.
Abstract: There has been much recent interest in the reading and writing choices children make and how far these choices are affected by their gender. Differences in the reading preferences of boys and girls seem to become more marked as children move through the primary years. Given that literacy involves control over a range of texts, as reader and writer, teachers seek ways of increasing the repertoire of both boys and girls. The first part of this study examines the reading and writing choices of the children in a Year 6 class in both home and school contexts. The questionnaire responses indicated that the children chose very different genres in the home as compared with the school setting and that gender differences were more marked in the home preferences. The analysis then draws on some of the children’s comments and views in exploring the implications of their preferences and the attitudes behind them. Finally, some strategies for encouraging wider and more reflective reading of both boys and girls are suggested.

5 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: Currie explores some of the reasons why teachers might choose to use a novel as a vehicle for the teaching and learning of literacy as mentioned in this paper and suggests that it has more to offer than a diet of extracts from stories, as often provided through junior reading scheme books.
Abstract: Laura-Ann Currie explores some of the reasons why teachers might choose to use a novel as a vehicle for the teaching and learning of literacy. She outlines some of the benefits of this kind of work and suggests that it has more to offer than a diet of extracts from stories, as often provided through junior reading scheme books.

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Nov 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: The use of high frequency word lists has re-emerged recently as a useful part of the knowledge base of primary teachers of literacy and the National Literacy Project framework for teaching makes explicit use of such lists as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The use of high frequency word lists has re-emerged recently as a useful part of the knowledge base of primary teachers of literacy. The National Literacy Project framework for teaching makes explicit use of such lists. In this article Laura Huxford and her colleagues examine the contents of word lists and make some useful observations about the words it appears important to teach children to read at Key Stage 1.

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: There is a good deal of evidence that children's feelings about and attitudes towards an activity they do in school can have a considerable bearing upon their success in that activity as discussed by the authors and this is true with regard to reading and reports on a study which explored the information teachers could glean from monitoring childrens feelings about reading.
Abstract: There is a good deal of evidence that children’s feelings about and attitudes towards an activity they do in school can have a considerable bearing upon their success in that activity. Hazel Francis suggests this is true with regard to reading and reports on a study which explored the information teachers could glean from monitoring children’s feelings about reading.

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: Sperling as mentioned in this paper gave a timely reminder of the contribution a public library service can make to the development of children's literacy, with the role of library services in schools under some threat due to funding problems.
Abstract: With the role of library services in schools under some threat due to funding problems, Sharon Sperling gives a timely reminder of the contribution a public library service can make to the development of children’s literacy.

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: Christina Hvitfeldt as mentioned in this paper suggests several ways of doing this and her article makes a very practical contribution to the area of reading and reasoning in children's reading experiences.
Abstract: It sounds almost self-evident that reading and reasoning are linked. Yet building thinking activities firmly into children’s reading experiences is not always a priority for teachers. Here Christina Hvitfeldt suggests several ways of doing this and her article makes a very practical contribution to the area.

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe the way this was approached in one particular system and present evidence concerning the effectiveness of the input provided in this case, and the results of their experiments are presented.
Abstract: How can reading achievement be improved across a school system or education authority? Chris Berry here describes the way this was approached in one particular system and presents evidence concerning the effectiveness of the input provided in this case.

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Nov 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: Lingard as mentioned in this paper makes an excellent case for an approach which stresses analogy and embeds phonics work within a balanced literacy program, which embeds the phoneme-grapheme correspondences of English into the curriculum.
Abstract: Few people would challenge the need for children to be systematically taught the phoneme-grapheme correspondences of English as part of their acquisition of literacy – that is, to be taught some phonics. The issue is not whether, but how phonics should be taught. Tony Lingard here makes an excellent case for an approach which stresses analogy and embeds phonics work within a balanced literacy programme.

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Nov 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: In this article, a cross-curricular aspect of the Key Stage 3 reading curriculum has been discussed and the potential impact across the range of subject areas is also considered, with an overview of the issues that arose and how the English Department has developed an overview to tackle them.
Abstract: of work on reading for learning skills The unit was team taught by a head of English and an LEA English consultant Details of the unit of work as it developed, examples of the students’ work, the issues that arose and how the English Department has developed an overview to tackle this cross-curricular aspect of the Key Stage 3 reading curriculum are included The potential impact across the range of subject areas is also considered

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: In this article, the suitability of cloze for testing reading is in doubt; it is likely to underestimate some readers' abilities and it should not be used to test reading in isolation from other measures.
Abstract: When informal measures of reading assessment were used with a Further Education student the results were different to those obtained with the Basic Skills Agency’s reading test based on cloze exercises. After describing the informal assessment the reasons for the discrepancy between the two methods are discussed. These are based first on the language production demands of cloze, and second on the relationship between functional literacy materials and cloze success. The author concludes that the suitability of cloze for testing reading is in doubt; it is likely to underestimate some readers’ abilities and it should not be used to test reading in isolation from other measures. Please note ALBSU has changed its name to the Basic Skills Agency, and to avoid confusion BSA will be used throughout the article even if at the time referred to it was known as ALBSU.

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: Stainthorp as discussed by the authors argued that the reading SATs are very crude measures of children's reading abilities and that from their results, we actually have no idea how well some children are doing at reading.
Abstract: SATs, particularly in Key Stage 1 have always been perhaps the most controversial aspect of the recent curriculum reforms. In this article, Rhona Stainthorp reports her research into the validity and usefulness of the KS1 SATs. Her results make rather worrying reading, suggesting that the reading SATs are very crude measures of children’s reading abilities. As Stainthorp argues, from their results, we actually have no idea how well some children are doing at reading.

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: Carole Silva as discussed by the authors discusses the potential of reading aloud to children in a classroom and gives several practical suggestions for working with children to encourage the development of literacy in children in the classroom.
Abstract: There are lots of opportunities in a classroom day for the development of literacy. Reading aloud to children is one of the most important of these. Carole Silva here reminds us of the potential of this activity and gives several practical suggestions for working with children.

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jul 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors investigate the dangers of under-estimating children's abilities in this regard and suggest that there are many dangers in underestimating children' abilities in the writing process and that teachers are required to teach children to redraft writing at Key Stage 2 in the National Curriculum.
Abstract: Redrafting is clearly a crucial part of the writing process and teachers are currently required to teach children to redraft writing at Key Stage 2 in the National Curriculum. For Kathy Durkin this is much too late and she reports here on her investigations into introducing redrafting to Key Stage 1 children. From her work it seems there are many dangers in under-estimating children’s abilities in this regard.

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: This paper explored the progression of one child's literacy from 4 months to 38 months and found that one of the most significant aspects of this emergence is interaction with others in authentic literacy activities, a feature which has a number of implications for teachers and researchers alike.
Abstract: This article explores the progression of one child’s literacy from 4 months to 38 months. The emergence of literate behaviour is interpreted in the light of current theories such as those of Halliday and Dyson. One of the most significant aspects of this emergence is shown to be interaction with others in authentic literacy activities, a feature which has a number of implications for teachers and researchers alike.

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Nov 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: Fenwick et al. as discussed by the authors conducted a small scale look at children's poetry preferences and raised several points which will be of interest to primary teachers interested in using poetry with their classes.
Abstract: It is probably true to say that poetry for children is still a fairly neglected area of study. There have been very few studies which have attempted to ascertain what primary pupils prefer in poetry. Such information is vital if teachers are to build upon their pupils’ tastes and experiences. Geoff Fenwick and Denis Burns here discuss the results of a small scale look at children’s poetry preferences. They raise several points which will be of interest to primary teachers interested in using poetry with their classes.

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: In this article, Evans put forward a convincing case for the retention and use of regular story time sessions in the primary curriculum, especially in junior classes, as the curriculum becomes squeezed by all the demands which are made upon it.
Abstract: Storytime is an aspect of the primary curriculum which is rather under threat, especially in junior classes, as the curriculum becomes squeezed by all the demands which are made upon it. Janet Evans puts forward a convincing case for the retention and use of regular story time sessions.

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Nov 1997-Literacy
TL;DR: One secondary school decided to mount a survey of the reading habits of their pupils in Years 7, 8 and 9 as discussed by the authors, and the results of the survey and outlines the use the school made of the findings.
Abstract: As part of a school improvement project involving Enfield LEA and the Cambridge Institute of Education, one secondary school decided to mount a survey of the reading habits of their pupils in Years 7, 8 and 9. John Beresford presents the results of the survey and outlines the use the school made of the findings. In so doing he suggests an approach which could be adopted by any school concerned about its standards of literacy.