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Showing papers in "Middle Eastern Literatures in 2014"




Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an auto-critical and autobiographical narrative of Ottoman-Armenian writer Hagop Oshagan (1883-1948) is used to explain how Ottoman subjects reacted to or absorbed the crises of differentiation that sundered their inter-communal coexistence.
Abstract: Recent years have witnessed burgeoning interest in the inter-communal and inter-confessional dimensions of Ottoman subjecthood, leading to historical studies on the phenomenology of inter-communality and its demise. However, the paucity or inadequacy of such works’ archival sources have restricted efforts to explain how Ottoman subjects reacted to or absorbed the crises of differentiation that sundered their inter-communal coexistence. The discussion herein intervenes to redress this dearth by working through the auto-critical and autobiographical narrative of Ottoman-Armenian writer Hagop Oshagan (1883–1948). To that end, it renders a hitherto unattended phenomenology of the apostatic subject; a doubled figure astride laterally practiced socio-cultural synthesis and vertically experienced politico-religious differentiation. Tracing a term of Oshagan's usage, ‘hogekhaṛnut‘iwn’ (meaning, ‘soul-mixture' or ‘psychic disposition’), first posits conversion's centrality in the synthesized self-constitut...

8 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a close reading of Nuql-i majlis, the first biographical anthology (tadhkira) produced in Qajar Iran of poetry by women, is presented.
Abstract: Through a close reading of Nuql-i majlis, the first biographical anthology (tadhkira) produced in Qajar Iran of poetry by women, this study investigates the following questions about women poets and their works in the broader context of the literary developments in the period 1800–1840. What contribution did women make in the early nineteenth century to the production of poetry in Iran? To what extent can these women poets be considered active players in the Literary Return (Bāzgasht-i adabī)? What training did women receive in the poetic arts? To what extent and in what contexts did women act as patrons of poetry in this period? How was their poetry disseminated? And, perhaps most significantly, to what extent can this nineteenth-century women's poetry be viewed as part of a longer history of women's writing in Iran?

6 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article showed that a Hegelian spirit pervades The Cairo Trilogy by examining two landmarks: time as a continuous dialectical flow from the contradictions and internal conflicts of one cycle towards a new one, and the relationships between men and women.
Abstract: This article shows that a Hegelian spirit pervades The Cairo Trilogy by examining two landmarks: time as a continuous dialectical flow from the contradictions and internal conflicts of one cycle towards a new one, and the relationships between men and women. Maḥfūẓ seems to echo Hegel's idea that the effect of time and history on society is different from, and even sometimes contrary to, the sum of their effects on individuals. But Maḥfūẓ does not follow Hegel in depriving women of a role equal to men's in changing the social norms. Thus he seems to understand the master–slave dialectic in a Marxian way more consistent than Hegel's own use of it. Hegel and conservative Islam view women as distinguished from and inferior to men by nature, while Maḥfūẓ represents a modern open-minded non-discriminating attitude. The Cairo Trilogy begins with the dominance of the Patriarch (al-Sayyid) but ends heralding the dawn of women's emancipation.

5 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The second part of a double study on the Arabic novel conceived by Ouyang and published between 2012 and 2013 as mentioned in this paper, concerns an in-dept reading of the aes.
Abstract: Politics of Nostalgia is the second part of a double study on the Arabic novel conceived by Ouyang and published between 2012 and 2013 This extensive project concerns an in-dept reading of the aes

4 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors trace the development of the modern Moroccan Arabic police procedural and its fraught representations of globalization and discuss the way the genre ties the phenomenon to the sudden emergence of international organized crime, professional killers, gun violence, double lives and corrupting foreigners on the Moroccan terrain.
Abstract: In this article, I trace the development of the modern Moroccan Arabic police procedural and its fraught representations of globalization. After defining the police procedural and surveying its development in diverse national literatures, I discuss how and why the genre was almost entirely absent from modern Arabic literature until 1997 in Morocco. I tie the emergence of the genre in Morocco to transformations in politics and the mass media at the time, as the country began the process of opening up after decades of closed authoritarianism. I then examine the depiction of globalization in three Moroccan Arabic police novels, discussing the way the genre ties the phenomenon to the sudden emergence of international organized crime, professional killers, gun violence, double lives, and corrupting foreigners on the Moroccan terrain. Through my analysis of these novels, I show how the genre inscribes a deep sense of anxiety and foreboding by depicting the country in the new era as an innocent victim of...

4 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on the way modern Arab authors have revived the memory of Zenobia and the way they have adopted the Greco-Latin version of history and why.
Abstract: Historical sources present us with two Zenobia of Palmyra characters. In the Greco-Latin sources she is the leader of a great rebellion against the Roman Empire. That is the most commonly known version. There is, however, a second historiography of Zenobia. This Arab version presents us with a very different tale, in which Zenobia (al-Zabbāʾ) struggles in the context of Arab tribal warfare. This article is concerned with the way modern Arab authors have revived the memory of Zenobia. A key question will be which version of history was adopted by modern Arab authors, and why. This will involve a close reading of texts that will bring into play discussion of ideology, (anti-)colonialism and gender equality.

4 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a detailed analysis of the corresponding tales between this work and the Nights reveals the fact that the compilers of the Nights copied a limited number of tales directly from Isḥāqī's chronicle, thus supplying a glimpse into the "studio" of the compiler of the nights.
Abstract: Most of the ‘complete’ manuscripts of the Thousand and One Nights in Arabic preserved today were compiled in the 18th and 19th centuries. Since the original manuscripts the compilers of the new manuscripts had at hand were fragmentary, they exploited a wide range of sources to come up with complete manuscripts. The sources the compilers used for their compilations were most probably works from the Mamluk and Ottoman periods that were more readily available than copies of the works dating from the classical period of Arabic literature. The particular work studied in the present essay is the chronicle Kitāb laṭāʾif akhbār al-uwal (‘Subtle Stories from the Forefathers’), compiled by Muḥammad b. ʿAbd al-Muʿṭī al-Isḥāqī (died 1623). A detailed analysis of the corresponding tales between this work and the Nights reveals the fact that the compilers of the Nights copied a limited numbers of tales directly from Isḥāqī's chronicle, thus supplying a glimpse into the ‘studio’ of the compilers of the Nights.

4 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article investigated the intricate connections between sexuality, desire and clothing in Halid Ziya Usakligil's turn-of-the-century novel Ask-i Memnu (Forbidden Love, serialized in 1900), which is perceived to be one of the founding blocks of prose fiction in Turkish.
Abstract: This paper investigates the intricate connections between sexuality, desire and clothing in Halid Ziya Usakligil's turn-of-the-century novel Ask-i Memnu (Forbidden Love, serialized in 1900), which is perceived to be one of the founding blocks of prose fiction in Turkish. More specifically, the paper focuses on the role of clothes and the shopping for clothes in shaping the relationships between the two female protagonists, with the help of the theoretical framework provided by Rene Girard in Deceit, Desire and the Novel: Self and Other in Literary Structure. Through a reconsideration of the major dynamics of plot and character development, enabled by a new type of relationality between clothes and their wearers or commodities and their users, the paper seeks to position the century-old novel within its historically specific cultural and economic context, and hence responds to existent criticism that tends to see it as divorced from the social reality of its time.

3 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The vorliegende Publikation ist Teil der Serie Literatures and Cultures of the Islamic World as discussed by the authors, einem breiteren Publika.
Abstract: Die vorliegende Publikation ist Teil der Serie Literatures and Cultures of the Islamic World. In seiner Vorbemerkung betont der Herausgeber Hamid Dabashi das Anliegen der Serie, einem breiteren Pub...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Other Side of the Mountain (2000) as mentioned in this paper explores the way Atasu's novel employs a variety of thematic and formal devices to represent the modern emancipated Turkish woman's relationship with her body.
Abstract: The mind–body dualism and woman's perception of her body in patriarchal culture have been major concerns for feminist thinking in the West. This essay attempts to place this issue within a non-western context through an analysis of the Turkish author Erendiz Atasu's novel, The Other Side of the Mountain (2000). The essay explores the way Atasu's novel employs a variety of thematic and formal devices to represent the modern emancipated Turkish woman's relationship with her body. It also discusses how these concerns manifest themselves in the ‘embodied’ style of writing adopted throughout. By drawing parallels between the treatment of this issue in the novel and the development of feminist theorizing about the body in the West, the essay demonstrates that Atasu's novel operates not only on a culturally specific level but also on a more universal level, making a significant literary contribution to the wider feminist project of undermining the dichotomies rooted in patriarchy.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Sadeq Hedayat is Iran's most influential modern writer of prose fiction, and his short novel Buf-e Kur, first published in 1936 in Bombay, is a key work of Persian literary modernity as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Sadeq Hedayat is Iran's most influential modern writer of prose fiction, and his short novel Buf-e Kur, first published in 1936 in Bombay, is a key work of Persian literary modernity. Despite the n...

Journal ArticleDOI
L. Osti1
TL;DR: In this paper, the House of Wisdom and the translation of the Greek classics were discussed. But they were not discussed in the context of the first century of the First World War.
Abstract: Twelve centuries after the Abbasid caliph al-Maʾmūn established the House of Wisdom and funded the translation of the Greek classics, two centuries after Muhammad Ali sent out his envoys on a missi...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the ways the massacre is represented in two recent Turkish novels, Ates ve Kugu (Fire and the Swan) by Burhan Gunel and Seytan Minareleri (Seashells) by Hidayet Karakus, with a view to examining the approaches these works offer to meet the challenge.
Abstract: On 2 July 1993 the fire set on Hotel Madimak in Sivas, Turkey by religious fanatics claimed the lives of 37 people. Such traumatic events need to be narrated to heal the wound they have opened in the public consciousness. Yet it is also true that they pose a serious challenge to the narrator as they lie beyond the reach of usual means of representation. This article examines the ways the massacre is represented in the two recent Turkish novels, Ates ve Kugu (Fire and the Swan) by Burhan Gunel and Seytan Minareleri (Seashells) by Hidayet Karakus, with a view to examining the approaches these works offer to meet the challenge.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A brief short story in Arabic, "Astīr: Ḏkirat al-raqs" (Memory of the dance), is characterized by its hybridity and by an innovative textual history.
Abstract: A brief short story in Arabic, «Astīr: Ḏkirat al-raqs» (Memory of the dance), is characterized by its hybridity and by an innovative textual history. It is the result of a collaborative, evolving writing process (ecriture), both African and Arab, at one time Sudanese and Palestinian, male and female, narrative and lyrical. Published online in 2002, by the Sudanese novelist Khālid ʿUways under the title Astīr qissa qasīra lam taktamil (Aster: an unfinished short story), it was completed a year later by the Palestinian poet Dunyā l-Amal Ismāʿīl, who, while retaining a thematic and stylistic coherence, establishes her own imprint, adding (for instance) Dhākirat al-raqs as a subtitle.




Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Siyâhatnâme-ye Ebrâhim Beg by Zeynol-Bedin Marâghe'i is undoubtedly among the most significant and influential works of Persian literature in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The Siyâhatnâme-ye Ebrâhim Beg by Zeynol-‘Âbedin Marâghe'i is undoubtedly among the most significant and influential works of Persian literature in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Muhammad Hasan Askari as mentioned in this paper was Urdu's first literary critic in the western, practical sense of the term: that is, he chose to set up as a critic, an interpreter and a judge of literature.
Abstract: Muhammad Hasan Askari was Urdu's first literary critic in the western, practical sense of the term: that is, he chose to set up as a critic, an interpreter and a judge of literature. Askari made hi...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors traces the role of the zuppe through important changes in the conventions of the Turkish novel and in its subsequent reinvention in Adalet Agaoglu's Uc Bes Kisi (A Few People).
Abstract: This article traces the role of the zuppe (dandy) through important changes in the conventions of the Turkish novel and in its subsequent reinvention in Adalet Agaoglu's Uc Bes Kisi (A Few People). It asks why the character of the dandy—so enmeshed in the socio-political context of the late Ottoman period—has successfully survived the aesthetic challenges and new social horizons placed before it in the 20th and 21st centuries. By way of an answer, this article will argue that the dandy's legacy has become intertwined with dominant modes of narration as well with approaches to literary criticism, thus being uniquely situated within literature as well as having the possibility to speak about it.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Although acknowledged as one of the major Persian poets, Amīr Khusrau Dihlawī (651/1253/725/1325) has been the object of relatively little scholarly attention as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Although acknowledged as one of the major Persian poets, Amīr Khusrau Dihlawī (651/1253–725/1325) has been the object of relatively little scholarly attention; if only for this reason, this book is...