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Showing papers in "Mln in 1989"


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Sep 1989-Mln
TL;DR: Kritzman as discussed by the authors discusses Foucault and the politics of experience and the art of telling the truth about the truth and the danger of power and sex in the Middle East.
Abstract: Foreward Introduction: Foucault and the politics of Experience Lawrence D. Kritzman 1. The Minimalist Self 2. Critical Theory/Intellectual History 3. An aesthetics of Existence 4. Politics and Reason 5. The Art of Telling the Truth 6. On Power 7. Power and Sex 8. The Dangerous Individual 9. Practicing Criticism 10. Social Security 11. Confinement, Psychiatry, Prison 12. Iran: The Spirit of a World Without Spirit 13. The Battle for Chastity 14. The Return of Morality 15. The Concern for Truth 16. Sexual Morality and the Law 17. Sexual Choice, Sexual Act: Foucault and Homosexuality 18. The Functions of Literature 19. Contemporary Music and Its Public 20. The Masked Philosopher

739 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1989-Mln
TL;DR: Lacoue-Labarthe as discussed by the authors presents a theory of literature in German Romanticism at the intersection of the 19th and the 18th centuries, which he calls The Literary Absolute.
Abstract: title : The Literary Absolute : The Theory of Literature in German Romanticism Intersections (Albany, N.Y.) author : Lacoue-Labarthe, Philippe.; Nancy, Jean-Luc. publisher : State University of New York Press isbn10 | asin : 0887066615 print isbn13 : 9780887066610 ebook isbn13 : 9780585091761 language : English subject Romanticism--Germany, German literature--18th century-History and criticism, German literature--19th century--History and criticism, German literature--History and criticism-Theory, etc, Criticism--Germany--History, Philosophy, German--18th century, Phi publication date : 1988 lcc : PT363.P6L3 1988eb ddc : 830/.9/145 subject : Romanticism--Germany, German literature--18th century-History and criticism, German literature--19th century--History and criticism, German literature--History and criticism-Theory, etc, Criticism--Germany--History, Philosophy, German--18th century, Phi

327 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1989-Mln
TL;DR: Italo Calvino as mentioned in this paper was due to deliver the Charles Eliot Norton lectures at Harvard in 1985-86, but they were left unfinished at his death, and the surviving drafts explore the concepts of lightness, quickness, multiplicity, exactitude and visibility (Constancy was to be the sixth) in serious yet playful essays.
Abstract: Italo Calvino was due to deliver the Charles Eliot Norton lectures at Harvard in 1985-86, but they were left unfinished at his death. The surviving drafts explore of the concepts of lightness, quickness, multiplicity, exactitude and visibility (Constancy was to be the sixth) in serious yet playful essays that reveal Calvino's debt to the comic strip and the folktale. With his customary imagination and grace, he sought to define the virtues of the great literature of the past in order to shape the values of the future. This collection is a brilliant precis of the work of a great writer whose legacy will endure through the millennium he addressed.

294 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 1989-Mln
TL;DR: In addition to the thirty-five essays, "Responses" contains a detailed chronology of Paul de Man's life up to the time of his first American academic appointment as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: ""The Responses" volume exhibits both the wealth of historical research provoked by de Man's wartime journalism ...and the intensive scrutiny devoted to line after line of the texts themselves." - "Literature and History". In addition to the thirty-five essays, "Responses" contains a detailed chronology of Paul de Man's life up to the time of his first American academic appointment.

52 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 1989-Mln
TL;DR: The difference of literature character and the connection with reality style allusion structure perspective perspective multiple readings and the bog of indeterminacy is discussed in this paper, with a focus on the relation between the two.
Abstract: The difference of literature character and the connection with reality style allusion structure perspective multiple readings and the bog of indeterminacy. (Part contents)

51 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1989-Mln
TL;DR: In this article, the authors consider the notion of the whole continuum as a single object for an act of sensation or thinking, and as such do not need to be sensed or thought of simultaneously.
Abstract: Now if things are regarded as part of a continuum, they can be taken either as many or as one; for taken separately, one by one, they are many; and as such they do not form a single object for an act of sensation or thinking, nor are they sensed or thought of simultaneously. But they can be regarded in another way, namely as composing the whole continuum; and as such they are apprehended all at once and by one act, whether of sensation or intelligence.

49 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1989-Mln
TL;DR: In this article, Primo Levi revient sur son experience concentrationnaire, a.k.a., the experience concentration of experience concentration, and the experience of experience this article.
Abstract: Recit dans lequel Primo Levi revient sur son experience concentrationnaire. - Dernier ecrit de Primo Levi

42 citations




Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 1989-Mln
TL;DR: The authors discuss the concept of the sacred and the secular in western literature, and agrues that poetry cannot be judged by socially constructed criteria, and discuss the need for a distinction between the two.
Abstract: Discusses the concept of the sacred and the secular in western literature, and agrues that poetry cannot be judged by socially constructed criteria.



Book ChapterDOI
01 Mar 1989-Mln
TL;DR: The lady Dofia Beatriz de Justiz Marchioness Justiz de Santa Ana, wife of Don Juan Manzano, took pleasure every time she went to her famous estate of El Molino in choosing the prettiest Creole girls, when they were ten or eleven years of age; she took them with her and gave them an education suitable to their class and condition so her house was always filled with servants as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: "The lady Dofia Beatriz de Justiz Marchioness Justiz de Santa Ana, wife of Don Juan Manzano, took pleasure every time she went to her famous estate of El Molino in choosing the prettiest Creole girls, when they were ten or eleven years of age; she took them with her and gave them an education suitable to their class and condition so her house was always filled with servants. ..." ["La Sra. Da. Beatriz de Justiz MarquezaJustiz de Sta. Ana, esposa del Sor. Don Juan Manzano, tenia gusto de cada vez qe. iva a su famosa asienda el Molino de tomar las mas bonitas criollas, cuando eran de dies a onse afios; las traia consigo y dandoles una educaci6n conforme a su clase y condision, estaba siempre su casa llena de criadas.. ..'T


Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 1989-Mln
TL;DR: The post-structuralist theory in North America is beginning to catch up with its past as mentioned in this paper, which can be described, at the risk of drastic simplification, as the problematizing of representation: in art and literature, in criticism and aesthetics, in theories of language, knowledge and history, in political and social thought.
Abstract: Is post-structuralist theory in North America beginning to catch up with its past? The "past" I am alluding to can be described, at the risk of drastic simplification, as the problematizing of "representation": in art and literature, in criticism and aesthetics, in theories of language, knowledge and history, in political and social thought. The problematic of representation has for some twenty years imposed itself through the writings of Derrida and Foucault, Lacan and Barthes, Deleuze and Lyotard. Their writings in turn promoted the rereading of a certain number of predecessors: Saussure, Freud, Nietzsche, Mallarme, but also Plato, Kant, Hegel, Marx, et al. Such a list can of course be only indicative. But the most glaring and symptomatic omission is clearly that of Heidegger. Not that there have been no important texts written in North America seeking to reread Heidegger in relation to poststructuralist problematics: this is obviously not the case.' The omission is nonetheless glaring, because the concern with Heidegger has, at least until recently, been in no recognizable proportion to the seminal importance explicitly attributed to Heidegger by Derrida, from his earliest writings on2, or, for that matter, by Lacan, less massively, perhaps, but no less emphatically. The work of Paul de Man can also be read as an unremitting 'Auseinandersetzung' with Heidegger. And since there can be no doubt as to the role played by Heidegger in problematizing representational thought, the lack of attention so far devoted to his work is symptomatic of a resistance, one which is not very difficult to explain,

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 1989-Mln
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors examine the cultural and social implications of "plague" in German culture under National Socialism and in Germany (both East and West) today, and examine the fantasies of contagion and disease within German culture of 1939 and 1989.
Abstract: The question of the national qualities ascribed to an illness has not been widely addressed in the debates about the social construction of the idea of AIDS.' Indeed, there has been an assumption-in work as controversial as that of Roy Porter or Susan Sontag, or indeed in my own work-that there is a "Western" (read: Christian or read: medical) tradition which has determined the basic structure of the ideas of disease.2 My intent with this study is to illustrate some of the discontinuities in such over-reaching models or perhaps more modestly to show the national variations on such themes. I will be looking at the cultural and social implications of "plague" in German culture under National Socialism and in Germany (both East and West) today. My point of departure will be the cultural representation of disease.3 I shall use two novels as my artifacts in order to examine the fantasies of contagion and disease within German culture of 1939 and 1989. The first is the best-selling4 novel by Rudolf Heinrich Daumann, Patrouille gegen den Tod (Patrol against Death) of 19395 and the second, Peter Zingler's 19896 novel Die Seuche (The Plague), published half a century later.7 These two novels reflect a basic set of attitudes present in German culture concerning the relationship between ideas of space and ideas of race, between representations of the body and concepts of difference. These concepts are, of course, "Western," they make use of the basic para-

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 1989-Mln
TL;DR: For instance, this paper pointed out that the possibility that psychoanalytic thought itself might have a contribution to make to theories of translation has largely been overlooked, and it is mainly this that interests me here.
Abstract: One of the consequences of my effort to translate Jacques Lacan's Ethique de la Psychanalyse into English has been that, predictably enough, I, too, have come to reflect on the problems and possibilities of translation. What is perhaps less predictable is the special kind of stimulus that a work of psychoanalytic theory has provided. Questions of translation have been associated with the dissemination of psychoanalysis almost from the beginning, and they have frequently generated fierce polemics. Yet the possibility that psychoanalytic thought itself might have a contribution to make to theories of translation has largely been overlooked. And it is chiefly this that interests me here. Among our modern loci classici on the topic of translation in general, Walter Benjamin's "Task of the Translator"2 remains, of course, preeminent. And not long before his death, Paul de Man subjected that essay to a provocative reading in a paper entitled "Walter Benjamin's 'The Task of the Translator'."3 Perhaps the most surprising point about de Man's commentary is that, although he is consistently laudatory in discussing the predecessor text and summarizes some of its arguments approvingly, he, in fact, comes to conclusions that are in many ways radically at variance with Benjamin's. Unlike Benjamin, de Man affirms "the impossibility of translation" and he does so on the basis of a concept he cl ims to have discovered in the latter's essay, namely, "the in-

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Apr 1989-Mln
TL;DR: Herder's work leaves little doubt about his anthropological interests, and he proceeds to stress them with his very first sentence as mentioned in this paper, highlighted typographically by spaced letters that already provide the image of continuity and distancing.
Abstract: Let us, first, pursue the question of the origin: "Haben die Menschen, ihren Naturfahigkeiten tiberlaBen, sich selbst Sprache erfinden konnen?"' Johann Gottfried Herder answers this question, proposed by the Prussian Academy in 1769,2 with his Abhandlung uiber den Ursprung der Sprache, an essay that would win for its author a desired prize and recognition, and would be published by the Academy in 1772. Herder's work leaves little doubt about his anthropological interests, and he proceeds, indeed, to stress them with his very first sentence. This sentence is highlighted typographically by spaced letters that already provide the image of continuity and distancing



Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 1989-Mln
TL;DR: Bakhtin this paper argued that the grotesque character of popular parodical literature is perhaps carnival's greatest triumph, for the very ambivalence of praise and degradation echoes the eternally unfinished metamorphosis, of death and birth, growth and becoming.
Abstract: The word "carnival," as used by Mikhail Bakhtin, refers to the culture of the marketplace and the forms of folk humor which arose in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. The manifestations of this popular culture included comic festivities and ritual activities, memorialized in the oral and written parodies from which an entire body of recreational literature was born. Among the most salient traits of carnivalesque compositions are licentiousness, irreverence, and an exaggerated fascination with the human body and with its appetites and instincts, both noble and base. The ambivalence inherent in the portrayal of bodily impulses is central to the grotesque realism that Bakhtin attributes to Rabelais in particular and to carnival expression in general. For Bakhtin, the grotesque character of popular parodical literature is perhaps carnival's greatest triumph, for the very ambivalence of praise and degradation echoes the eternally "unfinished metamorphosis, of death and birth, growth and becoming" (Bakhtin, 24). The grotesque, in short, signals the cosmic triumph of regeneration over death.' The world of carnival, according to Bakhtin, traditionally stands outside of an "official" culture marked by sobriety and asceticism, intolerance and repression.2 These elements conspire to produce

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1989-Mln
TL;DR: One fairly recent event in literary studies has been the admission of children into adult rooms and, with no warning or instructions to them, into adult games as discussed by the authors, which has been called the "soft and persistent beating at the door".
Abstract: One fairly recent event in literary studies has been the admission of children into adult rooms and, with no warning or instructions to them, into adult games. Critics finally seem to have acknowledged that soft and persistent beating at the door; yet the children had been knocking for a while, before one could hear them.' Poets had a better ear; they knew that the children were there, and had already let them in. If one wanted to locate in Western Literature the time of the momentous appearance of children as autonomous characters, endowed with a presence and a mistery of their own, one would spot the advent toward the very end of the XVIII century; and, at that point, the investigator would be struck by an unexpected discovery. He would realize, not without awe, that the children had to be heard because they were dying. The child

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1989-Mln
TL;DR: In this article, the authors point out that the main cause which inclines us to accept the eternity of Virgil's damnation before we think to question it is the hopelessness of the author himself, the Virgil whom we learn to look up to as the authority on Hell.
Abstract: Kenelm Foster and, more recently, Robert Hollander have reopened the question of the justice of Virgil's damnation.' I find support in the strong cases they make that Dante's disposition of the virtuous pagans is, on the face of it, a puzzle, but I shall not be concerned here with the interesting, and rather similar, hypotheses which they suggest as solutions. Rather, I point to an assumption behind their arguments, one which seems to be characteristic of current Dante scholarship and to be virtually unquestioned and thus unexamined: the assumption that Dante's Virgil is, in fact, condemned to "eternal exile," as he himself puts it.2 Behind this there may be an even more inclusive assumption: that, though Dante's poem can record certain great victories won, in the past, over God's judgment on the inhabitants of Hell, it cannot foreshadow any such victories to be won after its composition. I believe that a careful reading of Par. XIX-XX puts on the defensivein need of substantiating evidence-this assumption of ours that Cato, Trajan, and Ripheus are the exceptions to a now final judgment on the virtuous pagans rather than precedents encouraging us to appeal that judgment. Furthermore, I question that such substantiating evidence exists. However, I am not so bold as to argue that the belief, of so many readers, that Virgil's state is hopeless rests on nothing better than negligence. This belief rests upon what appears to be, until it is deliberately tested, convincing evidence. I suspect that the main cause which inclines us to accept the eternity of Virgil's damnation before we think to question it is the hopelessness of Virgil himself, the Virgil whom we learn to look up to as the authority on Hell. But Virgil's hopelessness cannot be evidence for its own validity. Hopelessness is the essence of the state of damnation (Abandon every

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 1989-Mln
TL;DR: The verdadera historia de los famosos hechos de don Quijote ciertamente cuida de que no falten a este ocasiones for desempefiar fielmente el papel de caballero conforme con la tradicion literaria as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: El sabio que escribe la verdadera historia de los famosos hechos de don Quijote ciertamente cuida de que no falten a este ocasiones para desempefiar fielmente el papel de caballero conforme con la tradicion literaria. Estando a punto de pasar por alto el episodio del amante alterado por el desden de la amada, don Quijote es advertido por la estratagema de su apuntador trascendente. Unas notas aparecen ante el cuando ha perdido la direccion de su representacion, descaminandose para entrar en Sierra Morena; poco despues pasa ante sus ojos la imagen de Cardenio brincando de pefia en pefia. El caballero ya habia tomado contacto con el extremismo amoroso en el episodio de Grisostomo y Marcela, pero el valor mnemonico de este lance era relativo, pues no es propio de los heroes epicos sino de los protagonistas de la novela sentimental (Leriano en Carcel de amor) morir de amor por una mujer altanera, y el hidalgo no podia entregarse al juego mimetico sin cambiar el genero que conforma sus actos. Cuando en la Segunda Parte se convenza de la imposibilidad de desencantar a Dulcinea y acepte la inaccesibilidad del amor como un hecho, el dolor que lo empuja hacia la muerte le hara sentir la propiedad de aceptar un codigo narrativo distinto: el de la novela pastoril. En Sierra Morena, por el contrario, las circunstancias se ajustaran mejor a sus opciones mimeticas: "Asi como don Quijote entro por aquellas montafnas, se le alegro el corazon, pareciendole aquellos lugares acomodados para las aventuras que buscaba" (I, XXIII, 278-9). Es probable (si se nos concede licencia para una

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 1989-Mln
TL;DR: The Autobiography of a Run Away Slave (1966) as mentioned in this paper was published after the triumph of the Cuban Revolution and described the life of Esteban Montejo, a 105 year old runaway slave who remembered his past with exceptional clarity.
Abstract: Miguel Barnet's The Autobiography of a Run Away Slave (1966), published after the triumph of the Cuban Revolution, is of historical importance. It covers the periods during and after slavery and describes the life of Esteban Montejo, a 105 year old runaway slave who remembers his past with exceptional clarity. Montejo's recollections are illuminating and demystifying, often challenging accepted notions of Cuban history. Barnet, a Cuban ethnologist, wrote the "autobiography" from interviews with Montejo which he transcribed and edited. Barnet's narration is part of a contiguous structure which,

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 1989-Mln
TL;DR: Maria (1867), de Jorge Isaacs, es la novela nacional de Colombia,1 and probablemente la de mayor popularidad en toda Hispanoamerica until hace muy poco as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Maria (1867), de Jorge Isaacs, es la novela nacional de Colombia,1 y probablemente la de mayor popularidad en toda Hispanoamerica hasta hace muy poco. Ha sido ma's leida y ma's imitada que ninguna otra novela, y tambien ha sido tema de peliculas, tanto antiguas como recientes.2 Mas su abrumadora acogida y su consagracion canonica son sorprendentes, casi perversas, ya que Maria dista mucho de la literatura comprometida de la epoca hecha en Colombia y en el resto de America Latina.3 Una novela como Man-

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jan 1989-Mln
TL;DR: The Orlando Furzoso, most famous for its buoyant exposition of fabulous adventures, sustains a constant dialogue with important social concerns of the sixteenth century as discussed by the authors, both the narrative events developed in the poem and moral arguments made by Ariosto's characters function as vehicles for the poet's meditations on life in an increasingly complex world.
Abstract: The Orlando Furzoso, most famed for its buoyant exposition of fabulous adventures, sustains a constant dialogue with important social concerns of the sixteenth century. Both the narrative events developed in the poem and moral arguments made by Ariosto's characters function as vehicles for the poet's meditations on life in an increasingly complex world. In still another register, the poem's narrator directly addresses the reader in order to draw explicit attention to the topical relevance of the Furzoso's chivalric adventures. This didactic voice, most evident in the proems to the Furioso's individual cantos (but not confined to them), encouraged Ariosto's contemporary readers not simply to reflect on current moral values, but also to evaluate political and social situations affecting the world they lived in.'

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 1989-Mln
TL;DR: In this paper, it is a "wet, ungenial summer" in Switzerland, everyone has been reading ghost stories to pass the time, and now Byron, in his playful, peremptory way, has proposed that each of you write one.
Abstract: It is a "wet, ungenial summer" in Switzerland, everyone has been reading ghost stories to pass the time, and now Byron, in his playful, peremptory way, has proposed that each of you write one. If, in this situation, you find that your story is not coming along, it is apparently one of the advantages of being an illustrious poetor, more precisely, of being two illustrious poets-that you can agree to blame your difficulties on "the platitude of prose," at which point the weather will suddenly clear and you can head off together for the mountains. Whereas, if you happen to be the wife of one of these poets and under his constant urging to "enrol [your]self on the page of fame," you may find yourself doubly immobilized, chained to the task of writing by your very inability to perform it. Thus Mary Shelley: