scispace - formally typeset
JournalISSN: 1748-3387

Nature Nanotechnology

About: Nature Nanotechnology is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Graphene & Carbon nanotube. It has an ISSN identifier of 1748-3387. Over the lifetime, 3890 publication(s) have been published receiving 648165 citation(s).

...read more

Topics: Graphene, Carbon nanotube, Quantum dot ...read more
Papers
  More

Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/NNANO.2012.193
Abstract: Single-layer metal dichalcogenides are two-dimensional semiconductors that present strong potential for electronic and sensing applications complementary to that of graphene.

...read more

11,301 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/NNANO.2010.279
Abstract: Two-dimensional materials are attractive for use in next-generation nanoelectronic devices because, compared to one-dimensional materials, it is relatively easy to fabricate complex structures from them. The most widely studied two-dimensional material is graphene, both because of its rich physics and its high mobility. However, pristine graphene does not have a bandgap, a property that is essential for many applications, including transistors. Engineering a graphene bandgap increases fabrication complexity and either reduces mobilities to the level of strained silicon films or requires high voltages. Although single layers of MoS(2) have a large intrinsic bandgap of 1.8 eV (ref. 16), previously reported mobilities in the 0.5-3 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) range are too low for practical devices. Here, we use a halfnium oxide gate dielectric to demonstrate a room-temperature single-layer MoS(2) mobility of at least 200 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), similar to that of graphene nanoribbons, and demonstrate transistors with room-temperature current on/off ratios of 1 × 10(8) and ultralow standby power dissipation. Because monolayer MoS(2) has a direct bandgap, it can be used to construct interband tunnel FETs, which offer lower power consumption than classical transistors. Monolayer MoS(2) could also complement graphene in applications that require thin transparent semiconductors, such as optoelectronics and energy harvesting.

...read more

Topics: Graphene nanoribbons (62%), Phosphorene (56%), Graphene (56%) ...read more

10,809 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/NNANO.2007.451
Dan Li1, Marc B. Müller1, Scott Gilje2, Richard B. Kaner2  +1 moreInstitutions (2)
Abstract: Graphene sheets offer extraordinary electronic, thermal and mechanical properties and are expected to find a variety of applications. A prerequisite for exploiting most proposed applications for graphene is the availability of processable graphene sheets in large quantities. The direct dispersion of hydrophobic graphite or graphene sheets in water without the assistance of dispersing agents has generally been considered to be an insurmountable challenge. Here we report that chemically converted graphene sheets obtained from graphite can readily form stable aqueous colloids through electrostatic stabilization. This discovery has enabled us to develop a facile approach to large-scale production of aqueous graphene dispersions without the need for polymeric or surfactant stabilizers. Our findings make it possible to process graphene materials using low-cost solution processing techniques, opening up enormous opportunities to use this unique carbon nanostructure for many technological applications.

...read more

  • Figure 5 Examples demonstrating that fi CCG dispersions using various solution
    Figure 5 Examples demonstrating that fi CCG dispersions using various solution
  • Figure 1 Scheme showing the chemical route to the synthesis of aqueous graphene dispersions. 1, Oxidation of graphite (black blocks) to graphite oxide (lighter coloured blocks) with greater interlayer distance. 2, Exfoliation of graphite oxide in water by son stabilized by electrostatic repulsion. 3, Controlled conversion of GO colloids to conducting graphene colloids through deoxygenation by hydrazine reduction.
    Figure 1 Scheme showing the chemical route to the synthesis of aqueous graphene dispersions. 1, Oxidation of graphite (black blocks) to graphite oxide (lighter coloured blocks) with greater interlayer distance. 2, Exfoliation of graphite oxide in water by son stabilized by electrostatic repulsion. 3, Controlled conversion of GO colloids to conducting graphene colloids through deoxygenation by hydrazine reduction.
  • Figure 2 Surface properties of GO and CCG. aqueous dispersions at a concentration of absorption band at around 1,700 cm at this range is observable but not as prominent as that observed for GO, likely due to the of the strong absorption of graphene sheets in this region.
    Figure 2 Surface properties of GO and CCG. aqueous dispersions at a concentration of absorption band at around 1,700 cm at this range is observable but not as prominent as that observed for GO, likely due to the of the strong absorption of graphene sheets in this region.
  • Figure 4 UV-vis absorption spectra showing the change of GO dispersions time. The absorption peak of the GO dispersion at absorption in the whole spectral region ( electronic conjugation within the graphene sheets is restored upon
    Figure 4 UV-vis absorption spectra showing the change of GO dispersions time. The absorption peak of the GO dispersion at absorption in the whole spectral region ( electronic conjugation within the graphene sheets is restored upon
  • Figure 3 Colloidal and morphological characterization of CCG dispersions.
    Figure 3 Colloidal and morphological characterization of CCG dispersions.

8,033 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/NNANO.2010.132
Sukang Bae1, Hyeongkeun Kim1, Youngbin Lee1, Xiangfan Xu2  +13 moreInstitutions (5)
Abstract: The outstanding electrical, mechanical and chemical properties of graphene make it attractive for applications in flexible electronics. However, efforts to make transparent conducting films from graphene have been hampered by the lack of efficient methods for the synthesis, transfer and doping of graphene at the scale and quality required for applications. Here, we report the roll-to-roll production and wet-chemical doping of predominantly monolayer 30-inch graphene films grown by chemical vapour deposition onto flexible copper substrates. The films have sheet resistances as low as approximately 125 ohms square(-1) with 97.4% optical transmittance, and exhibit the half-integer quantum Hall effect, indicating their high quality. We further use layer-by-layer stacking to fabricate a doped four-layer film and measure its sheet resistance at values as low as approximately 30 ohms square(-1) at approximately 90% transparency, which is superior to commercial transparent electrodes such as indium tin oxides. Graphene electrodes were incorporated into a fully functional touch-screen panel device capable of withstanding high strain.

...read more

Topics: Graphene oxide paper (62%), Transparent conducting film (62%), Graphene foam (61%) ...read more

7,199 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/NNANO.2007.387
Dan Peer1, Jeffrey M. Karp1, Jeffrey M. Karp2, Seungpyo Hong2  +3 moreInstitutions (3)
Abstract: Nanotechnology has the potential to revolutionize cancer diagnosis and therapy. Advances in protein engineering and materials science have contributed to novel nanoscale targeting approaches that may bring new hope to cancer patients. Several therapeutic nanocarriers have been approved for clinical use. However, to date, there are only a few clinically approved nanocarriers that incorporate molecules to selectively bind and target cancer cells. This review examines some of the approved formulations and discusses the challenges in translating basic research to the clinic. We detail the arsenal of nanocarriers and molecules available for selective tumour targeting, and emphasize the challenges in cancer treatment.

...read more

Topics: Nanocarriers (60%)

6,758 Citations


Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
2021213
2020182
2019213
2018234
2017266
2016238

Top Attributes

Show by:

Journal's top 5 most impactful authors

Adarsh Sandhu

116 papers, 141 citations

Tim Reid

77 papers, 18 citations

Owain Vaughan

63 papers, 74 citations

Kenji Watanabe

44 papers, 10.8K citations

Jessica Thomas

42 papers, 24 citations

Network Information
Related Journals (5)
Nano Letters

18K papers, 1.9M citations

92% related
ACS Nano

16.7K papers, 1.4M citations

91% related
Nature Materials

4.7K papers, 1.1M citations

90% related
Nano Today

1K papers, 85.1K citations

88% related
Small

11.4K papers, 552.7K citations

87% related