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JournalISSN: 1759-4774

Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology

About: Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Cancer & Breast cancer. It has an ISSN identifier of 1759-4774. Over the lifetime, 3226 publication(s) have been published receiving 140514 citation(s). The journal is also known as: Nature reviews. Clinical oncology.

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Topics: Cancer, Breast cancer, Radiation therapy ...read more
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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/NRCLINONC.2010.139
Abstract: Recent advances in nanotechnology have offered new hope for cancer detection, prevention, and treatment. While the enhanced permeability and retention effect has served as a key rationale for using nanoparticles to treat solid tumors, it does not enable uniform delivery of these particles to all regions of tumors in sufficient quantities. This heterogeneous distribution of therapeutics is a result of physiological barriers presented by the abnormal tumor vasculature and interstitial matrix. These barriers are likely to be responsible for the modest survival benefit offered by many FDA-approved nanotherapeutics and must be overcome for the promise of nanomedicine in patients to be realized. Here, we review these barriers to the delivery of cancer therapeutics and summarize strategies that have been developed to overcome these barriers. Finally, we discuss design considerations for optimizing the delivery of nanoparticles to tumors.

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2,367 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/NRCLINONC.2016.217
Abstract: Macrophages are crucial drivers of tumour-promoting inflammation. Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) contribute to tumour progression at different levels: by promoting genetic instability, nurturing cancer stem cells, supporting metastasis, and taming protective adaptive immunity. TAMs can exert a dual, yin-yang influence on the effectiveness of cytoreductive therapies (chemotherapy and radiotherapy), either antagonizing the antitumour activity of these treatments by orchestrating a tumour-promoting, tissue-repair response or, instead, enhancing the overall antineoplastic effect. TAMs express molecular triggers of checkpoint proteins that regulate T-cell activation, and are targets of certain checkpoint-blockade immunotherapies. Other macrophage-centred approaches to anticancer therapy are under investigation, and include: inhibition of macrophage recruitment to, and/or survival in, tumours; functional re-education of TAMs to an antitumour, 'M1-like' mode; and tumour-targeting monoclonal antibodies that elicit macrophage-mediated extracellular killing, or phagocytosis and intracellular destruction of cancer cells. The evidence supporting these strategies is reviewed herein. We surmise that TAMs can provide tools to tailor the use of cytoreductive therapies and immunotherapy in a personalized medicine approach, and that TAM-focused therapeutic strategies have the potential to complement and synergize with both chemotherapy and immunotherapy.

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Topics: Cancer immunotherapy (53%), Immunotherapy (53%), Cancer stem cell (51%)

1,499 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/NRCLINONC.2017.141
Abstract: Radiomics, the high-throughput mining of quantitative image features from standard-of-care medical imaging that enables data to be extracted and applied within clinical-decision support systems to improve diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive accuracy, is gaining importance in cancer research. Radiomic analysis exploits sophisticated image analysis tools and the rapid development and validation of medical imaging data that uses image-based signatures for precision diagnosis and treatment, providing a powerful tool in modern medicine. Herein, we describe the process of radiomics, its pitfalls, challenges, opportunities, and its capacity to improve clinical decision making, emphasizing the utility for patients with cancer. Currently, the field of radiomics lacks standardized evaluation of both the scientific integrity and the clinical relevance of the numerous published radiomics investigations resulting from the rapid growth of this area. Rigorous evaluation criteria and reporting guidelines need to be established in order for radiomics to mature as a discipline. Herein, we provide guidance for investigations to meet this urgent need in the field of radiomics.

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  • Figure 5 | Schematic overview of a clinical decision-support system graphical user interface illustrating the concept of delta-radiomics. In this example, a clinician requests the radiomic analysis of a patient on the basis of combined longitudinal PET–CT images, potentially enabling improved diagnosis, early response pr diction, improved clinical decision-making and, consequently, a better prognosis.
    Figure 5 | Schematic overview of a clinical decision-support system graphical user interface illustrating the concept of delta-radiomics. In this example, a clinician requests the radiomic analysis of a patient on the basis of combined longitudinal PET–CT images, potentially enabling improved diagnosis, early response pr diction, improved clinical decision-making and, consequently, a better prognosis.
  • Figure 4 | Radiogenomics analysis can reveal relationships between imaging phenotypes and gene-expression patterns. Such relationships can include expressions of individual genes as well as measures that summarize expressions of specific gene subsets.
    Figure 4 | Radiogenomics analysis can reveal relationships between imaging phenotypes and gene-expression patterns. Such relationships can include expressions of individual genes as well as measures that summarize expressions of specific gene subsets.
  • Figure 1 | Flowchart depicting the workflow of radiomics and the application of the RQS. The workflow includes the necessary steps in a radiomic analysis. The RQS both rewards and penalizes the methodology and analyses of a study, consequently encouraging the best scientific practice. RSQ, radiomics quality score; VOI, volume of interest.
    Figure 1 | Flowchart depicting the workflow of radiomics and the application of the RQS. The workflow includes the necessary steps in a radiomic analysis. The RQS both rewards and penalizes the methodology and analyses of a study, consequently encouraging the best scientific practice. RSQ, radiomics quality score; VOI, volume of interest.
  • Figure 2 | Radiomics in cardiology. The current gold standard for quantification of coronary calcifications visible on CT is the ‘Agatston’ method (based upon intensity and volume). Radiomic features can improve quantification, differentiation between calcified and non-calcified plaques, and thus the prediction of Major Adverse Cardiac Events (MACE).
    Figure 2 | Radiomics in cardiology. The current gold standard for quantification of coronary calcifications visible on CT is the ‘Agatston’ method (based upon intensity and volume). Radiomic features can improve quantification, differentiation between calcified and non-calcified plaques, and thus the prediction of Major Adverse Cardiac Events (MACE).
Topics: Modern medicine (51%)

1,402 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/NRCLINONC.2013.110
Abstract: Cancer is associated with mutated genes, and analysis of tumour-linked genetic alterations is increasingly used for diagnostic, prognostic and treatment purposes. The genetic profile of solid tumours is currently obtained from surgical or biopsy specimens; however, the latter procedure cannot always be performed routinely owing to its invasive nature. Information acquired from a single biopsy provides a spatially and temporally limited snap-shot of a tumour and might fail to reflect its heterogeneity. Tumour cells release circulating free DNA (cfDNA) into the blood, but the majority of circulating DNA is often not of cancerous origin, and detection of cancer-associated alleles in the blood has long been impossible to achieve. Technological advances have overcome these restrictions, making it possible to identify both genetic and epigenetic aberrations. A liquid biopsy, or blood sample, can provide the genetic landscape of all cancerous lesions (primary and metastases) as well as offering the opportunity to systematically track genomic evolution. This Review will explore how tumour-associated mutations detectable in the blood can be used in the clinic after diagnosis, including the assessment of prognosis, early detection of disease recurrence, and as surrogates for traditional biopsies with the purpose of predicting response to treatments and the development of acquired resistance.

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Topics: Liquid biopsy (66%), Cancer biomarkers (55%), Biopsy (54%)

1,183 Citations


Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1038/NRCLINONC.2016.66
Abstract: Chemotherapy is the primary established systemic treatment for patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) in both the early and advanced-stages of the disease. The lack of targeted therapies and the poor prognosis of patients with TNBC have fostered a major effort to discover actionable molecular targets to treat patients with these tumours. Massively parallel sequencing and other 'omics' technologies have revealed an unexpected level of heterogeneity of TNBCs and have led to the identification of potentially actionable molecular features in some TNBCs, such as germline BRCA1/2 mutations or 'BRCAness', the presence of the androgen receptor, and several rare genomic alterations. Whether these alterations are molecular 'drivers', however, has not been clearly established. A subgroup of TNBCs shows a high degree of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes that also correlates with a lower risk of disease relapse and a higher likelihood of benefit from chemotherapy. Proof-of-principle studies with immune-checkpoint inhibitors in advanced-stage TNBC have yielded promising results, indicating the potential benefit of immunotherapy for patients with TNBC. In this Review, we discuss the most relevant molecular findings in TNBC from the past decade and the most promising therapeutic opportunities derived from these data.

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1,155 Citations


Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
2021138
2020143
2019170
2018190
2017214
2016208

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Journal's top 5 most impactful authors

Lisa Hutchinson

237 papers, 968 citations

Peter Sidaway

193 papers, 428 citations

David Killock

182 papers, 336 citations

Diana Romero

143 papers, 234 citations

Rebecca Kirk

89 papers, 489 citations

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