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Showing papers in "Necsus. European Journal of Media Studies in 2015"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the context of advanced optical and tracking technologies that render animals permanently visible, the possibility of not-seeing emerges as a progressive modality of relation to animals that takes seriously the notion of animal privacy and the exposed animal resistance to the human gaze.
Abstract: Revisiting John Berger’s seminal essay ‘Why Look at Animals?’ (1980), this essay inverts Berger’s title in order to explore instances where the visibility of animals is at stake and where seeing is linked to forms of surveillance and control. In the context of advanced optical and tracking technologies that render animals permanently visible, the possibility of not-seeing emerges as a progressive modality of relation to animals that takes seriously the notion of animal privacy and the exposed animal’s resistance to the human gaze.

31 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine the various ways in which Super 8 film as a media technology from the past is re-appropriated and remediated in contemporary memory practices by looking specifically at restorative and reflective forms of technostalgia manifest in the project Bye Bye Super 8 -In Loving Memory of Kodachrome and the digital smartphone app iSupr8.
Abstract: This article reflects on today’s ‘technostalgic’ trend in media culture by examining the various ways in which Super 8 film as a media technology from the past is re-appropriated and remediated in contemporary memory practices. By looking specifically at restorative and reflective forms of technostalgia manifest in the project Bye Bye Super 8 – In Loving Memory of Kodachrome (2011) and the digital smartphone app iSupr8 (2011), the author explores how in contemporary memory practices media technologies not only construct and mediate memories but have also become the objects of memory themselves. While analysing this double mnemonic process – accounting for both the memory construction by the media technology and the reminiscence of the media technology itself – it is argued that we currently witness a new kind of memory practice enforcing an attentive shift from technologies of memory to a memory of technologies.

20 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a theoretical and historical exploration of the evolution of the concept of "vintage" prior to the 20th century is presented, in contrast to retro and kitsch (notions with which it is often blurred).
Abstract: The term ‘vintage’ is common in our modern-day vocabulary. The concept to which it refers is familiar in the fields of oenology and fashion studies but has also, more recently, appeared in those of media and cultural studies. However, a theoretical and historical exploration of its evolution prior to the 20th century is still missing from much literature. This article is a first attempt to fill this gap by discussing patterns of vintage in contrast to retro and kitsch (notions with which it is often blurred). Vintage and its relationship with nostalgia and media are then analysed as part of the discourses and practices that engage with contemporary obsessions with the past. An examination of historical and more recent vintage patterns also leads us to discuss the uses and production of analogue and digital vintage objects. On a more general level this reflection on vintage within media studies might also be inspiring for other research or professional domains.

17 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article explored the definition of "vintage cinema" and specifically re-evaluated the fetishism for the past and its regurgitation in the present by providing a taxonomy of the phenomenon in recent film production.
Abstract: This article explores the definition of ‘vintage cinema’ and specifically re-evaluates the fetishism for the past and its regurgitation in the present by providing a taxonomy of the phenomenon in recent film production. Our contribution identifies three aesthetic categories: faux-vintage, retro and anachronistic; by illustrating their overlapping and discrepancies it argues that the past remains a powerful negotiator of meaning for the present and the future. Drawing on studies of memory and digital nostalgia, this article focuses on the latter category: anachronism. It furthermore unravels the persistence of and the filmic fascination for obsolete analogue objects through an analysis of Only Lovers Left Alive (Jim Jarmusch, 2013).

9 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The latest instalment of The Key Debates series as mentioned in this paper was the first edition of the Feminisms: Diversity, Difference, and Multiplicity in Contemporary Film Cultures (FDF) symposium, edited by Laura Mulvey and Anna Backman Rogers.
Abstract: Forty years after the publication of her seminal essay ‘Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema’ in Screen, Laura Mulvey, together with Anna Backman Rogers, has edited Feminisms: Diversity, Difference, and Multiplicity in Contemporary Film Cultures, which is the latest instalment of The Key Debates series. NECSUS invited Laura Mulvey and Anna Backman Rogers to join Annie van den Oever, editor of NECSUS and series editor of The Key Debates, in a ‘triologue’, which in part reflects and re-emphasises the topics publicly discussed during the Feminisms symposia.

7 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Sobchack as mentioned in this paper describes how, when writing in first person mode, she leaves "me" (in the egological sense) to look at the structure of the experience I was writing about, to move into the domain of a more general experiential structure that anybody might inhabit.
Abstract: Vivian Sobchack: As a phenomenologist, I very often, although certainly not always, begin with my own specific experience as I start thinking and writing something. And then I generalize these specifics as larger structures of experience. [ . . .E]ven when I’m in first person mode, I leave ‘me’ (in the egological sense) to look at the structure of the experience I’m writing about, to move into the domain of a more general experiential structure that anybody might inhabit. I start from me but it’s not about me. [ . . . ] Scott Bukatman [to Sobchack]: It seems to me that what you do is a close reading of a medium. [. . . Y]ou may use a work to illuminate the medium itself. I first saw the sequence from René Clément’s 1963 wartime resistance romance Le Jour et l’heure (The Day and the Hour) when film critic David https://vimeo.com/119051190

7 citations



Journal Article
TL;DR: This paper explored the definition of "vintage cinema" and specifically re-evaluated the fetishism for the past and its regurgitation in the present by providing a taxonomy of the phenomenon in recent film production.
Abstract: This article explores the definition of ‘vintage cinema’ and specifically re-evaluates the fetishism for the past and its regurgitation in the present by providing a taxonomy of the phenomenon in recent film production. Our contribution identifies three aesthetic categories: faux-vintage, retro and anachronistic; by illustrating their overlapping and discrepancies it argues that the past remains a powerful negotiator of meaning for the present and the future. Drawing on studies of memory and digital nostalgia, this article focuses on the latter category: anachronism. It furthermore unravels the persistence of and the filmic fascination for obsolete analogue objects through an analysis of Only Lovers Left Alive (Jim Jarmusch, 2013).

6 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Deleuze elaborates accounts of cinematic time and of becoming-animal quite separately, without addressing potential links between these accounts as discussed by the authors, and allows these accounts to intersect through a reading of the aesthetics of slowness in the documentary art film Bovines ou la vraie vie des vaches (The True Life of Cows, Emmanuel Gras, 2012).
Abstract: Deleuze elaborates accounts of cinematic time and of becoming-animal quite separately, without addressing potential links between these accounts. Drawing on a range of works by Deleuze and Guattari, this article allows these accounts to intersect through a reading of the aesthetics of slowness in the documentary art film Bovines ou la vraie vie des vaches (The True Life of Cows, Emmanuel Gras, 2012) and its generative focus on (de)territorialisation, becoming, and affect. In privileging what Peter Hallward calls ‘virtual creatings’ over ‘actual creatures’, Bovines implicitly proposes a celebration of biovitality rather than an interrogation of biopolitics, pointing to the possible political limitations of the film and of the Deleuzo-Guattarian framework

6 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore how two divergent examples of the nonfiction moving image can be understood in relation to the problem of representing species loss, namely the thylacine, better known as the Tasmanian tiger and the polar bear.
Abstract: In this essay I explore how two divergent examples of the nonfiction moving image can be understood in relation to the problem of representing species loss. The species that provide the platform for this consideration are the thylacine, better known as the Tasmanian tiger, and the polar bear. They represent the two contingencies of species loss: endangerment and extinction. My analysis is structured around moving images from the 1930s of the last known thylacine and the very different example of Arctic Tale (Adam Ravetch, Sarah Robertson, 2007), a ‘Disneyfied’ film that dramatises climate change and its impact on the polar bear. Species loss is frequently perceived in a humanist sense, reflecting how we ‘imagine ourselves’ or anthropocentric charactersations of non-human others. I offer a close analysis of the two films, examining the problem of representing extinction through a consideration of the play of absence and presence, vitality and extinguishment, that characterises both the ontology of cinema and narratives about species loss.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors investigated the relationship between gesture capture and biopolitical capture of life, and the way in which cinema came to compensate for such a reductive version of corporeality by constructing the concept of an individual located as complex interiority.
Abstract: Agamben’s essay on gesture is perhaps his most influential piece of work for film studies, in which he argues that cinema at its inception captures the moment at which humans have lost control of their gestures, manifest in a crisis of communicability. Comparing the traces of the gesticulating bodies of Gilles de la Tourette’s patients with those in the proto-cinematic series of photographs taken by EadwardMuybridge, Agamben suggests that these are the twin processes of a biopolitical production of life; respectively, the body as the site of investigation and the exemplary body put to work. Yet the ethicopolitical implications of Agamben’s essay on gesture and the biopolitical production of life are relatively under-developed. This article pursues not only cinema’s relation to biopolitical capture but also theway inwhich cinema came to compensate for such a reductive version of corporeality by constructing the concept of an individual located as complex interiority. When gestural communication declines at the close of the 19 century meaning is relocated to the internal space within the human body; commensurate with this production of human interiority as a site of truth, cinema becomes a machine whose task is to decipher the turmoil of the inside, a process reproduced as narrative explication.



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Bela Tarrrs latest and reputedly final film, The Turin Horse (2011), takes its prompt from the story about an encounter that Nietzsche claims to have experienced with a maltreated horse on Via Carlo Alberto, Turin this article.
Abstract: Bela Tarrrs latest and reputedly final film, The Turin Horse (2011), takes its prompt from the story about an encounter that Nietzsche claims to have experienced with a maltreated horse on Via Carlo Alberto, Turin.[1] Tarrrs film opens with an image of a large horse pulling a cart through the bleak, inhospitable Hungarian landscape. The mare (Ricsi) walks toward the camera, seen in close-up and from a low angle; blinkered and with a sweat-matted coat, she progresses...

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that anthropocentrism has become particularly marked in modernity despite the avowal by some theorists that modernity signified a radical break with traditional approaches, and that a powerful strategy invoked by such discourses, and designed to cement the anthropocentric perspective, is that of contradiction.
Abstract: Anthropocentrism is central to the nature of discourse across all disciplines, from science to philosophy and the arts. We argue that anthropocentrism has become particularly marked in modernity despite the avowal by some theorists that modernity signified a radical break with traditional approaches. A powerful strategy, invoked by such discourses, and designed to cement the anthropocentric perspective, is that of contradiction. Media theorists and scholars working in the broader field of (human) animal studies have begun to unravel and demystify such discourses, questioning the nature of these contradictory perspectives and the anthropocentric point of view at work in visual texts. This is particularly evident in the current work of contemporary theorists who are researching the representation of animals in media texts. For it is the figure of the animal, as represented in visual discourses, from film to photography and new media, that offers a powerful challenge to the dominant anthropocentric worldview.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Caldwell's Televisuality: Style, Crisis and Authority in American Television familiarised media studies with a heterodox methodology, mixing formal analysis and technical insights with work floor knowledge with elaborate theorising as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: In 1995, John Caldwell’s Televisuality: Style, Crisis and Authority in American Television familiarised media studies with a heterodox methodology, mixing formal analysis and technical insights with work floor knowledge with elaborate theorising. In this interview Caldwell describes how this approach emerged from a conjuncture of practices as different as art school, farm labor, and high theory. Instead of defining the theoretical essence of the medium this combination of approaches allowed for a recursive mapping and drilling of television’s dynamics. Caldwell claims the ‘commercial media industrial systems’ can neither be understood nor effectively criticised with a one-sizefits-all approach; rather, only if we seriously take into account the changing concepts and practices that emerge within these systems. This also requires a pedagogy which does not teach a well-defined model of analysis but rather makes room for collaborative, open-ended research.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The International Film Festival Rotterdam (IFR) as mentioned in this paper was held from 21 January until 1 February 2015 and it was the 44 edition of the IFFR. For Rutger Wolfson it was his last festival as director.
Abstract: From 21 January until 1 February 2015 the 44 edition of the International Film Festival Rotterdam was held. For Rutger Wolfson it was his last festival as director. A couple of weeks earlier he had announced he would step down after this edition. In 2004 Wolfson had joined the festival board and in 2008 he became festival director. With a background in the arts world, Wolfson had no notable experience with film prior to his appointments at IFFR. 2 Moreover, in the eight years of his leadership developments in both the global arena and on a national level challenged IFFR’s position as a noteworthy event on the film festival calendar. Critics questioned if Rotterdam was able to maintain relevance in competition with other international festivals. In 2014 Neil Young published a strong critique that gave voice to a growing sentiment among international film professionals that the festival had been steadily losing its programming edge, in particular with regard to being a platform for launching new talent. Locally the festival was troubled by declining audience numbers, dropping from a peak of 367,000 in 2007 (coincidentally or not the last festival led by Sandra den Hamer) to 274,000 in 2012, after which a modest increase set in again. That the festival succeeded in reversing a five-year decline in audience numbers is significant in light of contemporary Dutch cultural policy which has been dominated by far-reaching cutbacks across the cultural sector since the financial crisis; cutbacks, moreover, that went hand in hand with an increasing push to legitimise the funding that was maintained in terms of audience demand. Clearly it is not an easy assignment to both lure seasoned film professionals and tap into new audiences, but the IFFR is committed to offer a broad festival where vastly different cinephiles should be able to find something to their liking. This dossier takes the temperature of the 2015 festival and assesses the quality and success of some selected programs. It is the result of work by students in the





Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Festival de Cine de Lima (Lima Film Festival) was launched in 1997 as elcine with ten days of screenings composed of 21 features and 38 shorts from ten Latin American countries alongside a three-day event in the southern city of Arequipa as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: The Festival de Cine de Lima (Lima Film Festival) was launched in 1997 as ‘elcine’ with ten days of screenings composed of 21 features and 38 shorts from ten Latin American countries alongside a three-day event in the southern city of Arequipa. Over 15,000 spectators attended what was described by its organisers as an ‘unprecedented event’[1] – not just for its statistics but also for the way it encouraged private enterprise to support a major cultural activity, involved many young people in its organisation, included events designed to provoke debate about the value of cinema, sparked mass participation on the part of the public through its competition voting system, and caught the attention of the national and international press. In August 2015, the 19th edition introduced around 300 international films to audiences across the Peruvian capital and beyond, with more of those films than ever before made by Peruvian directors, including several selected for the feature competition. Indeed, while many of the original features of this resilient festival have been retained it has been intriguing to witness the gradual increase in profile granted by the event to home-grown talent. After years of tension and mistrust between the most prominent film critics in Peru and many local film-makers battling with a precarious set of cultural, political, and financial circumstances, this change signals a welcome recognition of national production by those that have tended to look beyond national borders for inspiration. Moreover, despite the relative paucity of co-ordinated film production activity in Peru compared with other Latin American nations, it would seem that this festival (and other smaller film events that have emerged around the city over the last two decades[2]) provides some evidence of a growing interest in cinema ‘made in Peru’. This article aims to shed some light on the development of this key cultural event, to unravel its role as instigator and mediator of national and regional cinema, and to consider its place as part of the film ecology of Peru.


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on the artist's videos, reading them as an extension of both his films and his sculptural production, but which takes a more explicit stance than either.
Abstract: While he is appreciated primarily as a sculptor, Richard Serra also made several films and videos in the 1960s and 1970s which have a pivotal role in both the history of avant-garde film and the development of early video art. This article takes into account this ‘collateral’ production, suggesting that Serra’s work is not merely formalist or materialist. Rather, as his video work suggests, his larger sculptural works and conceptual approach require a reinterpretation as commentaries on social and political issues. This essay focuses on the artist’s videos, reading them as an extension of both his films and his sculptural production, but which takes a more explicit stance than either. The essay will also take into account the similarities between Serra’s stance and that of the contemporary Guerrilla Television movement, trying to position them within the articulated history of the relationships between contemporary art andmass media.


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The game has been criticized for its mindless mechanics, which require little more than repeated clicking on its colourful icons as discussed by the authors, leading to soulless inanity and the paucity of a dairy cow's punishing daily existence and untimely end.
Abstract: The social network game Farmville, which allows players to grow crops, raise animals, and produce a variety of goods, proved enormously successful within a year of its launch in 2009, attracting 110 million Facebook users. The game has been criticized, however, for its mindless mechanics, which require little more than repeated clicking on its colourful icons. By way of parody, Ian Bogost’s Cow Clicker permits its players simply to click on a picture of a cow once every six hours. In this essay I extend Bogost’s critique, and suggest that Cow Clicker highlights not just the soulless inanity of Farmville’s gameplay, but also the paucity of that game’s portrayal of the painful reality of a dairy cow’s punishing daily existence and untimely end.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Centaur is a specific totem for a libidinal ecology of souls, striving to understand themselves as simultaneously creaturely and spiritual as discussed by the authors, and it allowed both a recognition and a disavowal of the nonhuman basis (and telos) of non-human basis.
Abstract: The brief triangular love between Nietzche, Salomé, and Rée – as crystallised in the famous photograph of kitsch (literal) horse-play, where the woman is depicted as treating the two men as beasts of burden – allows us to consider the role of ‘creaturely love’ in our more general understanding of the lover’s discourse. That is to say, through such images we can explore the role and figure of the animal within ‘the anthropological machine’, itself designed to produce a sense of the human from the inhuman (especially through mediated forms of intimacy). Further, in the different intermedial relationships between photography, poetry, and philosophy, the Centaur – in the letters and texts circulated by this group (later including Rilke) – provides a charged specific totem for a libidinal ecology of souls, striving to understand themselves as simultaneously creaturely and spiritual. Such a figure allowed both a recognition and a disavowal of the nonhuman basis (and telos) of