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Showing papers in "New Writing in 2008"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors focus on grading short stories at the undergraduate level by using rubrics designed in conjunction with various theoretical texts, including Seymour Chatman's Reading Narrative Fict...
Abstract: The question of grading creative work is one that troubles creative writing professors and their students, as well as other English Literature faculty who may have to evaluate student creative work (e.g., in senior theses). Professors and students often confuse the merit of the authors’ intentions with that of the finished product. If we continue to believe that creative writers work automatically – that fiction is a byproduct of subconscious inspiration – then we cannot adequately assess the quality of creative writing. The myth of automatic writing must be broken: there must be a paradigm shift in how we view the creative process. Narrative theory is key in teaching and grading creative writing; it can be used effectively to establish grading rubrics that clarify the evaluation process. In particular, this article focuses on grading short stories at the undergraduate level by using rubrics designed in conjunction with various theoretical texts, including Seymour Chatman's Reading Narrative Fict...

19 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In a citation of my book Far Language, Perloff (2004: 155), in the introduction to an essay on contemporary poetic innovation, refers to me as a "poet-critic" as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: In a citation of my book Far Language, Perloff (2004: 155), in the introduction to an essay on contemporary poetic innovation, refers to me as a ‘poet-critic’. The assignation surprised me on first seeing it. Its hyphen appears to announce an uneasy hybrid that looks dangerously as though it has yoked by violence together two incompatibilities. It suggests that unity is achieved by pressurised cohabitation, force of will. And yet, it is unity of purpose and project but not of product I would like to emphasise in this presentation of my work. The unity is achieved by introducing a third term, poetics, not just as mediator between the scholarly research of the critic and the practice-led research creative writing of the poet, although it is also that. Poetics has been open to a variety of misunderstandings. The first, and apparently most obvious, is that it has something to do with poetry. Or with poetry alone. I’m not going to help that impression tonight by almost exclusively referring to poetry, but that’s because I am a ‘poet-critic’. But I’d like to stress that while poetry and poetics share etymological roots they both derive from the Greek verb ‘to make’ poetics, as the thinking about how something is made, can be used with reference to all kinds of writing (and not just writing, and not even just art). Poetics is as relevant to the writer of supposedly formulaic writing, like the crime novel, as it is to the most experimental writing which involves the setting up of systems to produce unforeseen textual effects. On the one hand you’ve Raymond Chandler’s

13 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article found that most contemporary Australian poets have described experiences of composing at speeds where it is simply too fast to think, and a majority have stated that rapid and unpremeditated composition is their dominant mode of producing.
Abstract: How are poetic ideas thought up? This paper is part of a broader project on the relations between poetry and knowledge. I have been interviewing contemporary Australian poets to find out how knowledge processes pertain to their work. In the process I've learnt some surprising things – such as the fact that most of my subjects have described experiences of composing at speeds where it is simply too fast to think. Indeed, a majority have stated that rapid and unpremeditated composition is their dominant mode of producing. In this paper, I contrast my findings, and those of prior writers on the topic of rapid knowledge (Kleist, Wordsworth, Auden, Heidegger), with the recent neurological research of Antonio Damasio. Damasio postulates that human decision-making is in general conducted at speeds that are too fast to be fully conscious. In the process, Damasio offers interesting possibilities for hypothesising the pre-conscious mechanisms that poets draw upon when the words come into their heads.

10 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that a diachronic approach to the teaching of craft will enable formal elements of fiction to be used as heuristic devices for historicising writing samples, thus opening up possibilities for refining and adapting these elements to the concerns of contemporary writers.
Abstract: This essay argues that creative writing pedagogy relies upon a dehistoricised approach to the notion of ‘craft’ in which the formal elements of fiction, such as voice and point of view (POV), are conceptualised as static and unchanging ‘building blocks’ for writers. Illustrative samples of writing are thus understood synchronically, disavowing the historical contingency and mutabiltity of formal categories. The essay argues that a diachronic approach to the teaching of craft will enable formal elements of fiction to be used as heuristic devices for historicising writing samples, thus opening up possibilities for refining and adapting these elements to the concerns of contemporary writers. As a case study, the essay analyses the way in which handbooks produced by teachers of creative writing adopt a ‘pros’ and ‘con's’ approach to the use of narrative voice. This approach, in the guise of ‘practical advice’, perpetuates a modernist aesthetic prejudice for impersonal modes of narration. The essay wi...

5 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: By extending the notion of writing to include oxymoronic genres and pictorial, stylistic, and hypertextual elements, the authors hope to extend the possibilities of text production beyond those usually afforded to students, beyond essays and prose on the one hand, and poems and stories on the other.
Abstract: By extending the notion of ‘academic’ writing to include heuristic, figurative, reflexive, and ‘messy’ textualities, I hope to escape the restrictions associated with essay, article, and thesis writing. Few students, it seems, ever attempt to make their ‘academic’ pieces creative or evocative in the same way they do their poems or stories; in fact, they usually ‘play dead’ when it comes to formal writing. Such is the tyranny of the conventional essay on artistic thinking and creative practice. Creative writers, too, seldom venture beyond the formal elements of genre or genre itself. By extending the notion of ‘writing’ to include oxymoronic genres and pictorial, stylistic, and hypertextual elements, I hope to extend the possibilities of text production beyond those usually afforded to students; that is, beyond essays and prose on the one hand, and poems and stories on the other. Various textual theories and practices have helped me in this process: picto-ideo-phonographic writing, autoethnography...

5 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the wake of September 11, 2001, a debate took place in the literary pages of newspapers and journals across the western world reflecting widespread anxiety about the relevance of literature as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: In the wake of September 11, a debate took place in the literary pages of newspapers and journals across the western world reflecting widespread anxiety about the relevance of literature. Editors asked whether literature was capable of keeping up with the increased complexity of contemporary life, or, indeed, whether literature should been seen as having a social function at all. This paper addresses the fate of the socially focused novel of the last two centuries. It argues that the dream of the social novel is primarily a political rather than an aesthetic one, and that, in this sense, the social novel must not only address the social in its content and form, but must in some sense be enfranchised as a social object, and circulate as such. This raises questions about the role of the writer and of an increasingly marginalised (and marginalizing) concept of literature in contemporary consumer capitalist society.

2 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For instance, Taggart as discussed by the authors argues that creative writing is more instinctive, intuitive and formally open than other kinds of writing, and tends to have relatively little extrinsic or utilitarian value.
Abstract: Dear Students of Amy, When Professor Taggart (Amy) recently asked me to speak about creative writing to your Introduction to Writing Studies class, I was of course glad to accept. Because I’m only one of two creative writing teachers in my department, I sometimes find myself in the role of apologist or not very confident authority, especially when defining or trying to justify creative writing to students, administrators and my more scholarly colleagues. But I admit I enjoy the challenge, and am even a little obsessed with the question of how creative writing is, or should be, understood within the whole spectrum of writing types and English Studies as a whole. In some ways the answer seems simple enough: creative writing is well, more creative than other kinds of writing. It’s more instinctive, intuitive and formally open, and tends to have relatively little extrinsic or utilitarian value. But any examination of these remarks immediately raises a number of hulking questions, and the subject finally is one which gets pretty stormy and steamy among both theorists and creative writers themselves. We know that most kinds of writing can be in their own ways ‘creative’, and that what we call ‘creative writing’ can be philosophical or expository or even practical (as in its therapeutic and ceremonial functions). We also know that creative writing is never purely ‘open’; that any number of complex formal, generic, and cultural rules and codes are in operation in any given creative work. So what, exactly, distinguishes creative writing as creative writing? Does such a distinction even matter? How does ‘creative writing’ compare fundamentally to the kinds of writing especially the scholarly which you’re expected most often to practice in the university? What I’d like to do in this letter is locate creative writing by exploring how its practitioners, in particular contemporary lyric poets, engage with these or any questions. Please note, however, that I’m not seeking all-inclusive definitions, since I see

1 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Yasuko Nagai1
TL;DR: This paper presented an incorporation of local knowledge when introducing educational theories and practices to a local community in Papua New Guinea, and described a process of local people with strong oral tradition beginning to understand theories of creative writing by actually practising to create stories.
Abstract: Unlike the previous one-way transmission of Western knowledge to indigenous societies, this study presents an incorporation of local knowledge when introducing educational theories and practices to a local community in Papua New Guinea. This study also describes a process of local people with strong oral tradition beginning to understand theories of creative writing by actually practising to create stories. It is a collaborative study between local indigenous teachers, who play the major role, and the researcher, who plays the role of facilitator.

1 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper explored the collaborative relationship between a supervisor and his student, a master of his subject and his apprentice, in creating and developing a children's picture story book as early preparation for a PhD.
Abstract: This paper explores the collaborative relationship between a supervisor and his student, a master of his subject and his apprentice, in creating and developing a children's picture story book as early preparation for a PhD.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a sequence of texts (radio play, short stories, screenplay) reworking Red Riding Hood works through this contradiction intertextually to throw light on the use of ambivalence as an intellectual strategy entailing both a structuration (a reflection on ambivalance) and destructuration (the ambivalent refusal to reify ambivalience).
Abstract: The phenomenological and Derridean opposition between the ‘intelligible’ and the ‘sensible’ reflects a distinction between ‘theory’ (featuring systematicity, noncontradiction, and procedural recoverability) and a ‘fictivist thought’ – the processual intellectual work of creative writers. The first of these is marked by an impulse towards logical closure (and is coded to the practice of academic theorists) while the second is marked by an impulse to resist or repudiate such closure, a working ambivalence that marks (some) fictive texts. There is a formal contradiction, however, in building an intelligible discourse on the subject of the unintelligible. Angela Carter's sequence of texts (radio play, short stories, screenplay) reworking Red Riding Hood works through this contradiction intertextually to throw light on the use of ambivalence as an intellectual strategy entailing both a structuration (a reflection on ambivalence) and destructuration (the ambivalent refusal to reify ambivalence). She ac...