scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question

Showing papers in "Performance Research in 2005"



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Theatre Soundscape and the End of Noise as discussed by the authors is a collection of works about the theatre soundscape and its end of noise in the 1990s and early 2000s; see, e.g.,
Abstract: (2005). The Theatre Soundscape and the End of Noise. Performance Research: Vol. 10, On Technē, pp. 105-119.

10 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Kear, A. as mentioned in this paper 'Troublesome amateurs: Theatre, ethics and the labour of mimesis', Performance Research (2005) 10 (1), 26-46 RAE2008
Abstract: Kear, A. 'Troublesome Amateurs: Theatre, ethics and the labour of mimesis', Performance Research (2005) 10 (1), 26-46 RAE2008

10 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the concept of projection is used to focus on the spatial nature of scenography, and the authors draw on practice as research performance to explore the nature of the operation of the scenography.
Abstract: Article which draws on practice as research performance to explore the nature of the operation of scenography. Uses the concept of projection to focus on the spatial nature of scenography.

9 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the creative practices or techne of the theater technician and propose a view of the technician that reconnects the technologies of theater and the arts of theater, via the persona of the expert practitioners and the expertise in action.
Abstract: The article explores the creative practices or techne of the theater technician. The author seeks to promote and to begin to theorize a view of the technician that reconnects the technologies of theater and the arts of theater, via the persona of the expert practitioners and the expertise in action.

8 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a dialogue across the practices of philosophy and live performance is presented, where Martin Heidegger's 1955 lecture "The Question Concerning Technology" is used increasingly to problematize practiceic...
Abstract: This article is a dialogue across the practices of philosophy and live performance. Martin Heidegger's 1955 lecture 'The Question Concerning Technology' is used increasingly to problematize practic ...

5 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: One of the conditions of performance outlined by both Richard Schechner and Marvin Carlson is that the performer must be to some degree 'conscious' of playing this role as discussed by the authors, which can also be seen as a form of self-reference.
Abstract: The word 'theatre', it has often been observed, derives from the the Greek theatron, or 'place of seeing' (see Birmingham 1997: 379-96). So much for the etymology, but cannot one also be 'touched' or 'moved' seated in the auditorium? What of 'once more, with feeling, darling'? Where it has concerned itself with theatre, performance studies has often exercized a sleight of hand, which at once marginalizes 'the theatre' within a continuum of other practices and yet has also voraciously co-opted for 'performance' theatrical activity that is not immediately identified with the 'mainstream' or the 'traditional'. However, whether one supposes West End musicals to be isomorphic with ritual practice or not, theatre remains the currency of the discourse of performance, if only because the English language itself is so suffused with theatrical terms, phrases, and metaphors. Wherever one places oneself within the various debates that constitute the 'anti-discipline' of performance studies, theatre remains a nagging presence for reasons which are not only historical (see Carlson 1996) but embedded within the very language in which the debates are conducted.1 Even those English speakers who have never set foot in a theatre building or witnessed a formally presented theatrical performance have probably at some time or another 'made an entrance', 'taken on a role', 'waited in the wings' and so on, or described the actions of others in such terms. To understand these expressions within the context of contemporary language, however, is not merely to reflect on them as meta-theatrical illustrations of everyday life, but also to do those things: to embody their theatricality. One of the conditions of performance outlined by both Richard Schechner and Marvin Carlson is that the performer must be to some degree 'conscious' of playing this role. Rather than this being some convenient general state of consciousness or awareness, to feel 'as if' one's self, or somebody else, is 'playing a role', one has to have some kind of connection to the actuality of doing this. Since the publication of their groundbreaking Metaphor1; We Live By, George Lakoff and Mark Johnson have argued that metaphorical use of language is not only (or even) the abstract connection of symbolically comparable objects or events but is grounded in the experiential conditions of being 'a body' in relation to both environmental and cultural constraints, and that conscious sta~s are arrived at via this grounding. However, as Thomas Csordas has since also suggested, whilst it is important to understand how 'the body and its inherent orientations are \"taken up\" into culture, becoming the \"body in the mind\"' (1994: 20), rather than reducing experience to language, it is necessary to understand how 'language gives access to a world of experience in so far as experience comes to, or is brought to, language' (1994: n). To make use of terms like 'playing a role' can also be to engage (or at least appeal to) their embodiment. If performance studies is suffused with theatrical language to the extent

5 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The case of Shakespeare presents a particularly extreme example of the power dynamics of this world but as a special case can serve to articulate, in no uncertain terms, what is at stake in the digital world of archiving performance.
Abstract: Digital Technology has made it possible to document the movements of every actor in each rehearsal and performance of every production of Shakespeare created for the stage (the street, the church hall or the school auditorium, for that matter). But the question arises does the fact that it is possible make it a desirable thing to do? The wide availability of digital technology, combined with the end of the millennium, resulted in an explosion of activity around the question of archiving. At the dawn of the new millennium the desire to archive everything for posterity was very strong. Thankfully that seeming urgency has calmed down considerably in the ensuing years, largely because of the financial and technical hurdles involved in archiving. In fact, looking back five years with a cool eye, it is possible to see how the rush towards the digital was above all a struggle for the power of distribution. The attention of a worldwide audience offered up by the World Wide Web became the aim of every newcomer to this technology, whether a commercial company, a publicly funded institution or an individual enthusiast. The naivety and optimism with which so many of us approached this new technology is touching in retrospect. The reality, of course, was much more mundane and also a little uglier as traditional power relations and prejudices have slowly been reconfirmed in this new environment. This essay will look at the issues at stake in the digital world of archiving performance. The case of Shakespeare presents a particularly extreme example of the power dynamics of this world but as a special case can serve to articulate, in no uncertain terms, what is at stake. The position of Shakespeare within education in the United Kingdom in particular, while a long and well-fought battle, has taken on new dimensions and new champions in the digital world. At one end of the spectrum the current government has seen the history of Shakespeare in performance as a means of fulfilling its mandate to bring history and culture into every classroom in the land. At the other end of the spectrum increasingly large commercial publishers are creating increasingly large and monolithic subscriptions services that are trying to provide a new kind of intellectual authority. Between these two extremes there exists a complex range of individual producers of online materials with a wide range of motiva· tiona! and methodological positions. The underlying cultural assumptions of the positions I describe are glaring, yet few have drawn attention to these aspects of digital archiving. By taking a closer look at who is currently involved in the digital performance archiving world, I hope to draw some light towards the issues of power and authority. As a means of establishing a path for the cultural future of the country the Labour government seem to have chosen to focus on perpetuating particular visions of the country's cultural past. This is not a new political strategy, but I suggest that it is one that has taken on new dimensions

5 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors look into some examples of autonomous ('anti-globalist', social) movements in Slovenia that have attracted wide attention, including the Urad za lntervencije (The Office for Intervention), usually shortened to UZI, organized a protest in support of refugees.
Abstract: In this essay we will look into some examples of autonomous ('anti-globalist', social) movements in Slovenia that have attracted wide attention. In carrying out their political activity they made use of protests and direct actions, thereby introducing willingly or not, an 'aesthetic' dimension to their political activity. By the same token, our interest is in, conditionally speaking, 'politicized' artistic events or, if we employ a measure of caution in using the term 'art', those events that could be understood as belonging to the world of art, either because their creators are artists or because they themselves declared these events artistic (or have not objected when journalists, critics, politicians and others designated them as such); or because they use conventional artistic strategies. At the beginning of the new millennium, political activism in Slovenia gained strength. In February 2001, following some smaller actions, a group of activists who gave themselves an ironic and enigmatic name, Urad za lntervencije (The Office for Intervention), usually shortened to UZI, organized a protest in support of refugees. Among the events that followed, especially worthy of mention is a protest staged on the occasion of the meeting between Presidents Bush and Putin in Slovenia, which will be remembered for the enormous number of police officers and technical equipment engaged in securing this gathering.

4 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The air is in one sense literally the raw material of theatre; the inert, unshaped reserve of matter that is shaped into utterance as discussed by the authors, and the air is among the most important of the unacknowledged frames or material contexts for what goes on, or as they say in the North, "comes off".
Abstract: There is a venerable tradition that emphasizes the airiness of theatre; seeing actors as ghostly shades, able to be dissipated by a puff of wind, and the braggart business that transpires upon the stage as gust and bluster, so much hot air. Like Hamlet, the chameleon actor lives on air, promise-crammed (III.ii, 107). At one end of the continuum might be King Lear, in which the modulations of air participate in and are seen as a rich and varied correlative to the action, at the other end, Beckett's Breath, which stages the interval of life as a simple act of breath and thereby shows the elemental incidence of breath to the stage. I am going to suggest that the air is among the most important of the unacknowledged frames or material contexts for what goes on, or as they say in the North, 'comes off' in the theatre. Air is in one sense literally the raw material of theatre; the inert, unshaped reserve of matter that is shaped into utterance. Actors take to the air, take it up, make it move. The round and hollow '0' of the theatre, the great globe itself, may be at once a world, a throat, or a slipknot of the lips; in the framing of that 'o', and the oohs and aahs, the gales of laughter, or the boos and hisses, that are supposed to answer it from the auditorium, the air is formed into those smoke-rings that are the temporal form of performance. But something has happened, and is still happening, to the air in theatre. I will say in fact that the substance and the salience of air in theatre come to notice especially because theatre habitually evacuates the air, attempts to substitute a kind of air conditioning for the condition of air that it must always inhabit.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Acting on the Media The actor~ modell of being on lltage in an age of technological mediation as mentioned in this paper is an actor-on-the-media model that is based on the concept of cybernetics.
Abstract: 'post-industrial' from information and system theories to refer to those communities that are no longer primarily organized around the technology of the industrial machine but governed by a concept of technology as cybernetics: as a system of operational patterns that condition informational transmissions and transformations. Acting on the Media The actor~ modell of being on lltage in an age of technological mediation

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an introduction into reading of a chapter from Branko Gavella's book ACTING: a THEORY is given, which is an introduction to reading the book.
Abstract: This text is an introduction into reading of a chapter from Branko Gavella's book ACTING: a THEORY.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Means Whereby My body encountering choreography via Trisha Brown's Locu as discussed by the authors is an example of a Shakespearean actor in London who became quite famous, later moving to London and befriending educational philosopher and social activist john Dewey.
Abstract: 1869) worked as a Shakespearean actor in Melbourne, Australia. Continually subject to hoarseness, he strove to solve the problem by observing his postural patterns and experimenting with thought and action. Over years of work he developed his technique based on inhibition and conscious direction and published his first text 1910. He became quite famous, later moving to London and befriending educational philosopher and social activist john Dewey, who supported his work and encouraged him to set up a formal training program. Alexander published his fourth and final text in 1941 and died in 1955. The Means Whereby My body encountering choreography via Trisha Brown's Locu.A


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the context of contemporary performance practices and the wider cultural and political environment, the issue of form and its relation to timeto the yet-to-comeits relationship to politics, to space, to cultural environment, is perhaps no longer to be used in its more conventional association with the imposition of fixed organizational frameworks on the materials and contexts of performance, but in an active sense of processes of formation as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: An issue on form, and the issue of form itself, might seem in the context of contemporary performance practices and the wider cultural and political environment, to be retrospective, a theme consigned to a formalism associated (at least within performance arts) with the structuralism of the 1970s or the modernism of the mainstream. Yet the question of formof how, where, with and for whom performance takes place, becomes visible or manifests itself as a point of resistance or a moment of slippage or connectivityseems to be as immediate and pressing as ever. The association of the term 'form' itself however has shifted. Form and its relation to timeto the yet-to-comeits relationship to politics, to space, to cultural environment, is perhaps no longer to be used in its more conventional association with the imposition of fixed organizational frameworks on the materials and contexts of performance, but in an active sense of processes of formation, the sets of relational processes that reflect the intensities, differences, transformations and translations that constitute the work of performance.1 Such a view of 'form' is of course exemplified widely in practice across the field of contemporary performance and informed by a relational view of performance as a shared moment of becoming, an event within an always wider and more complex set of associated processes and contexts that make connections (in terms of performance) between texts, histories, political economies and psychodynamics. Such conceptualizations are reflected inter alia in the writings of Nicholas Bourriaud on relational aesthetics and the limitations of static forms. Starting with the assertion that 'art is a state of encounter' where form exists only in the dynamic relationship enjoyed by an artistic proposition with other formations, artistic or otherwise', he goes on to propose that

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the position of the reader towards a text is juxtaposed with questions of pattern and point of view, and aspects of visual production are considered syntactically, as perceived by readers and viewers.
Abstract: This article was invited for the 'On Form' issue of Performance Research, edited by Dr Ric Allsopp. It considers patterns and structures as perceived by readers and viewers. Starting from an essay by Sir Thomas Browne (1605-1682), it links discourses of close reading with visual arts theory and film studies. The position of the reader towards a text is juxtaposed with questions of pattern and point of view. Contemporary poetic writing is examined visually, and aspects of visual production are considered syntactically. This research was further developed in a performance, 'from among the smocks …'. Initially presented at Dartington (November 2005), it used digital mediation and live action to present a movement between the textual and the visual, between word and image.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors survey and examine various kinds of reception of Sellars's The Merchant of Venice and contrast them with their own retrospective assessment in order to see how they do or do not converge.
Abstract: As a dramaturg who has recently re-entered the academy after two decades of professional work in Chicago theater, I have undergone a shift of critical perspective and allegiance in my move from the theatre-based critical inquiry that Jane Ann Crum characterizes as 'the dramaturgical sensibility' (see 1996: 70-8) in which critical issues are posed during the creative process as questions for consideration and resolution by theatre artists -towards direct assertions backed by evidence. While working as dramaturg on Peter Sellars's highly controversiali994 production of The Merchant of Venice at the Goodman Theater, I was a willing and enthusiastic participant in and advocate for the productiona 'friendly critic', 1 if you willand the questions and notes I offered during that process were designed to help the director to think about the ramifications of his artistic decisions as they were reflected in my experience and the experience (as I perceived it) of the audience. Now, as a dramaturg in the academy, I can look back on the production and offer a retrospective critical assessment of Sellars's approach and what I believe were some of the ramifications of that approach. This essay, then, will survey and examine various kinds of reception of Sellars's Merchant of Venice and will contrast them with my own retrospective assessment in order to see how they do or do not converge. My involvement as production dramaturg allowed me access to an unusually rich trove of reception indicators. These include transcriptions of Sellars's own rehearsal discourse, along with extensive transcribed commentary by various demographic segments of the audience; I will reference these along with generally available sources such as press reviews and academic essays. Overall, I wish to argue that most of the controversy that swirled around the production can be traced back to a core issue: Sellars's dual theatrical/cinematic agenda. That is, Sellars made clear throughout the rehearsal process that he intended to make a film of the production once the Chicago run and subsequent tour to London, Hamburg and Paris were over. His filmic aspirations never came to fruition, and I attribute this to the controversial critical and audience reception that, ironically, I believe resulted from the many cinematic elements he injected into and experimented with in the context of his stage production. Sellars is best known for his updated productions of the Mozart!DaPonte Co.Ai Fan Tutte, The Marriage of Figaro and Don Giovanni, which appeared onstage in the late 198os and were then released on public television and video in the early 1990s. As I have detailed elsewhere, opera critics were taken aback by the live productions, which were more warmly received once they reached the small screen. Sellars's radical reinterpretations, in other words, seemed to find greater acceptance as they made their way from theater stages onto

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present an electronic, pre-publication version of an article published in Performance Research, which is available online at http://www.performanceresearch.org.
Abstract: This is an electronic, pre-publication version of an article published in Performance Research. © Copyright 2005 Taylor & Francis. Images appearing in the published version of this article have been removed.Performance Research is available online at .

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: While I have a deep admiration for today's RSC, I am inclined to suspect that such a "collective experience" is unlikely to be shared by audiences at the Albery or the Royal Shakespeare Theatre (I deliberately exclude the Swan, for reasons that will become apparent).
Abstract: While I have a deep admiration for today's RSC, I am inclined to suspect that such a 'collective experience' is unlikely to be shared by audiences at the Albery or the Royal Shakespeare Theatre (I deliberately exclude the Swan, for reasons that will become apparent). Mainstream Shakespeare today is on the whole profoundly individualized; audiences sit in darkened auditoria as a Shakespeare represent· ing psychologically detailed characters is played out before them, to a greater or lesser extent naturalistically. Much is made of Shakespeare's timelessly accurate psychological insights; Antony Sher's comments on playing Leontes for the RSC in 1999 are perhaps an indicative example:


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Unbearable Lightness of Artistic Freedom as discussed by the authors is a discussion of contemporary relations between economy, art, and politics, where the authors argue that artistic freedom has no social relevance while, at the same time, artistic subjectivity is becoming the privileged neo-liberal subjectivity.
Abstract: Maska One of the key objectives of today's debate is a consideration of contemporary relations between economy, art and politics. It seems that we live in times when artistic freedom has no social relevance while, at the same time, artistic subjectivity is becoming the privileged neo-liberal subjectivity. Creativity, autonomy and other similar trade-marks of artistic utopias of the twentieth century are becoming the driving forces of contemporary economy and capital. The recent issue of Maska entitled 'The Unbearable Lightness of Artistic Freedom'1 features two different interpretations of contemporaneity. There is Ranciere, and there is Badiou with his treatise on art two diametrically opposed approaches to the contemporary situation. 2 Ranciere argues that heterogeneity in art and politics stems from layers that are not necessarily concurrent; this entails a certain reinvention of the past and of the strategies with which we can re-establish art as an always archaeological and particular mode of formal action, as a specific dissimilarity. On the other end of the spectrum, Badiou defends a universalist position, which is also very definitive as regards current artistic production. Namely, Badiou argues that it is better to produce nothing than to contribute to the visibility of that which already exists according to Western proclamations. It seems that both positions, when they eventually tackle the question of art, offer an exhausted solution; action as well as idleness, persistence as well withdrawal, are something abstract. What we are interested in then is the following: is it possible to think the relations between art, politics and economy differently, especially as regards the history and the genealogy of space' which is our origin? What do we think about the emancipatory potential of art today and what does this mean, given the complexity of the change of the position of contemporary art, which flourishes in an intimate interrelatedness of cultural and economic production? And how do we conceive of the emancipatory potential of art and retain a critical awareness of the construction of our history, of the accumulation of examples, and of the genealogy of different spaces? Lev Kreft I would like to bring into play one of these great codified examples, Van Gogh's shoes, which of course are an example that has run through the entire twentieth century and ends with the deconstruction of this trajectory with Derrida. If we are to tackle the story again, we have to do so from a positivist perspective, which does not entail a debate about whether these shoes are from the city or from the countryside. This is the point where Shapiro3 missed an opportunity, when he appealed to Gauguin's statements from r888 regarding what was

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Quigley et al. as discussed by the authors present an installation of three medium-sized maple trees, with their burlap-wrapped root bags intact, situated at the end of a sculpted earth furrow that seems to have been dug out by the northbound scraping movement of the trees.
Abstract: As I did stand my watch upon the hill, I look'd toward Birnam, and anon, methought, The wood began to move. 2 Warren Quigley, statement from 'When 'The predictions by the apparitions in the forest moves', Toronto Sculpture Garden Shakespeare's Macbeth foretell impending monograph, 1995. doom. In our time, apocalyptic scenarios constructed by science, informed by nature, warn us of the potentiality of future events. It is foreshadowed that Macbeth's destructive ambitions and pride will come to an end only when the forest moves. An advancing army, using trees cut from a nearby forest as camouflage, moves the forest closer and closer, taking Macbeth by surprise. Historically, forests in our regions have slowly moved at 100 kilometres a century, following the receding glaciers in order to adapt. Now it is thought that by the year 2050, because of global warming, the sugar maple range could move as much as 640 kilometres north, well past the forty-ninth parallel (Piasecki and Asmus 1990: 79). Physically, this installation takes the form of three medium-sized maple trees, with their burlap-wrapped root bags intact, situated at the end of a sculpted earth furrow that seems to have been dug out by the northbound scraping movement of the trees. Contained in the furrow like a residual trail is text cast in bronze, this text, in hand-written script, consists of the story of the advancing trees in Macbeth. As much as Macbeth's downfall was a result of his arrogance, so too our own undoing may be a result of our perceived invincible intelligence, our undying faith in the all-powerful TechnoGod, and our unwillingness to see the warning signs.' Warren Quigley (1995)~

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Siddon;,/Cowley Project as discussed by the authors is an example of a work that explores aspects of the sublime in the context of performance theory, with a focus on transfiguration.
Abstract: thought' (Crowther 1993: 5). It is in this sense that I am interested both in the traces of historical aesthetic performance, and in contemporary performance as a mode of critical engagement with them. Thus, this article is dialectically coupled with a show, conducted with voice artist and dancer Isabel Jones, that together constitute the Siddon;,/Cowley Project.4 The stage we have in progress is by now familiar enough. It corresponds to Kristeva's (1984) notion of 'semiosis'the play of signifiers below the level of signification, at the site of sense's perpetual becoming, a multifarious flow of possibilities. It is a fluid place, a productive chaos or chora that (feels like it) precedes the gatherings of the logos. I aim to have and share my palimpsest, my mad map. But, as I explore below, I aim also to put that, in its turn, in dialogue with Fredric Jameson's seminal intervention on the issue of interpretationthe project of figuring historyas opposed to mere exegesis. 2 CONSTRUCTED PRESENCE, SEMIOTICS AND PHENOMENOLOGY If the stage is a place of multivocality and slippery signification, it is also the place of interplay between signification and constructed presence. I want to stress, constructed. This leads me to the second sense of 'translation' I want to address. Set within the frame of historical translation, the Project aims in particular to explore aspects of the sublime. It is an English-language pun, but a productive one for this occasion, that we speak of being 'translated' into a state of pure non-cognitive apprehension, of becoming open to the sublime, that quintessentially eighteenth-century construction. If the eighteenth-century subject open to the sublime was also said to be 'transported', then the movement was upwards. There is an w.cent to that which is beyond wordsbeyond signification and hence translation in the sense of recodification. But of course performance theory has, over the past couple of decades, engaged with that which is beyond signification, through the appropriation from philosophy of phenomenology. Phenomenology has explored fundamental and irreducible aspects of protosubjectivity and intersubjectivity, the very basics of being-in-the-world, that which underlies, precedes and conditions not only signification but also perception. In exploring that 'primitive spatiality of which experience is merely the outer covering and which merges with the body's very being' (Merleau-Ponty, cited in Garner 1994: 4), phenomenology is concerned with something inherent rather than trarucendent. Or is it? Crowther, for instance, notes the psychological effect whereby the irreducible or inherent produces a .<~erue of the transcendent. But one important frame for this essay is Adorno's scathing cN.tique in 1964 of 'the jargon of authenticity' and of Heidegger as its totem. For Adorno provides a cultural narrative for the production of such a sense. He demonstrates how attention to the irreducible 'existential' moment in human being and experience provided philosophical underpinning to a discourse and practice in Germany of reactionary petit-bourgeois self-satisfaction, the anti-dialectical bracketing off of the social from the individual. And at the heart of that was the fundamentally ae.<~thetic trope of sameness-toself: the historically withered bourgeois subject desperately shores itself up through a ritualized

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, Baudrillard's logics mediate the drift from doing to being in Auslander's book Liveneu, despite the fact that he sets out to
Abstract: RICHARD MALCOLM 1 This binary approach governs Birringer's analysis of the 'perverse' practices of Stelarc and Reza Abdoh in Media in Perfonnance, in which he asserts their 'disavowal of an organic, whole body' (see Birringer 1998: 21-4, 61). I am particularly concerned, however, by the way Baudrillard's logics mediate the drift from doing to being in Auslander's book Liveneu, despite the fact that he sets out to

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Gavella distinguishes and analyzes five degrees in the formation and evolution of the new actor's personality, each further degree containing the material and structure of all the previous ones: the private personality, technical personality, normative personality, the character (actor's and dramatic/ and the ideal personality).
Abstract: In the following selection of fragments from one of the key chapters in the book Acting: a Theory, Gavella distinguishes and analyzes five degrees in the formation and evolution of the new actor's personality, each further degree containing the material and structure of all the previous ones: the private personality, the technical personality, the normative personality, the character (actor's and dramatic/ and the ideal personality. To simplify grossly, the new personality of the actor is developed through the merging and diverging of inner psycho-physical and outer normativesimultaneously active processes, relations and contents, among which the main are: the aesthetically focused relationship with the object; the awakened organic experiential material; the folding of the inner spectator, conceived by the aesthetic experience, back on the amorphous experiential material that has to be selected, formed and controlled; fashioning of the new personal form and adoption of the socio-aesthetic normative structures as the vehicles for expressing, or rather exchanging, organic experience; the organic co-play of the actor[-spectator) and spectator[-actorl.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the problematic utopia of resistance, which has always understood resistance as 'abolition of the state and its subordination to the community', can be found in Bosnia, where we can observe direct consequences of the disintegration of State authority.
Abstract: In 1993 Slavoj Zizek wrote a text entitled 'Es Gibt Keinen Staat in Europa·. Written for the project NSK State In Time, 1 the text discusses the problematic utopia of resistance, which has always understood resistance as 'abolition of the state and its subordination to the community'. In his opinion the reality of this utopia can today be found in Bosnia, where we can observe direct consequences of the disintegration of State authority. Moreover, the reality of this utopia is not limited to ethnic chaos in Bosnia but is also a reality of hyperregulated order. As Zizek said, Bosnia is merely a metaphor for Europe as a whole.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Assassination of the Spectator by Medee Materiau as mentioned in this paper is a seminal work in the field of media and politics, focusing on the role of women in the process.
Abstract: (2005). Medee Materiau: The Assassination of the Spectator. Performance Research: Vol. 10, On Form/Yet to Come, pp. 99-110.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors explore the influence of Beckett's influence on a range of current arts practices (including music and sonic art) in order to consider the significance of formal processes, as opposed to surface features of sounding "style" in particular contemporary musical practices.
Abstract: The initial version of this paper was written for the APU Cambridge conference ‘Form and Forming in Music’, April 2000. Laws revisited the work in response to an invitation to contribute to the ‘On Form/Yet to Come’ issue of the Routledge journal, Performance Research. The interdisciplinary approach of this journal and its focus on contemporary performance practices make it an appropriate context for disseminating her work. Subsequently, she was asked to guest edit PR’s ‘On Beckett’ issue (vol. 12.1, March 2007), exploring Beckett’s influence on a range of current arts practices (including music and sonic art). ‘Aspects of Form…’ draws on recent theory and critique from other arts and cultural contexts in order to consider the significance of formal processes, as opposed to surface features of sounding ‘style’, in particular contemporary musical practices. In doing so, it questions the simplistic and uncritical equating of postmodernism with pastiche, tonality, and by implication conservatism, prevalent in much contemporary musicology. The paper is representative of a strand of research that spins off from the interdisciplinary theoretical basis of Laws’s other projects, which in part consider how different art forms have theorised Modernism and Postmodernism, especially in relation to questions of form and meaning, authority and subjectivity, conception and performance. Here, this background is applied back to the work of certain contemporary composers. At the heart of this lies a consideration of the ways in which labels can either enhance or limit understanding of artists’ approaches to their materials. This strand of Laws’s research has run alongside other work. However, once her forthcoming Beckett book is completed she will shift the main emphasis of her research into this field, collaborating with two young British composers on writings on (and in relation to) their working practices.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Wojnarowicz as discussed by the authors describes the Other World as "a place where by virtue of having been born centuries late one is denied access to earth or space, choice or movement".
Abstract: First there is the World. Then there is the Other World. The Other World is where I sometimes lose my footing. In its calendar turnings, in its pre invented existence. The barrage of twists and turns where I sometimes get weary trying to keep up with it, minute by minute adapt: the world of the stoplight, the no-smoking signs, the rental world, the split-rail fencing shielding hundreds of miles of barren wilderness from the human step. A place where by virtue of having been born centuries late one is denied access to earth or space, choice or movement. The boughtup world; the owned world. The world of coded sounds: the world of language, the world of lies. The packaged world; the world of speed in metallic motion. The Other World where I've always felt like an alien. David Wojnarowicz (1991: 87-8)