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JournalISSN: 1090-3771

Philosophy & Geography 

Taylor & Francis
About: Philosophy & Geography is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Independence & Pragmatism. It has an ISSN identifier of 1090-3771. Over the lifetime, 95 publications have been published receiving 1095 citations. The journal is also known as: philosophy (general) & Philosophy.

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article argued that the vagueness exhibited by geographic names and descriptions is ultimately ontological: these terms are vague because they refer to vague objects, objects with fuzzy boundaries, and when we say ''Everest'' we are just being vague as to which thing we are referring to.
Abstract: Some have argued that the vagueness exhibited by geographic names and descriptions such as ''Albuquerque,'' ''the Outback,'' or ''Mount Everest'' is ultimately ontological: these terms are vague because they refer to vague objects , objects with fuzzy boundaries. I take the opposite stand and hold the view that geographic vagueness is exclusively semantic, or conceptual at large. There is no such thing as a vague mountain. Rather, there are many things where we conceive a mountain to be, each with its precise boundary, and when we say ''Everest'' we are just being vague as to which thing we are referring to. This paper defends this view against some plausible objections.

113 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines the political and ethical problems which arise in the course of undertaking participatory research in developing countries and argues that, rather than supplanting relationships of power within the knowledge-generating process, most participatory researches actually strengthen them.
Abstract: This paper examines the political and ethical problems which arise in the course of undertaking participatory research in developing countries. It argues that, rather than supplanting relationships of power within the knowledge creating process, most participatory research actually strengthens them. Instead a more complete form of dialogic research is required, which will involve struggles within our academies as well as in those other organisations in which our research is situated.

85 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper argued that social space is not merely the consequent of the division of the world into social categories, but it is constitutive of social categories and that attempts to transform social categories must involve the transformation of social space.
Abstract: Recent discussions of human categories have suffered from an over emphasis on intention and language, and have not paid enough attention to the role of material conditions, and, specifically, of social space in the construction of human categories. The relationship between human categories and social spaces is vital, especially with the categories of class, race, and gender. This paper argues that social space is not merely the consequent of the division of the world into social categories; it is constitutive of social categories. To put it more bluntly, if who we are is bound up with place, then not only do we inhabit a divided America; divided America inhabits us. The second, and equally dramatic, conclusion is that attempts to transform social categories must involve the transformation of social space. When we sort people by categories, we do so spatially: with race come racialized spaces. And because our place comes to inhabit us, when we divide spatially we cannot help but to inscribe and produce cat...

68 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Despite the fact that wind turbines are in most respects environmentally benign, electricity-generating wind turbines frequently encounter a great deal of resistance as discussed by the authors, and much of this resistance is aesthetic in character; wind turbines somehow do not "fit" in the landscape.
Abstract: Despite the fact that they are in most respects environmentally benign, electricity-generating wind turbines frequently encounter a great deal of resistance. Much of this resistance is aesthetic in character; wind turbines somehow do not "fit" in the landscape. On one (classical) view, landscapes are beautiful to the extent that they are "scenic," well-balanced compositions. But wind turbines introduce a discordant note, they are out of "scale." On another (ecological) view, landscapes are beautiful if their various elements form a stable and integrated organic whole. But wind turbines are difficult to integrate into the biotic community; at least in certain respects, they are like "weeds." Moreover, there is a reason why the 100-meter, three bladed wind turbines now favored by the industry cannot very well be accommodated to any landscape view. They are, as Albert Borgmann would put it, characteristic of contemporary technology, distanced "devices" for the production of a commodity rather than "things" w...

62 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Iain Hay1
TL;DR: The authors argue that ethical theory, practical problems, and lessons learned from postmodern thought make the prospect of establishing prescriptive codes of ethics unlikely, and suggest that flexible prompts for moral contemplation might be used to encourage careful thought on matters of ethics.
Abstract: This paper exhorts geographers to become more active in debate about ethical research practice. It also suggests that ethical theory, practical problems, and lessons learned from postmodern thought make the prospects of establishing prescriptive codes of ethics unlikely. Instead, flexible prompts for moral contemplation might be used to encourage careful thought on matters of ethics. Because the practical feasibility of moral prompts rests on the existence of moral imaginations, it is vital to consider ways in which those imaginations might be stimulated and nurtured. Professional associations and university academics have significant roles to play in this. Geographers must position themselves as effective agents in the processes by which professional research ethics are shaped rather than awaiting the potentially inappropriate outcomes of other agencies ‘ deliberations.

57 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
200417
200319
200214
200115
200016
199912