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Showing papers in "Philosophy & Geography in 2000"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper used diary commentaries from different individuals in the research team to present self-reflexive accounts of the ethical complexities and dilemmas encountered in offering explanations of the validity of the research, in carrying out ethnographic encounters with homeless people and in producing and evaluating the outputs of research.
Abstract: This paper reflects on ethical issues raised in research with homeless people in rural areas. It argues that the significant embracing of dialogic and reflexive approaches to social research is likely to render standard approaches to ethical research practice increasingly complex and open to negotiation. Diary commentaries from different individuals in the research team are used to present self‐reflexive accounts of the ethical complexities and dilemmas encountered in offering explanations of the validity of the research, in carrying out ethnographic encounters with homeless people and in producing and evaluating the outputs of research. Reflexivity does not dissolve ethical tensions, but opens up possibilities for new ethical and moral maps with which to explore ethical terrains more appropriately and more honestly.

21 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss disability, geography, and ethics in the context of philosophy and geography, and propose a framework for disability-awareness in philosophy and geography, respectively.
Abstract: (2000). Disability, Geography and Ethics. Philosophy & Geography: Vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 98-102.

15 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the management of human relationships is understood as an unfolding cycle of choice among tragic choices and management of the non-human environment is accomplished through the realisation of the gift relationship.
Abstract: Resource development takes place through the transformation of social institutions. The moral dimension is of crucial importance in the evolution of associated management regimes. More than just a code of ethics, moralities are predicated on what is understood to be ‘the good’. Recognition of the good requires a rhetoric beyond those of power and interest. This paper proposes a rhetoric of love. Within this conception of morality, the management of human relationships becomes understood as an unfolding cycle of choice among tragic choices and management of the non‐human environment is accomplished through the realisation of the gift relationship.

12 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the theme of ethics and moral philosophy is explicitly examined in relation to geographies of social exclusion and the lives of disabled individuals, as a research practice and institutional endeavour.
Abstract: In recent years geographers have started to re-engage with issues of exclusion, social justice and moral philosophy, first explored by radical geographers in the 1970s. This re-engagement parallels the rapid growth in the 1990s of feminist and critical geographies. Geographers within these traditions have focused their attention on the intersection of issues such as identity, difference and space, and the ways in which socio-spatial processes reproduce material and non-material inequalities. Empirical and theoretical work has focused on a range of specific issues such as gender (patriarchy), race (racism), sexuality (homophobia) and class. To this list has recently been added disability (ableism). However, most critical geography research has concentrated on examining the production and maintenance of geographies of social exclusion. Only a small number of studies have engaged directly with these issues in the context of specific theories of social justice and moral philosophy, which are seemingly taken for granted (see Smith, 1994, 1997). One area where these ideas have been applied is in relation to data generation, where there has been a concern for research ethics and the power relationship between researcher and researched. For example, a number of articles have been published exploring issues such as production and situatedness of knowledge, representativeness, reflexivity, empowerment, emancipation, critical praxis and positionality, and how these might be best addressed (e.g. Katz, 1992; Robinson, 1994; Rose, 1997). In the collection of short position papers gathered here, the theme of ethics and moral philosophy is explicitly examined in relation to geography (as a research practice and institutional endeavour) and the lives of disabled people.

11 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a set of moral and rational principles are used to identify the intrinsic value of a given species and for comparing it to that of other species, in order to determine which species are holders of rights.
Abstract: Environmental ethics is generally searching for the intrinsic value in natural beings. However, there are very few holistic models trying to reflect the various dimensions of the experience-to-be a natural being. We are searching for that intrinsic value, in order to determine which species are holders of rights. In this article, I suggest a set of moral and rational principles to be used for identifying the intrinsic value of a given species and for comparing it to that of other species.

8 citations


Journal ArticleDOI

7 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, disability, geography and ethics are discussed in the context of philosophy and geography, with a focus on the disability and its relationship with philosophy and geography, respectively.
Abstract: (2000). Disability, Geography and Ethics. Philosophy & Geography: Vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 70-80.

6 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, disability, Geography and Ethics Philosophy & Geography: Vol 3, No 1, pp 80-87, and Ethics and Philosophy: Vol 2, No 2, pp 81-87
Abstract: (2000) Disability, Geography and Ethics Philosophy & Geography: Vol 3, No 1, pp 80-87

5 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Moral reflections: David Harvey's justice, nature and the geography of difference as discussed by the authors, is a good starting point for this paper. 468 pp., paper/cloth, $25.95/$68.95.
Abstract: Moral reflections: David Harvey's justice, nature and the geography of difference. Malden, MA and Oxford: Blackwell, 1996. 468 pp., paper/cloth, $25.95/$68.95, ISBN 1–55786–681–3/1–55786–680–5

1 citations






Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, disability, geography and ethics are discussed in the context of philosophy and geography, with a focus on the disability and its relationship with philosophy and geography, respectively.
Abstract: (2000). Disability, Geography and Ethics. Philosophy & Geography: Vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 87-90.