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JournalISSN: 0032-0935

Planta 

About: Planta is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Ecology (disciplines) & Arabidopsis. It has an ISSN identifier of 0032-0935. Over the lifetime, 15493 publication(s) have been published receiving 686124 citation(s).
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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Jun 1980-Planta
TL;DR: Various aspects of the biochemistry of photosynthetic carbon assimilation in C3 plants are integrated into a form compatible with studies of gas exchange in leaves.
Abstract: Various aspects of the biochemistry of photosynthetic carbon assimilation in C3 plants are integrated into a form compatible with studies of gas exchange in leaves. These aspects include the kinetic properties of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase; the requirements of the photosynthetic carbon reduction and photorespiratory carbon oxidation cycles for reduced pyridine nucleotides; the dependence of electron transport on photon flux and the presence of a temperature dependent upper limit to electron transport. The measurements of gas exchange with which the model outputs may be compared include those of the temperature and partial pressure of CO2(p(CO2)) dependencies of quantum yield, the variation of compensation point with temperature and partial pressure of O2(p(O2)), the dependence of net CO2 assimilation rate on p(CO2) and irradiance, and the influence of p(CO2) and irradiance on the temperature dependence of assimilation rate.

6,634 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
30 Apr 1997-Planta
TL;DR: It is shown here for the first time that the interdependence between surface roughness, reduced particle adhesion and water repellency is the keystone in the self-cleaning mechanism of many biological surfaces.
Abstract: The microrelief of plant surfaces, mainly caused by epicuticular wax crystalloids, serves different purposes and often causes effective water repellency. Furthermore, the adhesion of contaminating particles is reduced. Based on experimental data carried out on microscopically smooth (Fagus sylvatica L., Gnetum gnemon L., Heliconia densiflora Verlot, Magnolia grandiflora L.) and rough water-repellent plants (Brassica oleracea L., Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott., Mutisia decurrens Cav., Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.), it is shown here for the first time that the interdependence between surface roughness, reduced particle adhesion and water repellency is the keystone in the self-cleaning mechanism of many biological surfaces. The plants were artificially contaminated with various particles and subsequently subjected to artificial rinsing by sprinkler or fog generator. In the case of water-repellent leaves, the particles were removed completely by water droplets that rolled off the surfaces independent of their chemical nature or size. The leaves of N. nucifera afford an impressive demonstration of this effect, which is, therefore, called the “Lotus-Effect” and which may be of great biological and technological importance.

5,248 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
S. von Caemmerer1, Graham D. Farquhar1Institutions (1)
01 Dec 1981-Planta
TL;DR: It was found that the response of the rate of CO2 Assimilation to irradiance, partial pressure of O2, p(O2), and temperature was different at low and high intercellular p(CO2), suggesting that CO2 assimilation rate is governed by different processes at lowand high inter cellular p (CO2).
Abstract: A series of experiments is presented investigating short term and long term changes of the nature of the response of rate of CO2 assimilation to intercellular p(CO2). The relationships between CO2 assimilation rate and biochemical components of leaf photosynthesis, such as ribulose-bisphosphate (RuP2) carboxylase-oxygenase activity and electron transport capacity are examined and related to current theory of CO2 assimilation in leaves of C3 species. It was found that the response of the rate of CO2 assimilation to irradiance, partial pressure of O2, p(O2), and temperature was different at low and high intercellular p(CO2), suggesting that CO2 assimilation rate is governed by different processes at low and high intercellular p(CO2). In longer term changes in CO2 assimilation rate, induced by different growth conditions, the initial slope of the response of CO2 assimilation rate to intercellular p(CO2) could be correlated to in vitro measurements of RuP2 carboxylase activity. Also, CO2 assimilation rate at high p(CO2) could be correlated to in vitro measurements of electron transport rate. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that CO2 assimilation rate is limited by the RuP2 saturated rate of the RuP2 carboxylase-oxygenase at low intercellular p(CO2) and by the rate allowed by RuP2 regeneration capacity at high intercellular p(CO2).

4,204 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Wangxia Wang1, Basia Vinocur1, Arie Altman1Institutions (1)
26 Sep 2003-Planta
TL;DR: The present review summarizes the recent advances in elucidating stress-response mechanisms and their biotechnological applications and examines the following aspects: regulatory controls, metabolite engineering, ion transport, antioxidants and detoxification, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) and heat-shock proteins.
Abstract: Abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity, extreme temperatures, chemical toxicity and oxidative stress are serious threats to agriculture and the natural status of the environment. Increased salinization of arable land is expected to have devastating global effects, resulting in 30% land loss within the next 25 years, and up to 50% by the year 2050. Therefore, breeding for drought and salinity stress tolerance in crop plants (for food supply) and in forest trees (a central component of the global ecosystem) should be given high research priority in plant biotechnology programs. Molecular control mechanisms for abiotic stress tolerance are based on the activation and regulation of specific stress-related genes. These genes are involved in the whole sequence of stress responses, such as signaling, transcriptional control, protection of membranes and proteins, and free-radical and toxic-compound scavenging. Recently, research into the molecular mechanisms of stress responses has started to bear fruit and, in parallel, genetic modification of stress tolerance has also shown promising results that may ultimately apply to agriculturally and ecologically important plants. The present review summarizes the recent advances in elucidating stress-response mechanisms and their biotechnological applications. Emphasis is placed on transgenic plants that have been engineered based on different stress-response mechanisms. The review examines the following aspects: regulatory controls, metabolite engineering, ion transport, antioxidants and detoxification, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) and heat-shock proteins.

2,891 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
17 Feb 1999-Planta
Abstract: The occurrence of malondialdehyde (MDA), a secondary end product of the oxidation of polyunsatu- rated fatty acids, is considered a useful index of general lipid peroxidation A common method for measuring MDA, referred to as the thiobarbituric acid-reactive- substances (TBARS) assay, is to react it with thiobar- bituric acid (TBA) and record the absorbance at 532 nm However, many plants contain interfering compounds that also absorb at 532 nm, leading to overestimation of MDA values Extracts of plant tissues including purple eggplant (Solanum melongena L) fruit, carrot (Daucus carota L) roots, and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L) leaves were assessed for the presence of MDA and other non-MDA compounds absorbing at 532 nm A method described herein corrects for these interferences by subtracting the absorbance at 532 nm of a solution containing plant extract incubated without TBA from an identical solution containing TBA The reliability and eAciency of this spectrophotometric method was assessed by altering the relative ratios of exogenous MDA additions and/or extracts of red cabbage (Brassica oleracea L) leaves containing inter- fering compounds and then measuring MDA recovery Reliability was also validated through high-performance liquid chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques Results indicated that over 90% of exogenously added MDA could be recovered through the improved protocol If there were no corrections for interfering compounds, MDA equivalents were overestimated by up to 965% Interfering compounds were not detected in vegetables such as lettuce (Lactuca sativa L) and spinach which had low or negligible concentrations of anthocyanidin derivatives Comparisons between the TBARS method presented here and two currently accepted protocols indicated that the new modified method exhibits greater accuracy for quantifying TBA-MDA levels in tissues containing anthocyanins and/or other interfering com- pounds This modified protocol represents a facile and rapid method for assessment of lipid peroxidation in virtually all plant species that contain interfering com- pounds

2,566 citations


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No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202211
2021269
2020237
2019299
2018227
2017206