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JournalISSN: 0090-5224

Poe Studies 

Wiley
About: Poe Studies is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Portrait & Poetry. Over the lifetime, 255 publications have been published receiving 659 citations.
Topics: Portrait, Poetry, Narrative, Black cat, Hoax


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Poe's fiction includes a remarkable number of such identificatory moments, raising questions about the range of thoughts or sentiments that can arise in a man's mind or heart under such intense conditions as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: “When I wish to find out how wise, or how stupid, or how good, or how wicked is any one, or what are his thoughts at the moment,” C. Auguste Dupin explains in “The Purloined Letter” (1845), “I fashion the expression of my face, as accurately as possible, in accordance with the expression of his, and then wait to see what thoughts or sentiments arise in my mind or heart, as if to match or correspond with the expression” (Works, 3:984–85).1 This example of mimicry—of a man making himself “correspond” intellectually and emotionally with another man—can offer an interesting point of entry for studying connections between male relationships and the play of desire in Poe’s fiction. The possibility of a physical identification so potent that a telepathic communication of thoughts and feelings occurs between two men invites interpretation from a gay or queer perspective. Poe’s fiction includes a remarkable number of such identificatory moments, raising questions about the range of thoughts or sentiments that can arise in a man’s mind or heart under such intense conditions. To what extent can those thoughts and sentiments be understood according to homoerotic structures of desire and response? Analyzing Poe’s representation of male-male intimacy can also tell us a great deal about the nineteenth-century imaginary—about the forms that intense male relationships could take before “homosexuality” became a set of behaviors and a state of being. Jonathan Ned Katz has catalogued many examples of “sex between men” long before “homosexuality” entered the American lexicon.2 None other than Rufus Griswold, Poe’s notorious literary executor, noted the “horrible sin not to be mentioned among Christians” in his review of Whitman’s 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass.3 Robert K. Martin has also observed that from the 1840s to the 1880s, a “range of possibilities” for male-to-male relationships existed that “could run from boyhood ‘chums’ to an idealized comradeship of ‘knights-errant’ to an anguished and guilt-ridden projection of the self onto figures of Gothic evil.”4 The “figures of Gothic evil” that occupy one end of Martin’s spectrum resemble the male characters in the tales that concern me here, and their origin as “guilt-ridden projections” seems consonant with the male psychology Poe represents. Keeping in mind Katz’s

18 citations

Journal ArticleDOI

16 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A continuation of the International Poe Bibliography, supplementing the 1998-2000 installment published in Poe Studia/Dank Romanticism 35 (2003) : 38-65, first recovers entries for 1994-1997 and then provides an annotated listing for 2001-2003.
Abstract: This continuation of the \"International Poe Bibliography,\" supplementing the 1998-2000 installment published in Poe Studia/Dank Romanticism 35 (2003) : 38-65, first recovers entries for 1994-1997 and then provides an annotated listing for 2001-2003. It was compiled by a committee headed by Susan Amper of Bronx Community College/CUNY. Committee members included Roberto Cagliero, Roger Forclaz, Nathanael Gilbert, Sandra Hughes, Henri Justin, Christopher McGunnigle, RenC van Slooten, Becky Wagenblast, and Ikesue Yoko.

14 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
20198
20188
20179
20166
20157
20146