scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
JournalISSN: 1043-9463

Policing & Society 

Taylor & Francis
About: Policing & Society is an academic journal published by Taylor & Francis. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Police science & Law enforcement. It has an ISSN identifier of 1043-9463. Over the lifetime, 1185 publications have been published receiving 26500 citations. The journal is also known as: Policing and society.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
Trevor Jones1
TL;DR: The politics of the police, 4th ed., by Robert Reiner, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2010, 336 pp., £25.99 (paperback), ISBN 978-0-19-928339-2 Even prior to the outbreak of serious rioting acros...
Abstract: The politics of the police, 4th ed., by Robert Reiner, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2010, 336 pp., £25.99 (paperback), ISBN 978-0-19-928339-2 Even prior to the outbreak of serious rioting acros...

670 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examined the impact of personal experience on popular assessments of the quality of police service and found that having a bad experience is four to fourteen times as great as having a positive experience, and the coefficients associated with havi...
Abstract: This article examines the impact of personal experience on popular assessments of the quality of police service. Following past research, it addresses the influence of personal and neighbourhood factors on confidence in the police. It then focuses on the additional impact of positive and negative personal experiences with the police. Several studies of police encounters with the public have noted that the relationship between how people recall being treated and their general confidence in the police may be asymmetrical. At its worst, the police may get essentially no credit for delivering professional service, while bad experiences can deeply influence peoples’ views of their performance and even legitimacy. This proposition is tested using survey data on police-initiated and citizen-initiated contacts with police in Chicago. The findings indicate that the impact of having a bad experience is four to fourteen times as great as that of having a positive experience, and the coefficients associated with havi...

577 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors draw upon ethnographic research conducted in an English police force to explore how much of the classic characteristics of police culture have survived the period of transition, and argue that police culture endures because the basic pressures associated with the police role have not been removed.
Abstract: Understandings of police culture rely heavily on ethnographies conducted several decades ago. In these classic accounts, authors have identified recurring themes within police dispositions and practices over time and space. There have, however, been important developments within policing contexts, some of which could be expected to transform the cultural ethos that has long underpinned the police identity. This article draws upon ethnographic research conducted in an English police force to explore how much of the classic characteristics of police culture have survived the period of transition. It shows that the underlying world view of officers displays remarkable continuity with older patterns, and argues that police culture endures because the basic pressures associated with the police role have not been removed. In light of this apparent durability of cultural themes, the article calls into question the increasingly accepted view that orthodox conceptions of police culture no longer make any sense.

435 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article found that unsatisfactory contacts are associated with less favourable opinions about police effectiveness, fairness, and engagement with the community, while positively received contacts can improve perceptions of fairness and community engagement.
Abstract: Public confidence in policing has become an important issue in the UK. The police rely on legitimacy and public support, and initiatives to improve levels of confidence are currently underway. The point of contact between citizens and officers is vital in any such endeavour. But how are encounters judged and how important for public confidence are assessments of the quality of contacts? We draw upon data from the 2005/2006 Metropolitan Police Public Attitudes Survey to answer these questions. We test Skogan's (2006) finding that personal contact has a largely negative impact on confidence; we demonstrate that unsatisfactory contacts are indeed associated with less favourable opinions about police effectiveness, fairness and engagement with the community. Yet consistent with the procedural justice model we also show that positively received contacts can improve perceptions of fairness and community engagement. Moreover, seeing regular police patrols and feeling informed about police activities are associat...

414 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper explored the role of procedural justice in shaping the public's willingness to assist police in crime control and found that those who view the police as more legitimate are more likely to assist the police to control crime.
Abstract: This paper explores how to increase public cooperation and support for police. To date, only a few studies have attempted to explore the role that procedural justice plays in shaping the public's willingness to assist police in crime control. The present study explores this much neglected field of research using both crosssectional survey data and panel data. The study finds that views about police legitimacy do influence public cooperation with the police, and that those who view the police as more legitimate are more likely to assist police to control crime. The key antecedent of legitimacy is procedural justice; those who are more likely to believe police use procedural justice in their dealings with the public are more likely to perceive police as legitimate.

311 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202339
202252
2021120
202081
201975
201887