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JournalISSN: 0199-0039

Population and Environment 

Springer Science+Business Media
About: Population and Environment is an academic journal published by Springer Science+Business Media. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Population & Population growth. It has an ISSN identifier of 0199-0039. Over the lifetime, 1023 publications have been published receiving 32508 citations. The journal is also known as: Population & Environment.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors found that women express slightly greater concern about climate change than do men, and this gender divide is not accounted for by differences in key values and beliefs or in the social roles that men and women differentially perform in society.
Abstract: This study tests theoretical arguments about gender differences in scientific knowledge and environmental concern using 8 years of Gallup data on climate change knowledge and concern in the US general public. Contrary to expectations from scientific literacy research, women convey greater assessed scientific knowledge of climate change than do men. Consistent with much existing sociology of science research, women underestimate their climate change knowledge more than do men. Also, women express slightly greater concern about climate change than do men, and this gender divide is not accounted for by differences in key values and beliefs or in the social roles that men and women differentially perform in society. Modest yet enduring gender differences on climate change knowledge and concern within the US general public suggest several avenues for future research, which are explored in the conclusion.

639 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examined the impact of demographic factors on a pollutant other than carbon dioxide at the cross-national level and found that a higher urbanization rate and lower average household size increase emissions.
Abstract: This study adds to the emerging literature examining empirically the link between population size, other demographic factors and pollution. We contribute by using more reliable estimation techniques and examine two air pollutants. By considering sulfur dioxide, we become the first study to explicitly examine the impact of demographic factors on a pollutant other than carbon dioxide at the cross-national level. We also take into account the urbanization rate and the average household size neglected by many prior cross-national econometric studies. For carbon dioxide emissions we find evidence that population increases are matched by proportional increases in emissions while a higher urbanization rate and lower average household size increase emissions. For sulfur dioxide emissions, we find a U-shaped relationship, with the population-emissions elasticity rising at higher population levels. Urbanization and average household size are not found to be significant determinants of sulfur dioxide emissions. For both pollutants, our results suggest that an increasing share of global emissions will be accounted for by developing countries. Implications for the environmental Kuznets curve literature are described and directions for further work identified.

512 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors assesses the capital stocks, physical flows, and corresponding ecosystems areas required to support the economy using "ecological footprint" analysis and show that most so-called "advanced" countries are running massive unaccounted ecological deficits with the rest of the planet.
Abstract: Conventional wisdom suggests that because of technology and trade, human carrying capacity is infinitely expandable and therefore virtually irrelevant to demography and development planning. By contrast, this article argues that ecological carrying capacity remains the fundamental basis for demographic accounting. A fundamental question for ecological economics is whether remaining stocks of natural capital are adequate to sustain the anticipated load of the human economy into the next century. Since mainstream (neoclassical) models are blind to ecological structure and function, they cannot even properly address this question. The present article therefore assesses the capital stocks, physical flows, and corresponding ecosystems areas required to support the economy using “ecological footprint” analysis. This approach shows that most so-called “advanced” countries are running massive unaccounted ecological deficits with the rest of the planet. Since not all countries can be net importers of carrying capacity, the material standards of the wealthy cannot be extended sustainably to even the present world population using prevailing technology. In this light, sustainability may well depend on such measures as greater emphasis on equity in international relationships, significant adjustments to prevailing terms of trade, increasing regional self-reliance, and policies to stimulate a massive increase in the material and energy efficiency of economic activity.

454 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Using event history analyses, this paper investigated the impact of rainfall conditions on the risk of the first village departure in Burkina Faso and found that people from drier regions are more likely than those from wetter areas to engage in both temporary and permanent migrations to other rural areas.
Abstract: Using event history analyses, we investigate the impact of rainfall conditions - a crucial environmental factor in the livelihood of Sahelian households - on the risk of the first village departure in Burkina Faso The distinction of migrations by destination and duration proves critical in studying this relationship Findings suggest that people from the drier regions are more likely than those from wetter areas to engage in both temporary and permanent migrations to other rural areas Also, short-term rainfall deficits tend to increase the risk of long-term migration to rural areas and decrease the risk of short-term moves to distant destinations

407 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202314
202220
202132
202026
201923
201821