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JournalISSN: 0309-1325

Progress in Human Geography 

SAGE Publishing
About: Progress in Human Geography is an academic journal published by SAGE Publishing. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Human geography & Historical geography. It has an ISSN identifier of 0309-1325. Over the lifetime, 2567 publications have been published receiving 163851 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a distinction is made between the learning processes taking place among actors embedded in a community by just being there dubbed buzz and the knowledge attained by investing in building channels of communication called pipelines to selected providers located outside the local milieu.
Abstract: The paper is concerned with spatial clustering of economic activity and its relation to the spatiality of knowledge creation in interactive learning processes. It questions the view that tacit knowledge transfer is confined to local milieus whereas codified knowledge may roam the globe almost frictionlessly. The paper highlights the conditions under which both tacit and codified knowledge can be exchanged locally and globally. A distinction is made between, on the one hand, the learning processes taking place among actors embedded in a community by just being there dubbed buzz and, on the other, the knowledge attained by investing in building channels of communication called pipelines to selected providers located outside the local milieu. It is argued that the co-existence of high levels of buzz and many pipelines may provide firms located in outward-looking and lively clusters with a string of particular advantages not available to outsiders. Finally, some policy implications, stemming from this argumen...

3,942 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors define social resilience as the ability of groups or communities to cope with external stresses and disturbances as a result of social, political and environmental change, and explore potential links between social resilience and ecological resilience.
Abstract: This article defines social resilience as the ability of groups or communities to cope with external stresses and disturbances as a result of social, political and environmental change. This definition highlights social resilience in relation to the concept of ecological resilience which is a characteristic of ecosystems to maintain themselves in the face of disturbance. There is a clear link between social and ecological resilience, particularly for social groups or communities that are dependent on ecological and environmental resources for their livelihoods. But it is not clear whether resilient ecosystems enable resilient communities in such situations. This article examines whether resilience is a useful characteristic for describing the social and economic situation of social groups and explores potential links between social resilience and ecological resilience. The origins of this interdisciplinary study in human ecology, ecological economics and rural sociology are reviewed, and a study of the impacts of ecological change on a resource- dependent community in contemporary coastal Vietnam in terms of the resilience of its institu- tions is outlined. I Introduction The concept of resilience is widely used in ecology but its meaning and measurement are contested. This article argues that it is important to learn from this debate and to explore social resilience, both as an analogy of how societies work, drawing on the ecological concept, and through exploring the direct relationship between the two phenomena of social and ecological resilience. Social resilience is an important component of the circumstances under which individuals and social groups adapt to environmental change. Ecological and social resilience may be linked through the dependence on ecosystems of communities and their economic activities. The question is, then, whether societies dependent on resources and ecosystems are themselves less resilient. In addition, this analysis allows consideration of whether institutions

3,732 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors address the discussion, particularly prominent among feminist geographers, of reflexivity as a strategy for marking geographical knowledges as situated and argue that, if the aim of...
Abstract: This article addresses the discussion, particularly prominent among feminist geographers, of reflexivity as a strategy for marking geographical knowledges as situated. It argues that, if the aim of...

2,100 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For over 50 years, hazards researchers have focused on a series of fundamental questions: What is the human occupancy of hazard zones? How do people and societies respond to environmental hazards and whatfactors influence their choice of adjustments?.
Abstract: For over 50 years, hazards researchers have focused on a series of fundamental questions:• What is the human occupancy of hazard zones? • How do people and societies respond to environmental hazards and whatfactors influence their choice of adjustments? • How do you mitigate the risk and impact of environmental hazards?

1,967 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A review of the important literature on scale construction can be found in this paper, where the authors argue for enlarging the scope for understanding scale to include the complex processes of social reproduction and consumption.
Abstract: Over the last ten years, scholars in human geography have been paying increasing theoretical and empirical attention to understanding the ways in which the production of scale is implicated in the production of space. Overwhelmingly, this work reflects a social constructionist approach, which situates capitalist production (and the role of the state, capital, labor and nonstate political actors) as of central concern. What is missing from this discussion about the social construction of scale is serious attention to the relevance of social reproduction and consumption. In this article I review the important literature on scale construction and argue for enlarging our scope for understanding scale to include the complex processes of social reproduction and consumption. I base my critique on a short case study which illustrates that attention to other processes besides production and other systems of domination besides capitalism can enhance our theorizing and improve our attempts to effect real social change.

1,535 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202335
202263
2021117
202067
201967
201867