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JournalISSN: 1935-8644

Race \/ Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts 

Indiana University Press
About: Race \/ Ethnicity: Multidisciplinary Global Contexts is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Ethnic group & Immigration. Over the lifetime, 76 publications have been published receiving 2337 citations.

Papers published on a yearly basis

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Journal Article
TL;DR: Social forces atwork there havealsostructuredriskformostformsof extremesuffering, fromhungertotortureandrape, and,indeed, mostotherinfectiousandparasiticdiseases.
Abstract: veryone knows that suffering exists. The question is howtodefineit.Giventhateachperson’spainhasa degreeofrealityforhimorherthatthepainofothers cansurelyneverapproach,iswidespreadagreementonthesub jectpossible?Almostallofuswouldagreethatprematureand painfulillness,torture,andrapeconstituteextremesuffering. Mostwouldalsoagreethatinsidiousassaultsondignity,suchas institutionalizedracismandsexism,alsocausegreatandunjust injury. Givenourconsensusonsomeofthemoreconspicuousforms ofsuffering,anumberofcorollaryquestionscometothefore. Canweidentifythosemostatriskofgreatsuffering?Among those whose suffering is not mortal, is it possible to identify thosemostlikelytosustainpermanentanddisablingdamage? Arecertain“event”assaults,suchastortureorrape,morelikely toleadtolatesequelaethanaresustainedandinsidioussuffer ing,suchasthepainbornofdeeppovertyorofracism?Under thislatterrubric,arecertainformsofdiscriminationdemonstra blymorenoxiousthanothers? Anthropologistswhotaketheseasresearchquestionsstudy bothindividualexperienceandthelargersocialmatrixinwhich it is embedded in order to see how various large-scale social forcescometobetranslatedintopersonaldistressanddisease. Bywhatmechanismsdosocialforcesrangingfrompovertyto racismbecomeembodied asindividualexperience?Thishasbeen thefocusofmostofmyownresearchinHaiti,wherepolitical andeconomicforceshavestructuredriskforAIDS,tuberculosis, and,indeed,mostotherinfectiousandparasiticdiseases.Social forcesatworktherehavealsostructuredriskformostformsof extremesuffering,fromhungertotortureandrape.

657 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe a strict spatial partitioning of the town and its outlying districts, a prohibition to leave the town on pain of death, the killing of all stray animals, and the division of a town into distinct quarters, each governed by an intendant.
Abstract: TP he following, according to an order published at the I end of the seventeenth century, were the measures to JL be taken when the plague appeared in a town.1 First, a strict spatial partitioning: the closing of the town and its outlying districts, a prohibition to leave the town on pain of death, the killing of all stray animals; the division of the town into distinct quarters, each governed by an intendant. Each street is placed under the authority of a syndic, who keeps it under surveillance; if he leaves the street, he will be con demned to death. On the appointed day, everyone is ordered to stay indoors: it is forbidden to leave on pain of death. The syn dic himself comes to lock the door of each house from the out

577 citations

Journal Article
TL;DR: In this article, the authors express the solidarity they still feel with those who fled to the far side of the world and who will never see them again by sending their greetings.
Abstract: Letters bring the low voices across the sea. The unfa miliar pens grope for the proper words. When you ask somebody to write for you, you must go and treat him. Therefore you try yourself. In the store are printed forms. Sometimes they will do to transmit information. But you wish through this lifeless paper to do more than send news. With painful effort and at the sacrifice of precious time, you express the solidarity you still feel with those who stayed behind. The sheet is then the symbol of the ties that continue to bind. Ceremonial salutations, to my dearest ... to every him and her who filled the days of the old life and whom I will never see again. By this letter I kiss you. To the aged parents who bred and nurtured, who took trouble over, shed tears for me and now have none to comfort them; to the brother who shared my tasks and bed; to my comrades of the fields; to all the kin who joined in festivals; to the whole visible communion, the oneness, of the village that I have forfeited by emigration; to each I send my greetings. And with my greetings go wishes that you may have the sweet years of life, of health and happi ness, alas elusive there and here. They are wanderers to the wide world and often yearn to ward the far direction whence they have come. Why even the birds who fly away from their native places still hasten to go back. Can ever a man feel really happy condemned to live away from where he was born? Though by leaving he has cut himself off and knows he never will return, yet he hopes, by reaching backward, still to belong in the homeland. It is to that end that the husband and wife and older chil dren gather to assist in the composition; it is to that end that they assemble to read the reply. Little enough occurs to them that is worth recording, certainly not the monotonous struggle

271 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, an overlooked innovative experience led by black women activists, who participate in urban agriculture as a way of re-essing their cultural roots and reclaiming personal power, freed from the constraints imposed by consumerism and marketing, on the supply of food in the city of Detroit.
Abstract: This article analyzes an overlooked innovative experience led by black women activists, who participate in urban agriculture as a way of reas- sessing their cultural roots and reclaiming personal power, freed from the constraints imposed by consumerism and marketing, on the supply of food in the city of Detroit. By farming, they demonstrate agency and self-determination in their efforts to build a sense of community. Using an ecofeminist perspective, this article examines the relationship between women's resistance and the environment. By focusing on women's urban gardening, the article broadens the definition to include less formal, but no less important, forms of resistance. The article is divided into two parts. The first deals with the imple - mentation of the project launched by the members of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network (DBCFSN). Government statistics and secondary research provide the backdrop to the economic problems in the City of Detroit that triggered the community response. The second part presents women farmers' attempts to transform vacant land to cre- ate a community-based food system. These activists construct the farm as a community safe space, which operates as a creative, public outdoor classroom where they nurture activism and challenge the racial and class- based barriers to accessing healthy food. In addition to improving access to healthy food by repurposing vacant land, they are transforming their communities into safe and green spaces.

154 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The food justice movement is pivotally placed to influence the direction of food-systems change as mentioned in this paper, where issues of race and class are resolved will influence the political direction of the food-justice movement's organizational alliances.
Abstract: The global food crisis has pushed the U.S. food movement to a political juncture. A sixth of the world’s population is now hungry—just as a sixth of the U.S. population is “food insecure.” These severe levels of hunger and insecurity share root causes, located in the political economy of a global, corporate food regime. Because of its political location between reformist calls for food security and radical calls for food sovereignty, food justice is pivotally placed to influence the direction of food-systems change. This placement subjects the concept of food justice to multiple claims, definitions, and practices that tend either to affirm a structural focus on resource redistribution, or to dilute its political meaning by focusing on food access. How issues of race and class are resolved will influence the political direction of the food justice movement’s organizational alliances: toward reform or toward transformation. How the food justice movement “pivots” may determine the degree to which it is able to bring about substantive changes to the U.S. food system.

99 citations

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Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
201125
201016
200912
200816
20077