scispace - formally typeset

JournalISSN: 0034-4257

Remote Sensing of Environment 

About: Remote Sensing of Environment is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Normalized Difference Vegetation Index & Vegetation. It has an ISSN identifier of 0034-4257. Over the lifetime, 8876 publication(s) have been published receiving 834564 citation(s).
Papers
More filters

Journal ArticleDOI
Compton J. Tucker1Institutions (1)
Abstract: The relationships between various linear combinations of red and photographic infrared radiances and vegetation parameters are investigated. In situ spectrometers are used to measure the relationships between linear combinations of red and IR radiances, their ratios and square roots, and biomass, leaf water content and chlorophyll content of a grass canopy in June, September and October. Regression analysis shows red-IR combinations to be more significant than green-red combinations. The IR/red ratio, the square root of the IR/red ratio, the vegetation index (IR-red difference divided by their sum) and the transformed vegetation index (the square root of the vegetation index + 0.5) are found to be sensitive to the amount of photosynthetically active vegetation. The accumulation of dead vegetation over the year is found to have a linearizing effect on the various vegetation measures.

7,225 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Russell G. Congalton1Institutions (1)
TL;DR: This paper reviews the necessary considerations and available techniques for assessing the accuracy of remotely sensed data including the classification system, the sampling scheme, the sample size, spatial autocorrelation, and the assessment techniques.
Abstract: This paper reviews the necessary considerations and available techniques for assessing the accuracy of remotely sensed data. Included in this review are the classification system, the sampling scheme, the sample size, spatial autocorrelation, and the assessment techniques. All analysis is based on the use of an error matrix or contingency table. Example matrices and results of the analysis are presented. Future trends including the need for assessment of other spatial data are also discussed.

6,075 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Brent N. Holben1, Thomas F. Eck2, Ilya Slutsker1, Didier Tanré  +9 moreInstitutions (6)
TL;DR: The operation and philosophy of the monitoring system, the precision and accuracy of the measuring radiometers, a brief description of the processing system, and access to the database are discussed.
Abstract: The concept and description of a remote sensing aerosol monitoring network initiated by NASA, developed to support NASA, CNES, and NASDA’s Earth satellite systems under the name AERONET and expanded by national and international collaboration, is described. Recent development of weather-resistant automatic sun and sky scanning spectral radiometers enable frequent measurements of atmospheric aerosol optical properties and precipitable water at remote sites. Transmission of automatic measurements via the geostationary satellites GOES and METEOSATS’ Data Collection Systems allows reception and processing in near real-time from approximately 75% of the Earth’s surface and with the expected addition of GMS, the coverage will increase to 90% in 1998. NASA developed a UNIX-based near real-time processing, display and analysis system providing internet access to the emerging global database. Information on the system is available on the project homepage, http://spamer.gsfc.nasa.gov . The philosophy of an open access database, centralized processing and a user-friendly graphical interface has contributed to the growth of international cooperation for ground-based aerosol monitoring and imposes a standardization for these measurements. The system’s automatic data acquisition, transmission, and processing facilitates aerosol characterization on local, regional, and global scales with applications to transport and radiation budget studies, radiative transfer-modeling and validation of satellite aerosol retrievals. This article discusses the operation and philosophy of the monitoring system, the precision and accuracy of the measuring radiometers, a brief description of the processing system, and access to the database.

5,936 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Alfredo Huete1, Kamel Didan1, Tomoaki Miura1, E.P. Rodriguez1  +2 moreInstitutions (2)
Abstract: We evaluated the initial 12 months of vegetation index product availability from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the Earth Observing System-Terra platform. Two MODIS vegetation indices (VI), the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and enhanced vegetation index (EVI), are produced at 1-km and 500-m resolutions and 16-day compositing periods. This paper presents an initial analysis of the MODIS NDVI and EVI performance from both radiometric and biophysical perspectives. We utilize a combination of site-intensive and regionally extensive approaches to demonstrate the performance and validity of the two indices. Our results showed a good correspondence between airborne-measured, top-of-canopy reflectances and VI values with those from the MODIS sensor at four intensively measured test sites representing semi-arid grass/shrub, savanna, and tropical forest biomes. Simultaneously derived field biophysical measures also demonstrated the scientific utility of the MODIS VI. Multitemporal profiles of the MODIS VIs over numerous biome types in North and South America well represented their seasonal phenologies. Comparisons of the MODIS-NDVI with the NOAA-14, 1-km AVHRR-NDVI temporal profiles showed that the MODIS-based index performed with higher fidelity. The dynamic range of the MODIS VIs are presented and their sensitivities in discriminating vegetation differences are evaluated in sparse and dense vegetation areas. We found the NDVI to asymptotically saturate in high biomass regions such as in the Amazon while the EVI remained sensitive to canopy variations.

5,802 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
Alfredo Huete1Institutions (1)
Abstract: A transformation technique is presented to minimize soil brightness influences from spectral vegetation indices involving red and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths. Graphically, the transformation involves a shifting of the origin of reflectance spectra plotted in NIR-red wavelength space to account for first-order soil-vegetation interactions and differential red and NIR flux extinction through vegetated canopies. For cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. var DPI-70) and range grass (Eragrosticslehmanniana Nees) canopies, underlain with different soil backgrounds, the transformation nearly eliminated soil-induced variations in vegetation indices. A physical basis for the soil-adjusted vegetation index (SAVI) is subsequently presented. The SAVI was found to be an important step toward the establishment of simple °lobal” that can describe dynamic soil-vegetation systems from remotely sensed data.

4,653 citations


Network Information
Related Journals (5)
Remote Sensing

21.2K papers, 310.8K citations

94% related
International Journal of Remote Sensing

8.9K papers, 360.3K citations

94% related
IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing

13K papers, 701.6K citations

91% related
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology

6K papers, 312.5K citations

88% related
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences

4.7K papers, 214.1K citations

84% related
Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202241
2021511
2020503
2019476
2018518
2017384