scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question

Showing papers in "Review of Religious Research in 1964"









Journal ArticleDOI

7 citations









Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For nearly eighteen centuries, the church knew little discrimination within its life; not until white men began to overrun the world did this new division among men by races come to pass; and these originated for the most part outside the churches as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: tian, Asian, African, European, American. For nearly eighteen centuries, the church knew little discrimination within its life; not until white men began to overrun the world did this new division among men by races come to pass; not until the nineteenth century did elaborate justifications of it begin to appear, and these originated for the most part outside the churches. In our time in certain churches -still a small minority, to be found for the most part in the United States, and the Union of South Africa-these pagan theories have largely supplanted the ancient Christian doctrines of brotherhood and have perverted the life of the churches themselves, so that they use these theories even to interpret the Bible.







Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In recent months, in the courts of the land and in the streets of Birmingham, Alabama; Albany, Georgia; Cambridge, Maryland; Brooklyn, New York; Detroit, Michigan; and Chicago, Illinois and nearly every other sizable community, we have again engaged in a great struggle as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Five-score years ago one of our greatest forefathers considered that this nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, could long endure only if its people were free. In recent months, in the courts of the land and in the streets of Birmingham, Alabama; Albany, Georgia; Cambridge, Maryland; Brooklyn, New York; Detroit, Michigan; and Chicago, Illinois and nearly every other sizable community, we have again engaged in a great struggle. Lincoln emancipated the slaves but he did not succeed in really setting the Negro free. Those who carry on in his spirit will never be content until this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom and government of, by, and for the people shall be established in fact on the earth.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: One of the types of community action most often undertaken in Northern cities, frequently under the sponsorship of local religious leaders, is the "Open Housing Closet" (OHC) campaign as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Public awareness of the problem of racial injustice has attained unprecedented heights during recent years, and most major religious bodies have attempted to heighten that awareness and channel it into social action designed to help overcome the problem. One of the types of community action most often undertaken in Northern cities, frequently under the sponsorship of local religious leaders, is the "open housing covenant"' (OHC) campaign. In contrast to the racially restrictive covenant-which was declared




Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: For example, the authors argues that the goals we seek, the things we do, the judgments we make, even the experiments we are willing to try, are determined by our beliefs about the nature of man and his capacities.
Abstract: Whatever we do in teaching depends upon what we think people are like. The goals we seek, the things we do, the judgments we make, even the experiments we are willing to try, are determined by our beliefs about the nature of man and his capacities. It has always been so. Teachers who believe children can, will try to teach them. Teachers who believe children are unable, give up trying or spend their days on a treadmill, hopelessly making motions they never expect will matter. The beliefs we hold about people can serve as prison walls limiting us at every turn. They can also set us free from our shackles to confront great new possibilities never dreamed of before. No beliefs will be more important to education than those we hold about the nature of man and the limits of his potentials. Whenever our ideas about human capacities change, the goals of teaching must change too. Whatever we decide is the best that man can become must necessarily set the goals of education.2