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JournalISSN: 0734-8584

Rhetorica-a Journal of The History of Rhetoric 

University of California Press
About: Rhetorica-a Journal of The History of Rhetoric is an academic journal published by University of California Press. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Rhetoric & Rhetorical question. It has an ISSN identifier of 0734-8584. Over the lifetime, 301 publications have been published receiving 1837 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
James Aho1
TL;DR: In this article, a merchant's double-entry bookkeeping satisfies the world of his just dealing, and is the fairest and best Apologies of his innocence and honesty to the World, and contributes exceedingly to the satisfaction of all his friends and well-wishers, and to the Confutation and silencing of all malevolent and detracting enemies, and proves the great cause to bring him to a most favourable Composition with his Creditor.
Abstract: If he [the merchant] be fortunate it [i.e. double-entry bookkeeping] satisfies the world of his just dealing, and is the fairest and best Apologies of his innocence and honesty to the World, and Contributes exceedingly to the satisfaction of all his friends and well-wishers, and to the Confutation and silencing of all his malevolent and detracting enemies, and proves the great cause to bring him to a most favourable Composition with his Creditor: whereas those that are ignorant of it, in such a Condition are censured by all, when they have nothing to show but bare words to vindicate themselves.

107 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Poetria nova as mentioned in this paper was a self-conscious attempt to update Horace's Art of Poetry by changing its precepts to the exigencies of the medieval schoolroom.
Abstract: eoffrey of Vinsauf is famous as the premier exponent of the medieval art of poetry. His versified treatise, the Poetria nova, was a self-conscious attempt to update Horace's Art of Poetry, the Poetria vetus, by taUoring its precepts to the exigencies of the medieval schoolroom. The effort was a complete success, and the Poetria nova quickly became by far the most widely used textbook on the ars podriae, as evidenced by its preservation in nearly 200 manuscripts from all over Europe.' Less weU known is the fact that Geoffrey concerned himself with the composition of prose as well as verse. In fact, he wrote as many as three prose treatises deaUng at least partially with the composition of prose. Though none of these treatises achieved anything approaching the international popularity of the Poetria nova, they are valuable for indicating the full scope of Geoffrey's teaching. Moreover, one of them, the stUl unpublished treatise called the long Documentum, was sufficiently important to be imitated by two of Geoffrey's contemporaries and to rival the Poetria nova's popularity in the schools of fourteenthand fifteenth-century En-

68 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The influence of dictaminal treatises in England was weak throughout the Middle Ages and largely restricted to a limited number of royal clerks and a few academics as discussed by the authors, who dealt with foreign and ecclesiastical powers.
Abstract: The influence of dictaminal treatises in England was weak throughout the Middle Ages and largely restricted to a limited number of royal clerks and a few academics. Most practitioners were royal chancery clerks who dealt with foreign and ecclesiastical powers. This article focuses chiefly on the use of dictaminal letters by middle class English citizens in the fifteenth and earlier sixteenth centuries. These letters show little significant influence of continental or English dictaminal theory but are chiefly either sprawling news bulletins like the Paston letters or, more commonly, imitations of the royal missives from the Signet or Privy Seal offices. As the fifteenth century ended even these vestigial dictaminal forms were replaced among the middles classes by business formats, such as the letter of credit, although they retained some use among the upper classes into the sixteenth century and in some royal missives into the eighteenth century. The article concludes with suggestions on ways contemporary genre theory might be usefully applied to analyze the rise and decline of the ars dictaminis .

62 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
Peter W. Rose1
TL;DR: The authors examines Cicero9s relation to Roman imperialism by focusing primarily upon his speech in behalf of Pompey9s special command against Mithradates (Pro lege Manilia, 66 BC) and his speeches in favor of extending Caesar9s command in Gaul (De provinciis consularibus, 56 BC).
Abstract: This paper examines Cicero9s relation to Roman imperialism by focusing primarily upon his speech in behalf of Pompey9s special command against Mithradates (Pro lege Manilia, 66 BC) and his speech in favor of extending Caesar9s command in Gaul (De provinciis consularibus, 56 BC). These two moments in which Cicero contributed substantially to the empowerment of the two great imperialist generais who destroyed the Republic suggest the need to reassess versions of Cicero9s career which see film primarily in terms of domestic Roman politics and cast him as the heroic, would-be savior of the Republic. Applying a Marxist reading particularly indebted to Pierre Macherey, I try to explore the internal contradictions of the texts as pointers to the contradictions of late Republican society, contradictions which constitute the very conditions of possibility for Cicero9s political participation.

50 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202324
202258
20192
20185
20176
20169