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Showing papers in "Rhetorica-a Journal of The History of Rhetoric in 2016"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that Rādūyānī9s vernacularization is most consequential with respect to its transformation of the classical Arabic tropes of metaphor ( istiʿāra ) and comparison ( tashbīh ) to suit the new exigencies of a New Persian literary culture.
Abstract: Notwithstanding its value as the earliest extant New Persian treatment of the art of rhetoric, Rādūyānī9s Interpreter of Rhetoric ( Tarjumān al-Balāgha ) has yet to be read from the vantage point of comparative poetics. Composed in the Ferghana region of modern Central Asia between the end of the eleventh century and the beginning of the twelfth century, Rādūyānī9s vernacularization of classical Arabic norms inaugurated literary theory in the New Persian language. I argue here that Rādūyānī9s vernacularization is most consequential with respect to its transformation of the classical Arabic tropes of metaphor ( istiʿāra ) and comparison ( tashbīh ) to suit the new exigencies of a New Persian literary culture. In reversing the relation between metaphor and comparison enshrined in Arabic aesthetics, Rādūyānī concretized the Persian contribution to the global study of literary form.

6 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a rhetorical model for the function of notational writing in sixteenth and seventeenth-century European mathematics is proposed and explicated, and mathematical enargeia enables the transformation of images of mathematical imagination resulting from an encounter with mathematical writing into further written acts of mathematical creation.
Abstract: This article proposes and explicates a rhetorical model for the function of notational writing in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century European mathematics. Drawing on enargeia 9s requirement that both author and reader contribute to the full realization of a text, mathematical enargeia enables the transformation of images of mathematical imagination resulting from an encounter with mathematical writing into further written acts of mathematical creation. Mathematical enargeia provides readers with an ability to understand a text as if they created it themselves. Within the period9s dominant reading of classical geometry as a synthetic presentation that suppressed, hid, or obscured analytic mathematical reality, notational mathematics found favor as a rhetorically unmediated expression of mathematical truth. Consequently, mathematical enargeia creates an operational and presentational link between mathematics9 past and its future.

6 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This paper examined the uses of the term harmonia in the Rhetoric and Poetics and identified a consistent meaning of this word when applied to the literary arts, finding that harmonia commonly denotes the melodic component of music and speech, but is mentioned in connection with the hexametric rhythm in two parallel passages from the Poetics.
Abstract: This study examines the uses of the term harmonia in Aristotle9s Rhetoric and Poetics and aims at identifying a consistent meaning of this word when applied to the literary arts. A difficulty arises from the fact that harmonia commonly denotes the melodic component of music and speech, but is mentioned in connection with the hexametric rhythm in two parallel passages from the Poetics and the Rhetoric , the latter of which is textually problematic. The solution presented in this article suggests an interpretation which assigns to harmonia the meaning of ‘speech melody’ and supports the least disruptive emendation of the contested passage from the Rhetoric .

4 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Swaminathan as discussed by the authors re-examines the rhetoric of Ramsay9s publication and the ensuing pamphlet war for the "definitional rupture" in the term "master" and argues that the tyranny of absolute mastery is inherent in African slavery.
Abstract: The West India planter-master became the most vilified figure in British literature as a result of the abolitionist campaign to end the slave trade. The abolitionist primarily responsible for this shift in perception is James Ramsay, specifically in the controversy around his Essay on the Treatment and Conversion of African Slaves in the British Sugar Colonies (1784). He argues that the tyranny of absolute mastery is inherent in African slavery. This essay re-examines the rhetoric of Ramsay9s publication and the ensuing pamphlet war for the “definitional rupture” in the term “master.” This new planter-master, configured as wholly corrupt, shifted the paradigm and created a powerful trope for abolitionists. Srividhya Swaminathan, Long Island University Brooklyn, srividhya.swaminathan@liu.edu.

3 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors deal with the conception of rhetoric of one of the most prominent Renaissance scholars, Francesco Robortello, and focus in particular on his vernacular manuscript entitled Dell9oratore, probably his final statement on the topic, the transcription of which is included in the appendix.
Abstract: This paper deals with the conception of rhetoric of one of the most prominent Renaissance scholars, Francesco Robortello, and focuses in particular on his vernacular manuscript entitled Dell9oratore , probably his final statement on the topic, the transcription of which is included in the appendix. The study of the manuscript will be integrated with the examination of Robortello9s Latin published works on rhetoric, that is De rhetorica facultate (1548) and De artificio dicendi (1567), as well as of some of his schemes in printed and manuscript form.

3 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors suggests that an alternate multivalent or "fuzzy" rhetoric would have proved a more positive environment for the new ideas, and describes how rhetorical studies might use this rhetoric to change the ways we respond to and teach persuasion and argumentation.
Abstract: Sally Miller Gearhart9s 1979 remark that “any intent to persuade is an act of violence” based in “conversion/conquest” argumentation 2 , led many feminists, in the eighties and nineties, to describe more cooperative alternative models of academic argument. However, their critiques and suggestions had little field impact, largely due to negative reactions in relevant journals. The polarized reactions, typical of what Deborah Tannen calls our “Argument Culture,” resulted in dismissive and condemnatory rhetoric, and fruitful ideas were lost. This essay suggests that an alternate multivalent or “fuzzy” rhetoric would have proved a more positive environment for the new ideas, and describes how rhetorical studies might use this rhetoric to change the ways we respond to and teach persuasion and argumentation.

2 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Very little has been written about the quite noticeable tendency of God to address himself in the Old Testament, starting with the opening chapters in Genesis and continuing, intermittently, until 2 Kings as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Very little has been written about the quite noticeable tendency of God to address himself in the Old Testament, starting with the opening chapters in Genesis and continuing, intermittently, until 2 Kings. These speeches may very well be the oldest examples we have of what James Hirsh calls “self-addressed soliloquies,” but they cannot be analyzed based on some of the theoretical ideas of Kenneth Burke, Chaim Perelman and Lucie Olbrechts-Tyteca, Augustine (who invented the term), or Harold Bloom. As my analysis of these speeches shows, God9s rhetoric in these speeches, his ethos, is highly elliptical, ironic, and contradicts most of what readers expect from a soliloquy.

1 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Although Alardus of Amsterdam9s commentary to the Latin translation of the Greek rhetorician Aphtonius9 Progymnasmata by Rodolphus Agricola did not have the influence of the one by Reinhardus Lorichius, who used the partim Agricola, partim Catanaeo translation, it was published previously and served as a model to later commentaries as discussed by the authors.
Abstract: Although Alardus of Amsterdam9s commentary to the Latin translation of the Greek rhetorician Aphtonius9 Progymnasmata by Rodolphus Agricola did not have the influence of the one by Reinhardus Lorichius, who used the partim Agricola, partim Catanaeo translation, it was published previously and served as a model to later commentaries. Thus, Lorichius and Juan de Mal Lara9s commentaries exhibit many similarities with the one by Alardus as regards commented expressions and contents. However, we cannot talk of servile imitation as, in spite of the clear coincidences, we also find important differences, and every commentator shows a personal view and presents his own contributions.

1 citations