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Showing papers in "Scholarly and Research Communication in 2013"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This bibliography has been written to inform the INKE research group on physical aspects of digital scholarly reading to inform an integrated approach in the development of new research environments.
Abstract: In the development of new research environments, hardware has often been neglected. E-readers have (reasonably) successfully been developed for leisurely reading, but reading with the goal of writing demands a different approach. This bibliography has been written to inform the INKE research group on physical aspects of digital scholarly reading. It consists of two parts: a hardware section, including a description of commercial e-readers as well as an overview of academically developed digital reading devices and a software section, also including commercially available packages next to academically developed reading environments which allow for flexible manipulation of text and other modalities; as well as reflections on digital scholarly reading. Combined, the two sections inform an integrated approach in the development of new research environments.

18 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the nature of collaboration within Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) after two years of funded research and make recommendations for similar long-term, large-scale project teams.
Abstract: Use of project teams is increasing; however l ittle is known about collaboration as it actually occurs over project’s life. This paper explores nature of collaboration within Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) after two years of funded research. The second year is characterized by forward research progress, positive relationships, and transitions and challenges related to human resources, team restructuring and partner institutional policies. INKE is drawing upon structures and processes, including in-person meetings, multiple communication channels and evolving governance documents to support the collaboration. The paper concludes with recommendations for similar long term, large-scale project team.

15 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the field of classical studies, the authors pointed out that the digital age may mean the end of the history of variants and of the notion of the "original text." Among the texts of antiquity, the editing of the New Testament is more especially susceptible to the effects of digital technology because of their numerous manuscripts.
Abstract: The field of classical studies has undergone a radical transformation with the arrival of the digital age, particularly with regard to the editing of ancient texts. As Umberto Eco (2003) pointed out, the digital age may mean the end of the history of variants and of the notion of the "original text." Among the texts of antiquity, the editing of Homer and of the New Testament are more especially susceptible to the effects of digital technology because of their numerous manuscripts. Whereas the "Homer Multitext" project recognizes that the notion of a synthetic critical edition is now seriously brought into question, the prototype of the online Greek New Testament continues to be based on the aim of obtaining a unique text, in the style of a printed critical edition. As it moves from a printed culture to the digital age, the editing of the Greek NT is also confronted by the emergence of non-Western scholarship. For example, the presence is to be noted of Arabic Muslim websites that examine Greek New Testament manuscripts but without directly interacting with Western scholarship.

15 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The lessons from this work suggest that the way forward is to provide scholars with more holistic support for visualization and exploration of topic model output, while integrating topic models with more traditional workflows oriented around assembling and refining sets of relevant documents.
Abstract: 0 0 1 144 823 City University of New York 6 1 966 14.0 Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} In spite of what Ed Folsom has called the “epic transformation of archives,” referring to the shift from print to digital archival form, methods for exploring these digitized collections remain underdeveloped. One method prompted by digitization is the application of automated text mining techniques such as topic modeling -- a computational method for identifying the themes that recur across an archive of documents. We review the nascent literature on topic modeling of literary archives, and present a case study, applying a topic model to the Papers of Thomas Jefferson. The lessons from this work suggest that the way forward is to provide scholars with more holistic support for visualization and exploration of topic model output, while integrating topic models with more traditional workflows oriented around assembling and refining sets of relevant documents. We describe our ongoing effort to develop a novel software system that implements these ideas.

12 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors explore the nature of collaboration within Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) after three years of funded research and make recommendations for similar long-term, large-scale project teams.
Abstract: Use of project teams is increasing, however little is known about collaboration as it actually occurs over the life of projects. This article explores the nature of collaboration within Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) after three years of funded research. The third year is characterized by change and transition with new team members, partners, and sub-research areas. INKE continues to draw upon structures and processes, including team-building activities, in-person meetings, multiple communication channels, evolving governance documents to support the collaboration, and the incorporation of collaboration-ready individuals. The article concludes with recommendations for similar long term, large-scale project teams.

9 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors discuss the state-of-the-art in digital "genetic" editing, that is the philological analysis (and presentation) of the processes behind the creation of literary texts.
Abstract: This paper discusses the state-of-the-art in digital “genetic” editing, that is the philological analysis (and presentation) of the processes behind the creation of literary texts. Research on such processes is mainly based on draft manuscripts or typescripts that authors have left behind intentionally or accidentally. Creative note-taking, revisions, proof-readings, cross-linkings and additional material makes them a complex and interwoven set of data requiring specific analytic tools and reading and research environments for both general and specialist readers and users to understand them better. The paper traces the idea of pre-electronic genetic editing and the significant changes it is undergoing in the digital era. It compares two editorial projects on renowned authors, one in print and one digital: the so-called ‘Frankfurt edition’ of Friedrich Holderlin, and the Samuel Beckett Digital Manuscript Project. The paper discusses these in particular as “reading environments” (or user interfaces) designed for “critically experiencing” authorial writing processes in both the print and the digital medium.

6 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present what transpired in 18 months joint health research communication project at Makerere University School of Public Health in Uganda and conclude that research communication in Uganda is still low and ill coordinated.
Abstract: This field note presents what transpired in 18 months joint health research communication project at Makerere University School of Public Health. The project was the first of this nature at the university, in Uganda and probably in East Africa. Information on how the project was conceived, implemented and its results is given. It gives an overview of a communication framework that resulted from the process that informs anyone considering investing in research communication in a low resource institution or country. The note provides key themes of advocacy, community and user participation, influencing policy, fundraising and networking that arose from observations, interaction and activities and a situation review of the post project. It concludes that research communication in Uganda is still low and ill coordinated. Cette note de champ presente ce qui s'est passe dans le projet de communication recherche 18 mois mixte sur la sante a Makerere University School of Public Health. Le projet a ete le premier de cette nature a l'Universite, en Ouganda et probablement en Afrique de l'est. Informations sur la facon dont le projet a ete concu, mis en œuvre et de ses resultats est donne. Il donne un apercu d'un cadre de communication qui resulte du processus qui informe toute personne tenant compte investir dans la communication de la recherche dans une institution de faibles ressources ou un pays. La note fournit les themes cles de la defense, la participation communautaire et l'utilisateur, peuvent influencer les politiques, la collecte de fonds et de reseautage qui decoule des observations, interaction, des activites et une situation d'examen du projet post. Il conclut que la communication de la recherche en Ouganda est encore faible et mal coordonnee.

6 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The forensic details of Agrippa and its cryptographic routines are described, which demonstrate that Kirschenbaum’s thesis of “no round trip” is mistaken and that AgrippA was fully cracked and reverse-engineered in the course of an online, global cryptanalysis challenge.
Abstract: In The Laws of Cool, Liu (2004) argues that the art book Agrippa (A Book of the Dead) (Gibson, 1992) is an exhibit of destructive creativity. According to Liu, the book’s great auto-da-fe occurs when the software program, which is included with the book, displays an electronic poem, and then self-encrypts, a mechanism that destroys or “permanently disappears” (p. 340) the poem. This article argues that Liu’s understanding of encryption is incorrect. Encryption is not destruction because enciphered text is necessarily subject to cryptanalysis (“cracking”). Relatedly, this article demonstrates that Kirschenbaum’s thesis of “no round trip” is mistaken (Kirschenbaum, Reside, & Liu, 2008). Agrippa was fully cracked and reverse-engineered in the course of an online, global cryptanalysis challenge. This article describes the forensic details of Agrippa and its cryptographic routines.

5 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The relationship between textual studies and interface design in INKE, a project for Implementing New Knowledge En environments, will be theorized to inform the development of a dynamic table of contexts for books and reading in the digital medium.
Abstract: This paper presents a brief account of the form and function of the “table of contents” to establish a theoretical framework for understanding the form and function of this common element of book architecture with the aim of informing the development of a dynamic table of contexts for books and reading in the digital medium. This paper will thus theorize the relationship between textual studies and interface design in INKE, a project for Implementing New Knowledge Environments.

4 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is argued that databases are not always models and that the boundary between model and database helps us to understand the advantages and limitations of both.
Abstract: Willard McCarty’s Humanities Computing (2005) opens a dialogue about modelling in the humanities I extend that conversation by complicating his version of the model and by looking at the limits of modelling to find out what it is not I suggest that, unlike scientific models, humanist models cannot be separated from the mode of Humanism that produced them I argue that databases are not always models and that the boundary between model and database helps us to understand the advantages and limitations of both A renewed appreciation of database culture can help to move humanist scholarship in new directions

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) as discussed by the authors is a research foundation for reading, writing, and researching the Caribbean and thus as part of the scholarly cyberinfrastructure for Caribbean Studies.
Abstract: This article explains the history and development of the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) as a research foundation for reading, writing, and researching the Caribbean and thus as part of the scholarly cyberinfrastructure for Caribbean Studies. As a research foundation, dLOC includes technical, social, governmental, and procedural supports including open source tools, executive and scholarly advisory boards for governance, permissions-based rights model to support intellectual property as well as cultural and moral rights, and a core support team. As a research foundation, dLOC supports new forms of research as well as new ways of reading and writing Caribbean Studies.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The use of digital technology and text markup in the production and dissemination of scholarship is described, as static, linked arguments and paragraphs reflect the constraints, limitations but important use of print technology.
Abstract: This article describes the use of digital technology and text markup in the production and dissemination of scholarship. Traditional narrative, as static, linked arguments and paragraphs reflect the constraints, limitations but important use of print technology. “Reconfiguring the narrative” to reflect the capabilities of online scholarship enables readers and writers to engage in more thorough explorations of the text, theory, concepts, and interpretations (Landow, 2006).

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors examine the historical separation between the trades of graphic designer and typographer and discuss some of the advantages of having the designers of electronic interfaces become familiar with book typography traditions and of having electronic reading interfaces support basic typographic practices.
Abstract: Designing for the Internet can be a wonderfully enlivening experience for the graphic designer. But it can be an equally frustrating experience for typographers, as their control over typeface, word spacing, justification, and the other myriad details that define a well-crafted printed page is reduced to the most rudimentary choices. This article will examine this apparent disjuncture by first briefly outlining the historical separation between the trades of graphic designer and typographer and then discussing some of the advantages of having the designers of electronic interfaces become familiar with book typography traditions and of having electronic reading interfaces support basic typographic practices.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: How researchers in Africa can join global academic conversations through a rethinking of their research work flows, and how they can strategically position themselves and their research in knowledge streams for rippling impact is discussed.
Abstract: Researchers in Africa have typically been regarded as consumers, not producers, of academic information. More recently, open access publishing has been advanced as a way of getting research from Africa more easily and widely available, but there needs to be more than just changes to the dissemination outlet. This article discusses how researchers in Africa can join global academic conversations through a rethinking of their research work flows, and how they can strategically position themselves and their research in knowledge streams for rippling impact.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Gill's illustrations for the Golden Cockerel Press invite exploration into the social function of erotic texts, public versus private reading, fine book-making practices, and more, and they hope to provide the tools to allow scholars to engage with these texts in their multiplicity as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: Different readers approach a text in different ways and for different reasons, so designers of interfaces for electronic reading and scholarship must strive for flexibility Eric Gill’s illustrations for the Golden Cockerel Press invite exploration into the social function of erotic texts, public versus private reading, fine book-making practices, and more, and we hope to provide the tools to allow scholars to engage with these texts in their multiplicity There may also be readers who just want to read the texts and look at the pictures, and we need to make sure we do not ignore their needs Most importantly, there are, or will be, readers who want to interact with the texts in ways that we cannot imagine, and we need to do all we can to make this experimentation possible

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authorship pattern, availability, and accessibility of articles during 2008-2010 from the Indian Agricultural Research Institute (IARI), a constituent of the National Agricultural Research System in India.
Abstract: This article focuses on the trends in publication, authorship pattern, availability, and accessibility of articles during 2008–2010 from the Indian Agricultural Research Institute (IARI), a constituent of the National Agricultural Research System in India. The data reveal that during the period of study, researchers from IARI produced 1,833 publications, most of which were jointly authored, and that the most preferred journal for publication by researchers is the Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, which is now an Open Access journal. While publications from IARI are available to subscribers of the Consortium for e-Resources in Agriculture (CeRA), public availability to IARI publications is very meager. Hence, in order to make their research output more accessible and available to a wider audience, IARI researchers should deposit their work in IARI’s Open Access repository Eprints@IARI. However, making such a deposit requires an Open Access policy, which IARI is yet to adopt.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The strengths of this project as well as its shortcomings are assessed and some suggestions that, if adopted, would make Wikisource the ultimate platform for reading and editing scholarly books are made.
Abstract: Wikisource, a project of the Wikimedia foundation, is a growing online library aiming to provide well-edited texts thanks to an army of volunteers. In this paper, I try to assess the strengths of this project as well as its shortcomings and I make some suggestions that, if adopted, would make Wikisource the ultimate platform for reading and editing scholarly books.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article assess the scholarly potential of editing in public with contributions and feedback from the existing knowledge communities surrounding Wikibooks, Wikipedia, Twitter, and other social media spaces, and report on the ongoing social edition-building process.
Abstract: This article reports on the ongoing social edition-building process. Using the social edition of the Devonshire Manuscript as a case study, the authors assess the scholarly potential of editing in public with contributions and feedback from the existing knowledge communities surrounding Wikibooks, Wikipedia, Twitter, and other social media spaces. Working at the intersection of academic and social media culture, they share the feedback of their advisory board, Twitter followers, and Wikipedia editors.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The digital humanities project on the visualization of French poet Stephane Mallarme’s works is used to explore models of reading the digital, and what aspects of reading cannot be accounted for by the types of digital textual analysis done so far in the digital humanities.
Abstract: In theorizing the digital text, I will take a two-pronged approach: a) what aspects of reading cannot be accounted for by the types of digital textual analysis done so far in the digital humanities, and b) how can technology (be “used” to) account for such possibilities? To answer the second question, we need to stop seeing the computer as a “means” (i.e. we “use” a computer) and to start thinking about the computer itself as a part of the literary process. This is perhaps to blur the distinction between e-literature and media studies on the one hand, and digital humanities on the other. However, it presupposes that technology is not something to be feared (as “tampering” with the text), but that it is rather something intrinsic, to be conceived on its own terms. Indeed, the computer can enhance the literary experience and highlight aspects of the text that were not noticed before, and vice versa, in a sort of feedback circuit, bringing with it hermeneutic questions that hitherto have been only indirect. What might we discover from exploring the symbiotic relationship between the text and the machine and about the minds and bodies that encounter these? Such encounters occur not only through visualization, but through sonorization and through the body. Such hybrid encounters require a broader view of language than that provided by information theory, which has apparently dominated digital literary studies. I will use my own digital humanities project on the visualization of French poet Stephane Mallarme’s works ( http :// mallarme . uvic . ca ) to explore models of reading the digital.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Some of the requirements for a deeper engagement with texts, both in terms of the needed functionality, which includes commenting, annotating, translating, but also linking and enriching the texts and the needed overall architecture and the desired modes of communication between readers of such texts are discussed.
Abstract: Electronic publishing, especially publishing for the Web, is slowly becoming the main avenue for the dissemination of scholarly edited versions of primary texts. While this is a welcome development and increases access to high quality resources for casual users, it also poses new hindrances to deeper engagement with texts published in such a way. This article discusses some of the requirements for such a deeper engagement with texts, both in terms of the needed functionality, which includes commenting, annotating, translating, but also linking and enriching the texts and in terms of the needed overall architecture and the desired modes of communication between readers of such texts.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A new method of digitizing printing blocks and archiving them in an online image database is presented to draw attention to what kind of information the authors can retrieve from the blocks, especially circumstances of publishing that conventional bibliographies based on the printed books cannot reveal.
Abstract: A great number of printed books were published in Japan after the establishment of commercial publishing in the Edo period (1603–1867) Even though it is well-known that most of the books were printed by means of woodblocks, these printing blocks have not been studied in detail because they are difficult to access and physically handle However, digitization of the printing blocks revolutionizes research and also facilitates information sharing This article will present a new method of digitizing printing blocks and archiving them in an online image database The article will also draw attention to what kind of information we can retrieve from the blocks, especially circumstances of publishing that conventional bibliographies based on the printed books cannot reveal

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The INKE Research Group comprises over 35 researchers (and their research assistants and postdoctoral fellows) at more than 20 universities in Canada, England, the United States, and Ireland, and across 20 partners in the public and private sectors.
Abstract: The INKE Research Group comprises over 35 researchers (and their research assistants and postdoctoral fellows) at more than 20 universities in Canada, England, the United States, and Ireland, and across 20 partners in the public and private sectors. INKE is a large-scale, long-term, interdisciplinary project to study the future of books and reading, supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada as well as contributions from participating universities and partners, and bringing together activities associated with book history and textual scholarship; user experience studies; interface design; and prototyping of digital reading environments. Constance Crompton is Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities and English in the Department of Critical Studies in the Faculty of Creative and Critical Studies at UBC Okanagan. Email: constance.crompton@ubc.ca .

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: NewRadial is a prototype scholarly edition environment developed to address the unification of primary texts, secondary scholarship and related knowledge communities, and re-presents the digital scholarly edition as a social edition, an open work and shared space where users collaboratively explore, sort, group, annotate and contribute to secondary scholarship creation.
Abstract: INKE’s Modelling and Prototyping group is currently motivated by the following research questions: How do we model and enable context within the electronic scholarly edition? And how do we engage knowledge-building communities and capture process, dialogue and connections in and around the electronic scholarly edition? NewRadial is a prototype scholarly edition environment developed to address such queries. It argues for the unification of primary texts, secondary scholarship and related knowledge communities, and re-presents the digital scholarly edition as a social edition, an open work and shared space where users collaboratively explore, sort, group, annotate and contribute to secondary scholarship creation. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";}

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A set of prototypes designed and created by the Interface Design team of the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) project attempt to supplement the user experience in reading digital scholarly editions, by supporting a set of tasks that are straightforward in a digital environment but in a print edition would be sufficiently more difficult as to be prohibitive.
Abstract: This article discusses a set of prototypes currently being designed and created by the Interface Design team of the Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE) project. These prototypes attempt to supplement the user experience in reading digital scholarly editions, by supporting a set of tasks that are straightforward in a digital environment but in a print edition would be sufficiently more difficult as to be prohibitive. We therefore offer these experimental prototypes as a collection of new affordances for the scholarly edition, although they may reasonably be extended, with some variation, to other kinds of digital text.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This project/pilot study intends to select a series of media fragments that include poetic, visual, and language texts, as well as those that combine these features, and present them on a variety of screen-centred interfaces to explore their cognitive and aesthetic effects and features.
Abstract: There is an urgent need to examine the ways in which screen-centred interfaces present images and encode and decode meaning, identity, and culture. This project is an interdisciplinary collaboration by four researchers at the University of Regina and builds on our work on screen-centred interfaces in our respective disciplines of cognitive psychology, literary studies, media studies, and software systems engineering. The fundamental goals of our collaborative project are to engage interdisciplinary means and perspectives to systematically develop effective methodologies to measure cognitive processes, aesthetic effects, and software and hardware efficacy of the new and developing digital media. In this project/pilot study we intend to select a series of media fragments that include poetic, visual, and language texts, as well as those that combine these features, and present them on a variety of screen-centred interfaces to explore their cognitive and aesthetic effects and features.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The category of interface is taken and adapts it to studying the design of the corpus and edition and it is found that ways of thinking about the relationship between design, knowledge and audience across media find themselves remediating concepts like interface.
Abstract: How can we study the interface of scholarly knowledge across print and digital epochs? To ask about interface across epochs is to take a concept that makes sense in the digital world and anachronistically bring it to bear on print in a way that could confuse both. Nonetheless we need to develop ways of thinking about the relationship between design, knowledge and audience across media, and to do that we find ourselves remediating concepts like interface. This paper takes the category of interface and adapts it to studying the design of the corpus and edition.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: How novel technology affects readers’ understanding of digital objects is examined and some of the uproar stems from the novelty of the techniques used in the manipulation, rather than the manipulation itself.
Abstract: This article examines how novel technology affects readers’ understanding of digital objects. It begins by examining some recent scandals involving digitally manipulated photographs and argues that some of the uproar stems from the novelty of the techniques used in the manipulation, rather than the manipulation itself. It then explores some of the challenges in using novel technology to mediate the representation of historical objects in scholarly form. The article concludes with some thoughts on early experiments with the objects of the Visionary Cross project, a digital edition of a collection of objects belonging to the Anglo-Saxon “Visionary Cross” tradition.

Journal ArticleDOI
Jon Saklofske1
TL;DR: This article promotes a theoretical evolution in the conceptualisation and operation of digital literary archives via NewRadial, a prototype archive application that models the following distinction: Whereas a digital edition continues to function as a primary source, the root of a secondary discourse field much like its print-based predecessor, the digital archive should be reconceived as a broader, active, dynamic public record.
Abstract: This article promotes a theoretical evolution in the conceptualisation and operation of digital literary archives via NewRadial, a prototype archive application that models the following distinction: Whereas a digital edition continues to function as a primary source, the root of a secondary discourse field much like its print-based predecessor, the digital archive should be reconceived as a broader, active, dynamic public record, an information commons that substantiates a foundational collection of primary texts with a continuous aggregation of critical contexts and conversations that grow from that foundation.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the authors present a dynamic repository interface to support numerous scholarly activities, starting with the four fundamental functions associated with persistent storage: create, read, update, and delete (CRUD).
Abstract: This article addresses the design of a dynamic repository interface to support numerous scholarly activities. Starting with the four fundamental functions associated with persistent storage — create, read, update, and delete (CRUD) — we tested, as an organizing rubric for the interface, the acronym CREAM: Create (represent, illustrate); Read (sample, read); Enhance (refer, annotate, process); Analyze (search, select, visualize, mine, cluster); and Manage (track, label, transform). Based on a card-sorting exercise conducted with researchers, we conclude that a slightly modified rubric of CREAMS offers a useful starting point that emphasizes the enriched functionality a scholarly repository or similarly complex digital environment requires, as well as the immense challenge of designing conceptually clear interfaces, even for a relatively homogenous community of researchers.