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JournalISSN: 0048-9697

Science of The Total Environment

About: Science of The Total Environment is an academic journal. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Population & Soil water. It has an ISSN identifier of 0048-9697. Over the lifetime, 50214 publication(s) have been published receiving 1525276 citation(s).

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Topics: Population, Soil water, Water quality ...read more
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Open accessJournal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.SCITOTENV.2013.12.065
Yunlong Luo1, Wenshan Guo1, Huu Hao Ngo1, Long D. Nghiem2  +4 moreInstitutions (4)
Abstract: Micropollutants are emerging as a new challenge to the scientific community. This review provides a summary of the recent occurrence of micropollutants in the aquatic environment including sewage, surface water, groundwater and drinking water. The discharge of treated effluent from WWTPs is a major pathway for the introduction of micropollutants to surface water. WWTPs act as primary barriers against the spread of micropollutants. WWTP removal efficiency of the selected micropollutants in 14 countries/regions depicts compound-specific variation in removal, ranging from 12.5 to 100%. Advanced treatment processes, such as activated carbon adsorption, advanced oxidation processes, nanofiltration, reverse osmosis, and membrane bioreactors can achieve higher and more consistent micropollutant removal. However, regardless of what technology is employed, the removal of micropollutants depends on physico-chemical properties of micropollutants and treatment conditions. The evaluation of micropollutant removal from municipal wastewater should cover a series of aspects from sources to end uses. After the release of micropollutants, a better understanding and modeling of their fate in surface water is essential for effectively predicting their impacts on the receiving environment.

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  • Table 1 Sources of micropollutants in the aquatic environmet.
    Table 1 Sources of micropollutants in the aquatic environmet.
  • Table 2. The concentrations and removals of the selected micropollutants in conventional WWPTs in different countries.
    Table 2. The concentrations and removals of the selected micropollutants in conventional WWPTs in different countries.
  • Table 4 Occurrence of some common micropollutants in surface waters in different countries.
    Table 4 Occurrence of some common micropollutants in surface waters in different countries.
  • Table 5 Occurrence of some common micropollutants in groundwater in different countries.
    Table 5 Occurrence of some common micropollutants in groundwater in different countries.
  • Fig. 2. Maximum occurrence concentrations of some most abundant micropollutants in drinking water (Benotti et al., 2008, Huerta-Fontela et al., 2011, Kleywegt et al., 2011, Vulliet et al., 2011 and Wang
    Fig. 2. Maximum occurrence concentrations of some most abundant micropollutants in drinking water (Benotti et al., 2008, Huerta-Fontela et al., 2011, Kleywegt et al., 2011, Vulliet et al., 2011 and Wang
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2,291 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.SCITOTENV.2006.09.014
Jan Vymazal1Institutions (1)
Abstract: The processes that affect removal and retention of nitrogen during wastewater treatment in constructed wetlands (CWs) are manifold and include NH(3) volatilization, nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, plant and microbial uptake, mineralization (ammonification), nitrate reduction to ammonium (nitrate-ammonification), anaerobic ammonia oxidation (ANAMMOX), fragmentation, sorption, desorption, burial, and leaching. However, only few processes ultimately remove total nitrogen from the wastewater while most processes just convert nitrogen to its various forms. Removal of total nitrogen in studied types of constructed wetlands varied between 40 and 55% with removed load ranging between 250 and 630 g N m(-2) yr(-1) depending on CWs type and inflow loading. However, the processes responsible for the removal differ in magnitude among systems. Single-stage constructed wetlands cannot achieve high removal of total nitrogen due to their inability to provide both aerobic and anaerobic conditions at the same time. Vertical flow constructed wetlands remove successfully ammonia-N but very limited denitrification takes place in these systems. On the other hand, horizontal-flow constructed wetlands provide good conditions for denitrification but the ability of these system to nitrify ammonia is very limited. Therefore, various types of constructed wetlands may be combined with each other in order to exploit the specific advantages of the individual systems. The soil phosphorus cycle is fundamentally different from the N cycle. There are no valency changes during biotic assimilation of inorganic P or during decomposition of organic P by microorganisms. Phosphorus transformations during wastewater treatment in CWs include adsorption, desorption, precipitation, dissolution, plant and microbial uptake, fragmentation, leaching, mineralization, sedimentation (peat accretion) and burial. The major phosphorus removal processes are sorption, precipitation, plant uptake (with subsequent harvest) and peat/soil accretion. However, the first three processes are saturable and soil accretion occurs only in FWS CWs. Removal of phosphorus in all types of constructed wetlands is low unless special substrates with high sorption capacity are used. Removal of total phosphorus varied between 40 and 60% in all types of constructed wetlands with removed load ranging between 45 and 75 g N m(-2) yr(-1) depending on CWs type and inflow loading. Removal of both nitrogen and phosphorus via harvesting of aboveground biomass of emergent vegetation is low but it could be substantial for lightly loaded systems (cca 100-200 g N m(-2) yr(-1) and 10-20 g P m(-2) yr(-1)). Systems with free-floating plants may achieve higher removal of nitrogen via harvesting due to multiple harvesting schedule.

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Topics: Denitrification (62%), Nitrogen cycle (58%), Constructed wetland (56%) ...read more

2,027 Citations


Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/S0048-9697(98)00337-4
Abstract: The recent monitoring of drug residues in the aquatic environment has gained much interest as many pharmaceutical compounds can frequently be found in sewage treatment plant (STP) effluents and river water at concentrations up to several μg/l. This article describes the analysis of various water samples for 18 antibiotic substances, from the classes of macrolid antibiotics, sulfonamides, penicillins and tetracyclines. Samples were preconcentrated via lyophilization and quantified using HPLC-electrospray-tandem-mass spectrometry. The investigated STP effluents and surface water samples showed frequent appearance of an erythromycin degradation product, roxithromycin and sulfamethoxazole with concentrations up to 6 μg/l. Neither tetracyclines nor penicillins could be detected at concentration levels above 50 and 20 ng/l, respectively. From the large number of ground water samples that were taken from agricultural areas in Germany, no contamination by antibiotics was detected except for two sites. This indicates that intake from veterinary applications to the aquatic environment is of minor importance.

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1,958 Citations



Journal ArticleDOI: 10.1016/J.SCITOTENV.2010.08.061
Abstract: Nowadays there is a continuously increasing worldwide concern for development of alternative water reuse technologies, mainly focused on agriculture and industry. In this context, Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) are considered a highly competitive water treatment technology for the removal of those organic pollutants not treatable by conventional techniques due to their high chemical stability and/or low biodegradability. Although chemical oxidation for complete mineralization is usually expensive, its combination with a biological treatment is widely reported to reduce operating costs. This paper reviews recent research combining AOPs (as a pre-treatment or post-treatment stage) and bioremediation technologies for the decontamination of a wide range of synthetic and real industrial wastewater. Special emphasis is also placed on recent studies and large-scale combination schemes developed in Mediterranean countries for non-biodegradable wastewater treatment and reuse. The main conclusions arrived at from the overall assessment of the literature are that more work needs to be done on degradation kinetics and reactor modeling of the combined process, and also dynamics of the initial attack on primary contaminants and intermediate species generation. Furthermore, better economic models must be developed to estimate how the cost of this combined process varies with specific industrial wastewater characteristics, the overall decontamination efficiency and the relative cost of the AOP versus biological treatment.

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1,777 Citations


Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
20221,296
20218,135
20206,940
20196,298
20184,198
20172,843

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Journal's top 5 most impactful authors

Damià Barceló

172 papers, 10.8K citations

Colin Neal

94 papers, 4.7K citations

Michel Benarie

46 papers, 687 citations

Derek C. G. Muir

43 papers, 3.7K citations

Daniel C.W. Tsang

41 papers, 2K citations

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