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JournalISSN: 2641-0397

Sexual and reproductive health matters 

Taylor & Francis
About: Sexual and reproductive health matters is an academic journal published by Taylor & Francis. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Medicine & Reproductive health. It has an ISSN identifier of 2641-0397. It is also open access. Over the lifetime, 127 publications have been published receiving 139 citations. The journal is also known as: SRHM & Sexual & reproductive health matters.

Papers published on a yearly basis

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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The use of abortion services declined, but the use of PAC was more mixed with some studies finding increases compared to pre-COVID-19 levels, and Continued monitoring is needed to assess impacts on these key health services, as the CO VID-19 pandemic evolves.
Abstract: Abstract The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionate effects on people living in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), exacerbating weak health systems. We conducted a scoping review to identify, map, and synthesise studies in LMICs that measured the impact of COVID-19 on demand for, provision of, and access to contraceptive and abortion-related services, and reproductive outcomes of these impacts. Using a pre-established protocol, we searched bibliographic databases (December 2019–February 2021) and key grey literature sources (December 2019–April 2021). Of 71 studies included, the majority (61%) were not peer-reviewed, and 42% were based in Africa, 35% in Asia, 17% were multi-region, and 6% were in Latin America and the Caribbean. Most studies were based on data through June 2020. The magnitude of contraceptive service-related impacts varied widely across 55 studies (24 of which also included information on abortion). Nearly all studies assessing changes over time to contraceptive service provision noted declines of varying magnitude, but severe disruptions were relatively uncommon or of limited duration. Twenty-six studies addressed the impacts of COVID-19 on abortion and postabortion care (PAC). Overall, studies found increases in demand, reductions in provision and increases in barriers to accessing these services. The use of abortion services declined, but the use of PAC was more mixed with some studies finding increases compared to pre-COVID-19 levels. The impacts of COVID-19 varied substantially, including the country context, health service, and population studied. Continued monitoring is needed to assess impacts on these key health services, as the COVID-19 pandemic evolves.

13 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: There is a need for better understanding of the mechanisms, causes and intensions behind male involvement, centring the abortion seeker within this, as well as the conditions under which abortion-seekers are able to access care.
Abstract: Abstract Men’s involvement in abortion is significant, intersecting across the individual, community and macro factors that shape abortion-related care pathways. This scoping review maps the evidence from low- and middle-income countries relating to male involvement in abortion trajectories. Five databases were searched, using search terms, to yield 7493 items published in English between 01.01.2010 and 20.12.2019. 37 items met the inclusion criteria for items relating to male involvement in women’s abortion trajectories and were synthesised using an abortion-related care-seeking framework. The majority of studies were conducted in sub-Saharan Africa and were qualitative. Evidence indicated that male involvement was significant, shaping the ability for a woman or girl to disclose her pregnancy or abortion decision. Men as partners were particularly influential, controlling resources necessary for abortion access and providing or withdrawing support for abortions. Denial or rejection of paternity was a critical juncture in many women’s abortion trajectories. Men’s involvement in abortion trajectories can be both direct and indirect. Contextual realities can make involving men in abortions a necessity, rather than a choice. The impact of male (lack of) involvement undermines the autonomy of a woman or girl to seek an abortion and shapes the conditions under which abortion-seekers are able to access care. This scoping review demonstrates the need for better understanding of the mechanisms, causes and intensions behind male involvement, centring the abortion seeker within this.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article , the authors argue that a necessary precondition to enable women to access health care and justice is to nullify exception 2 to Section 375 of the Indian Penal Code, which exempts rape by the husband from the purview of the rape law.
Abstract: Abstract Sexual violence within marriage is common and manifests in various forms, including marital rape. It has serious physical and mental health consequences and is a violation of women’s sexual and reproductive health rights. Marital rape, reproductive coercion, inserting objects in the vagina or anus, and withholding sexual pleasure are forms of violence routinely experienced by women. Based on service records of survivors coming to public hospitals in an Indian city, this paper presents their pathways to disclosure and institutional responses such as hospitals and police. The findings highlight that a large proportion of survivors of domestic violence confide having experienced forced sexual intercourse by the husband while sharing their experience of physical, economic, and emotional violence with crisis intervention counsellors. However, a small number of women do report marital rape to formal systems like hospitals and police. These systems respond inadequately to women reporting marital rape, as the rape law exempts rape by husband. Sexual violence within marriage can have serious health consequences, and a sensitive healthcare provider can create an enabling environment for disclosing abuse and providing relevant care and support. The paper argues that a necessary precondition to enable women to access health care and justice is to nullify “Exception 2 to Section 375 of the Indian Penal Code” This exception exempts rape by the husband from the purview of the rape law.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A web-based cross-sectional survey among health workers and laypersons found great heterogeneity in knowledge and uptake by type of SRH self-care intervention, indicating that health workers can be better engaged in learning aboutSelf-care SRH interventions and thereby become resources for expanding access.
Abstract: Abstract Self-care interventions hold the potential to improve sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and well-being. Yet key knowledge gaps remain regarding how knowledge and uptake vary across different types of self-care interventions. There is also limited understanding of health workers’ confidence in promoting SRH self-care interventions, and how this may differ based on personal uptake experiences. To address these knowledge gaps, we conducted a web-based cross-sectional survey among health workers and laypersons from July to November 2018. We investigated the following information about SRH self-care interventions: knowledge and uptake; decisions for use; and associations between health workers’ uptake and providing prescriptions, referrals, and/or information for these interventions. Participants (n = 837) included laypersons (n = 477) and health workers (n = 360) from 112 countries, with most representation from the WHO European Region (29.2%), followed by the Americas (28.4%) and African (23.2%) Regions. We found great heterogeneity in knowledge and uptake by type of SRH self-care intervention. Some interventions, such as oral contraception, were widely known in comparison with interventions such as STI self-sampling. Across interventions, participants perceived benefits of privacy, convenience, and accessibility. While pharmacies and doctors were preferred access points, this varied by type of self-care intervention. Health workers with knowledge of the self-care intervention, and who had themselves used the self-care intervention, were significantly more likely to feel confident in, and to have provided information or referrals to, the same intervention. This finding signals that health workers can be better engaged in learning about self-care SRH interventions and thereby become resources for expanding access.

5 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper , the authors conducted 17 interviews and structured surveys with doulas in metro-Atlanta, Georgia, USA from November 2020 to January 2021, and interviews were analyzed in Dedoose using a codebook and memo-ing for thematic analysis.
Abstract: Abstract Doula support improves maternal-child health outcomes. However, during the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitals restricted the number of support people allowed during childbirth. An academic-community research team conducted 17 in-depth interviews and structured surveys with doulas in metro-Atlanta, Georgia, USA from November 2020 to January 2021. Surveys were analysed for descriptive statistics in Stata v. 14, and interviews were analysed in Dedoose using a codebook and memo-ing for thematic analysis. All 17 doulas reported COVID-19 changed their practices: most were unable to accompany clients to delivery (14), started using personal protective equipment (13), used virtual services (12), and had to limit the number of in-person prenatal/postpartum visits (11). Several attended more home births (6) because birthing people were afraid to have their babies in the hospital. Some stopped seeing clients altogether due to safety concerns (2). Many lost clientele who could no longer afford doula services, and some offered pro bono services. Most doulas pointed to restrictive hospital policies that excluded doulas and disallowed virtual support as they felt doulas should be considered a part of the team and clients should not be forced to decide between having their doula or their partner in the room. COVID-19 has severely impacted access to and provision of doula care, mostly due to economic hardship for clients and restrictive hospital policies. At the same time, doulas and their clients have been resourceful – using virtual technology, innovative payment models, and home births.

5 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202346
202281