scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question

Showing papers in "Sociological Inquiry in 2021"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors used data from 1,025 US parents in different-sex partnerships to provide a descriptive overview of changes in mothers and fathers' participation in, and division of, housework and childcare from March 2020 to the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Abstract: Stay-at-home orders and the removal of care and domestic supports during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic substantially disrupted US parents? work and family lives. Although much is known about changes in US parents? paid labor arrangements, the evidence regarding changes in unpaid domestic labor has been largely anecdotal. This study uses novel data from 1,025 US parents in different-sex partnerships to provide a descriptive overview of changes in mothers? and fathers? participation in, and division of, housework and childcare from March 2020 to the early days of the pandemic (late April 2020). Findings show an overall increase in domestic responsibilities for mothers who were already doing most of the household labor. Still, both mothers and fathers report a general shift toward more egalitarian divisions of household labor, driven by increases in fathers? contributions. The shift toward more egalitarian sharing of domestic labor is observed across demographic groups and across types of domestic tasks. Consistent with findings from other countries, egalitarian divisions of domestic labor increased among U.S. parents during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic. Mothers, nonetheless, report retaining primary responsibility for domestic labor in the majority of families.

54 citations



Journal ArticleDOI

39 citations










Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, the authors present a comparative analysis of veterans from the Israeli and British militaries, based on interviews with soldiers who served in both combat and non-combat roles, arguing that soldiers are motivated by, evaluate and perceive their military service through the capitals they acquire during military service which they expect, or not, to convert into the civilian sphere and labor market.
Abstract: Research regarding the ability to convert military resources into valuable social resources (convertibility) focused on the macro-level. These researches examined the influence of various mechanisms on the ability to convert military service into objective rewards in the civilian sphere and labor market. The aim of this research is to focus on a neglected part in the research of convertibility: the micro-level analysis that emphasizes the subjective dimension. We argue that soldiers are motivated by, evaluate and perceive their military service through the capitals they acquire during military service which they expect, or not, to convert into the civilian sphere and labor market. The article presents a comparative analysis of veterans from the Israeli and British militaries, based on interviews with soldiers who served in both combat and non-combat roles.





Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Understanding of how cannabis is viewed by people who are actively misusing opioids and not in treatment is filled, suggesting that for some people struggling with problematic opioid use, cannabis can be beneficial.
Abstract: While states are implementing policies to legalize cannabis for medical or recreational purposes, it remains a Schedule 1 controlled substance with no medical uses according to US federal law. The perception of cannabis depends on social and cultural norms that impact political institutions involved in implementing policy. Because of negative social constructions, such as the "gateway hypothesis," legalization of cannabis has been slow and contentious. Recent studies suggest that cannabis can help combat the opioid epidemic. This paper fills a gap in our understanding of how cannabis is viewed by people who are actively misusing opioids and not in treatment. Using ethnographic methods to recruit participants living in a state that legalized cannabis and a state where cannabis was illegal, survey and interview data were analyzed informed by a social constructionist lens. Findings from their "insider perspective" suggest that for some people struggling with problematic opioid use, cannabis can be beneficial.