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JournalISSN: 1751-9020

Sociology Compass 

Wiley-Blackwell
About: Sociology Compass is an academic journal published by Wiley-Blackwell. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Sociology & Social movement. It has an ISSN identifier of 1751-9020. Over the lifetime, 1411 publications have been published receiving 30026 citations.


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Journal ArticleDOI
Margaret Hunter1
TL;DR: In this article, the authors describe the experiences of African Americans, Latinos, and Asian Americans with regard to skin color and demonstrate that light-skinned people have clear advantages in these areas, even when controlling for other background variables.
Abstract: Colorism is a persistent problem for people of color in the USA Colorism, or skin color stratification, is a process that privileges light-skinned people of color over dark in areas such as income, education, housing, and the marriage market This essay describes the experiences of African Americans, Latinos, and Asian Americans with regard to skin color Research demonstrates that light-skinned people have clear advantages in these areas, even when controlling for other background variables However, dark-skinned people of color are typically regarded as more ethnically authentic or legitimate than light-skinned people Colorism is directly related to the larger system of racism in the USA and around the world The color complex is also exported around the globe, in part through US media images, and helps to sustain the multibillion-dollar skin bleaching and cosmetic surgery industries Racial discrimination is a pervasive problem in the USA African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and other people of color are routinely denied access to resources and fair competition for jobs and schooling Despite this pattern of exclusion, people of color have made great progress in combating persistent discrimination in housing, the labor market, and education However, hidden within the process of racial discrimination is the often overlooked issue of colorism Colorism is the process of discrimination that privileges light-skinned people of color over their dark-skinned counterparts (Hunter 2005) Colorism is concerned with actual skin tone, as opposed to racial or ethnic identity This is an important distinction because race is a social concept, not significantly tied to biology (Hirschman 2004) Lighter-skinned people of color enjoy substantial privileges that are still unattainable to their darker-skinned brothers and sisters In fact, light-skinned people earn more money, complete more years of schooling, live in better neighborhoods, and marry higher-status people than darker-skinned people of the same race or ethnicity (Arce et al 1987; Espino and Franz 2002; Hill 2000; Hughes and Hertel 1990; Hunter 1998, 2005; Keith and Herring 1991; Murguia and Telles 1996; Rondilla and Spickard 2007)

507 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The concept of hybrid masculinities was coined by Demetriou as mentioned in this paper to describe men's selective incorporation of performances and identity elements associated with marginalized and subordinated masculinity and femininities.
Abstract: Hybrid masculinity refers to men’s selective incorporation of performances and identity elementsassociated with marginalized and subordinated masculinities and femininities. We use recent theoriza-tion of hybrid masculinities to critically review theory and research that seeks to make sense of con-temporary transformations in masculinity. We suggest that research broadly supports three distinctconsequences associated with recent changes in performances and politics of masculinity that workto obscure the tenacity of gendered inequality. Hybrid masculinities (i) symbolically distance menfrom hegemonic masculinity; (ii) situate the masculinities available to young, White, heterosexualmen as somehow less meaningful than the masculinities associated with various marginalized andsubordinated Others; and (iii) fortify existing social and symbolic boundaries in ways that often workto conceal systems of power and inequality in historically new ways. IntroductionAgrowingbodyofsociologicaltheoryandresearchonmenandmasculinitiesaddressesrecenttransformations in men’s behaviors, appearances, opinions, and more. While historical re-searchhasshownmasculinitiestobeinacontinuousstateofchange(e.g.,Kimmel1996;Segal1990), the extent of contemporary transformations as well as their impact and meaning is thesource of a great deal of theory, research, and debate. While not a term universally adoptedamong masculinities scholars, the concept of “hybrid masculinities” is a useful way to makesense of this growing body of scholarship. It critically highlights this body of work that seeksto account for the emergence and consequences of recent transformations in masculinities.The term “hybrid” was coined in the natural sciences during the 19th century. Initiallyused to refer to species produced through the mixing of two separate species, by the 20thcentury, it was applied to people and social groups to address popular concern with miscege-nation. Today, scholars in the social sciences and humanities use “hybrid” to address culturalmiscegenation – processes and practices of cultural interpenetration (Burke 2009). “Hybridmasculinities” refer to the selective incorporation of elements of identity typically associatedwith various marginalized and subordinated masculinities and – at times – femininities intoprivileged men’s gender performances and identities (e.g., Arxer 2011; Demetriou 2001;Messerschmidt 2010; Messner 2007). Work on hybrid masculinities has primarily, thoughnot universally, focused on young, White, heterosexual-identified men. This research is cen-trally concerned with the ways that men are increasingly incorporating elements of various“Others” into their identity projects. While it is true that gendered meanings change histor-ically and geographically, research and theory addressing hybrid masculinities are beginningto ask whether recent transformations point in a new, more liberating direction.The transformations addressed by this literature include men’s assimilation of “bits andpieces”(Demetriou2001:350)ofidentityprojectscodedas“gay”(e.g.,Bridges,forthcoming;

459 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that when individuals who are traditionally defined as "consumers" produce exchange value for companies, this does not represent a fundamental change in exchange roles or economic organization, but does represent a change in the traditional roles of "producer" and "consumer".
Abstract: The terms ‘co-creation’, ‘co-production’, and ‘prosumption’ refer to situations in which consumers collaborate with companies or with other consumers to produce things of value. These situations sometimes appear to blur the traditional roles of ‘producer’ and ‘consumer’. Building on Marx’s distinction between ‘use value’ and ‘exchange value’, we argue that, when consumers perform tasks normally handled by the company, this does not necessarily represent a fundamental change in exchange roles or economic organization. We then argue that, when individuals who are traditionally defined as ‘consumers’ produce exchange value for companies, this does represent a fundamental change.

412 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors examines the representation of Islam and Muslims in the British media and suggests that British Muslims are portrayed as an "alien other" within the media and suggest that this misrepresenatation can be linked to the development of a "racism" that has its roots in cultural representations of the "other" in the UK.
Abstract: This article examines the representation of Islam and Muslims in the British press It suggests that British Muslims are portrayed as an ‘alien other’ within the media It suggests that this misrepresenatation can be linked to the development of a ‘racism’, namely, Islamphobia that has its roots in cultural representations of the ‘other’ In order to develop this arguement, the article provies a summary/overview of how ethnic minorities have been represented in the British press and argues that the treatment of British Muslims and Islam follows these themes of ‘deviance’ and ‘un-Britishness’

323 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors provided an overview of existing research on the media framing of climate change, highlighting major research themes and assessing future potential research developments, arguing that analysis of the reporting of climate science must be placed in the wider context of the growing concentration and globalization of news media ownership, and an increasingly "promotional culture", highlighted by the rapid rise of the public relations industry in recent years and claims-makers who employ increasingly sophisticated media strategies.
Abstract: Climate change is one of the most pressing issues of our time, and the media have been demonstrated to play a key role in shaping public perceptions and policy agendas. Journalists are faced with multiple challenges in covering this complex field. This article provides an overview of existing research on the media framing of climate change, highlighting major research themes and assessing future potential research developments. It argues that analysis of the reporting of climate science must be placed in the wider context of the growing concentration and globalization of news media ownership, and an increasingly 'promotional culture', highlighted by the rapid rise of the public relations industry in recent years and claims-makers who employ increasingly sophisticated media strategies. Future research will need to examine in-depth the targeting of media by a range of actors, as well as unravel complex information flows across countries as media increasingly converge.

285 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202359
2022107
202191
202077
201970
201885