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JournalISSN: 1364-5145

Studies in travel writing 

Taylor & Francis
About: Studies in travel writing is an academic journal published by Taylor & Francis. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Narrative & Colonialism. It has an ISSN identifier of 1364-5145. Over the lifetime, 436 publications have been published receiving 1294 citations.
Topics: Narrative, Colonialism, Tourism, Empire, Irish


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Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The authors argue that the ambiguities of Australia's "post-colonial" status can be seen as leading to the development of three distinct traditions of travel writing: Australians writing about the outside world, the outside worlds writing about Australia, and Australia writing about itself.
Abstract: Two broad forces contribute to the shaping of the problematic category, ‘Australian travel writing’. First the ambiguities of Australia's ‘post-colonial’ status can be seen as leading to the development of three distinct traditions of travel writing: Australians writing about the outside world, the outside world writing about Australia, and Australians writing about Australia. But travel writing produced in and about Australia also responds to the pressures of the land itself, where cultures of mobility—‘travelling cultures’—compete with cultures of settlement.

45 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In travel writing, views and gazes express a narrative space from which narrator and reader scrutinise, judge and categorise the varied cultures and societies they explore through writing and reading.
Abstract: Travel writing, in its varied forms and formats, has long been deeply implicated with visual practices. Seeing, looking and gazing are entrenched in the majority of travellers’ narratives. According to Bernard McGrane, “To travel is to see – travel is essentially a way of seeing, a mode of seeing: it is grounded in the eye, in our visual capacity” (1989, 116). Historically, it is above all through seeing that distant places, landscapes, foreign people, animals and objects seem to gain consistency. The gaze is then transferred into the text whether in written or in visual form. In travel writing, views and gazes express a narrative space from which narrator and reader scrutinise, judge and categorise the varied cultures and societies they explore through writing and reading. Illustrations, in particular, come to play a central role in the perception of places and people. For centuries, sketches, watercolours, engravings, lithographs, photography, film and now digital media have framed and recorded every aspect of our movements and experiences of dislocation. They have played a key role in supporting the traveller-observer’s claims of reliability and truthfulness and need “to conjure up the appearances of something that was absent” (Berger 1972, 10). In travel works and related texts, visual images mark an experience as authentic; they confirm that objects, signs and elements (for example, buildings, places, customs and physical features of natives) have been seen. At the same time, any form of visual representation is often less realistic than it seems; it distorts rather than reflects social reality. The process of distortion is itself evidence of specific phenomena: mentalities, ideologies and identities. In other words, pictures testify to the mental and metaphorical “image” of the Self and/or of the Other (Burke 2001, 30–31). The articles presented in this special issue explore how the visual and visuality evoke, engage with and develop travel writing within different geographical zones and historical contexts. The majority of the articles focus on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, when changes in access to both travel and technologies of vision had a significant impact on the relationship of the visual and the verbal in travel writing. Similarly, the final contribution addresses contemporary technological and social change, examining how new media are redefining understandings of both life writing and travel narrative. The relationship between writing and images in travel literature can be conceptualised within an extensive field of enquiry. The relationship between words and pictures, indeed, has been a major focus of semiotic theorists since the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Key theorists such as Charles S. Peirce (1998) and his triad of symbol, icon and index (much employed in the interaction between photography and writing) and

27 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the last two decades of the twentieth century Australia became an attractive travel destination for alienated middle-class Westerners in search of a spiritual utopia as mentioned in this paper, where Aboriginality is represented as a source of spiritual transcendence and as a remedy for the evils of modern consumerism and industrialisation.
Abstract: In the last two decades of the twentieth century Australia became an attractive travel destination for alienated middle-class Westerners in search of a spiritual utopia. In such texts Aboriginality is represented as a source of spiritual transcendence and as a remedy for the evils of modern consumerism and industrialisation. This article examines a number of books by white New Age spiritual travellers–James Cowan's Two Men Dreaming (1995), Marlo Morgan's Mutant Message Down Under (1994), and Harvey Arden's Dreamkeepers (1995)–that claim to (re)discover a lost, universal, sacred heritage within Aboriginal cosmologies. The discourses employed by recent Australian New Age travel texts are prima facie examples of postcolonial forms of cultural appropriation. Yet the involvement of indigenous agents in the production, promotion, and critique of such texts complicates the argument that these texts are simply new forms of cultural colonisation.

18 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
20232
20227
20216
202026
201923
201829