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JournalISSN: 0280-6495

Tellus A 

Wiley-Blackwell
About: Tellus A is an academic journal published by Wiley-Blackwell. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Data assimilation & Baroclinity. It has an ISSN identifier of 0280-6495. It is also open access. Over the lifetime, 4014 publications have been published receiving 161641 citations. The journal is also known as: Tellus. Series A: Dynamic Meteorology and Oceanography & Tellus: Series A, Dynamic Meteorology and Oceanography.


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Journal ArticleDOI
01 Nov 1964-Tellus A
TL;DR: In this paper, the isotopic fractionation of water in simple condensation-evaporation processes is considered quantitatively on the basis of the fractionation factors given in section 1.2.
Abstract: In chapter 2 the isotopic fractionation of water in some simple condensation-evaporation processes are considered quantitatively on the basis of the fractionation factors given in section 1.2. The condensation temperature is an important parameter, which has got some glaciological applications. The temperature effect (the δ's decreasing with temperature) together with varying evaporation and exchange appear in the “amount effect” as high δ's in sparse rain. The relative deuterium-oxygen-18 fractionation is not quite simple. If the relative deviations from the standard water (S.M.O.W.) are called δ D and δ 18 , the best linear approximation is δ D = 8 δ 18 . Chapter 3 gives some qualitative considerations on non-equilibrium (fast) processes. Kinetic effects have heavy bearings upon the effective fractionation factors. Such effects have only been demonstrated clearly in evaporation processes, but may also influence condensation processes. The quantity d = δ D −8 δ 18 is used as an index for non-equilibrium conditions. The stable isotope data from the world wide I.A.E.A.-W.M.O. precipitation survey are discussed in chapter 4. The unweighted mean annual composition of rain at tropical island stations fits the line δ D = 4.6 δ 18 indicating a first stage equilibrium condensation from vapour evaporated in a non-equilibrium process. Regional characteristics appear in the weighted means. The Northern hemisphere continental stations, except African and Near East, fit the line δ D = 8.0 δ 18 + 10 as far as the weighted means are concerned (δ D = 8.1 δ 18 + 11 for the unweighted) corresponding to an equilibrium Rayleigh condensation from vapour, evaporated in a non-equilibrium process from S.M.O.W. The departure from equilibrium vapour seems even higher in the rest of the investigated part of the world. At most stations the δ D and varies linearily with δ 18 with a slope close to 8, only at two stations higher than 8, at several lower than 8 (mainly connected with relatively dry climates). Considerable variations in the isotopic composition of monthly precipitation occur at most stations. At low latitudes the amount effect accounts for the variations, whereas seasonal variation at high latitudes is ascribed to the temperature effect. Tokyo is an example of a mid latitude station influenced by both effects. Some possible hydrological applications are outlined in chapter 5. DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1964.tb00181.x

7,081 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Aug 1949-Tellus A
TL;DR: In this paper, it was shown that a simple state of steady baroclinic large-scale atmospheric motion is almost invariably unstable, and that such states of motion can be represented by components of a certain simple type, some of which grow exponentially with time.
Abstract: By obtaining complete solutions, satisfying all the relevant simultaneous differential equations and boundary conditions, representing small disturbances of simple states of steady baroclinic large-scale atmospheric motion it is shown that these simple states of motion are almost invariably unstable. An arbitrary disturbance (corresponding to some inhomogeneity of an actual system) may be regarded as analysed into “components” of a certain simple type, some of which grow exponentially with time. In all the cases examined there exists one particular component which grows faster than any other. It is shown how, by a process analogous to “natural selection”, this component becomes dominant in that almost any disturbance tends eventually to a definite size, structure and growth-rate (and to a characteristic life-history after the disturbance has ceased to be “small”), which depends only on the broad characteristics of the initial (unperturbed) system. The characteristic disturbances (forms of breakdown) of certain types of initial system (approximating to those observed in practice) are identified as the ideal forms of the observed cyclonc waves and long waves of middle and high latitudes. The implications regarding the ultimate limitations of weather forecasting are discussed. DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1949.tb01265.x

1,609 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Dec 1976-Tellus A
TL;DR: In this article, a stochastic model of climate variability is considered in which slow changes of climate are explained as the integral response to continuous random excitation by short period "weather" disturbances.
Abstract: A stochastic model of climate variability is considered in which slow changes of climate are explained as the integral response to continuous random excitation by short period “weather” disturbances. The coupled ocean-atmosphere-cryosphere-land system is divided into a rapidly varying “weather” system (essentially the atmosphere) and a slowly responding “climate” system (the ocean, cryosphere, land vegetation, etc.). In the usual Statistical Dynamical Model (SDM) only the average transport effects of the rapidly varying weather components are parameterised in the climate system. The resultant prognostic equations are deterministic, and climate variability can normally arise only through variable external conditions. The essential feature of stochastic climate models is that the non-averaged “weather” components are also retained. They appear formally as random forcing terms. The climate system, acting as an integrator of this short-period excitation, exhibits the same random-walk response characteristics as large particles interacting with an ensemble of much smaller particles in the analogous Brownian motion problem. The model predicts “red” variance spectra, in qualitative agreement with observations. The evolution of the climate probability distribution is described by a Fokker-Planck equation, in which the effect of the random weather excitation is represented by diffusion terms. Without stabilising feedback, the model predicts a continuous increase in climate variability, in analogy with the continuous, unbounded dispersion of particles in Brownian motion (or in a homogeneous turbulent fluid). Stabilising feedback yields a statistically stationary climate probability distribution. Feedback also results in a finite degree of climate predictability, but for a stationary climate the predictability is limited to maximal skill parameters of order 0.5. DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1976.tb00696.x

1,586 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Mar 1986-Tellus A
TL;DR: In this paper, two general algorithms for solving constrained minimization problems are presented and discussed in the context of analysis and assimilation of meteorological observations, in particular in terms of their computational cost.
Abstract: Two general algorithms for solving constrained minimization problems are presented and discussed in the context of analysis and assimilation of meteorological observations. In both algorithms, the original constrained problem is transformed by appropriate modifications into one unconstrained problem, or into a sequence of unconstrained problems. The main advantage of proceeding in this way is that the new unconstrained problems can be solved by classical descent algorithms, thus avoiding the need of directly solving the Euler-Lagrange equations of the original constrained problem. The first algorithm presented in the augmented lagrangian algorithm. It generalizes the more classical penalty and duality algorithms. The second algorithm, inspired from optimal control techniques, is based on an appropriate use of an adjoint dynamical equation, and seems to be particularly well adapted to the assimilation of observations distributed in time. Simple numerical examples show the ability of these algorithms to solve non-linear minimization problems of the type encountered in meteorology. Their possible use in more complex situations is discussed, in particular in terms of their computational cost. DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0870.1986.tb00459.x

1,572 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
01 Oct 1969-Tellus A
TL;DR: In this article, the influence of long-term changes of radiation caused by variations of atmospheric transparency on the thermal regime is studied, and it is found that comparatively small variations in atmospheric transparency could be sufficient for the development of quaternary glaciations.
Abstract: It follows from the analysis of observation data that the secular variation of the mean temperature of the Earth can be explained by the variation of short-wave radiation, arriving at the surface of the Earth. In connection with this, the influence of long-term changes of radiation, caused by variations of atmospheric transparency on the thermal regime is being studied. Taking into account the influence of changes of planetary albedo of the Earth under the development of glaciations on the thermal regime, it is found that comparatively small variations of atmospheric transparency could be sufficient for the development of quaternary glaciations. DOI: 10.1111/j.2153-3490.1969.tb00466.x

1,366 citations

Performance
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No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202311
202225
202123
202023
201932
201815