scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question

Showing papers in "The American Historical Review in 1989"


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The David Woodward Memorial Fellowship in the History of Cartography as discussed by the authors provides scholars with an opportunity to research and write on a subject related to the history of cartography in a stimulating academic environment.
Abstract: The Institute for Research in the Humanities (http://irh.wisc.edu) and the History of Cartography Project (http://www.geography.wisc.edu/histcart), at the University of Wisconsin–Madison (UW), hold an annual competition for the David Woodward Memorial Fellowship in the History of Cartography. The fellowship gives scholars an opportunity to research and write on a subject related to the history of cartography in a stimulating academic environment. Proposals should complement one of the forthcoming volumes of The History of Cartography. It is preferred that the 2014-2015 fellow will focus on under-studied topics in nineteenth-century cartography (related to Volume Five of The History of Cartography), but this is not required and the choice of subject matter is otherwise open. Fellows are provided with office space (when available) and access to all UW–Madison libraries and campus facilities. Participation in the lively, interdisciplinary community of the Institute is strongly encouraged.

321 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, an engaging study of courtship shows that at least half the fun of reading about getting there is in reading about how to get there, rather than the journey itself.
Abstract: "Whether or not we've come a long way since then, this engaging study of courtship shows that at least half the fun is in reading about getting there." -- St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

254 citations




Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A history of private life in ancient Rome, Byzantium, and Western Europe in the early Middle Ages is described in this article, where the hidden history of intimate life in the ancient world is illuminated.
Abstract: from Harvard University Press U A History of Private Life Philippe Aries and George Duby, General Editors Volume I: From Pagan Rome to Byzantium Edited by Paul Veyne Translated by Arthur Goldhammer First of a handsome new series, this book illuminates the L hidden history of intimate life in the ancient world, presenting an intriguing picture of individual and social behavlior in ancient Rome, Byzantium, and Western Europe in the early Middle Ages. Belknap $29.50 t

183 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, what is propaganda and how does it differ from persuasion, and how propaganda can be distinguished from persuasion and psychological warfare, as well as how propaganda works in modern society.
Abstract: Preface to the First Edition Preface to the Second Edition Preface to the Third Edition Preface to the Fourth Edition Chapter 1: What Is Propaganda, and How Does It Differ From Persuasion? Chapter 2: Propaganda Through the Ages Chapter 3: Propaganda Institutionalized Chapter 4: Propaganda and Persuasion Examined Chapter 5: Propaganda and Psychological Warfare Chapter 6: How to Analyze Propaganda Chatper 7: Propaganda in Action: Four Case Studies Chapter 8: How Propaganda Works in Modern Society

177 citations



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, Schama investigates the astonishing case of a people's self-invention and shows how, in the 17th-century, a modest assortment of farming, fishing and shipping communities, without a shared language, religion or government, transformed themselves into a formidable world empire.
Abstract: This is the book that made Simon Schama's reputation when first published in 1987 A historical masterpiece, it is an epic account of Dutch Culture in the Golden Age of Rembrandt and van Diemen In this brilliant work that moves far beyond the conventions of social or cultural history, Simon Schama investigates the astonishing case of a people's self-invention He shows how, in the 17th-century, a modest assortment of farming, fishing and shipping communities, without a shared language, religion or government, transformed themselves into a formidable world empire - the Dutch republic

151 citations


BookDOI
TL;DR: In this article, a study of the postwar automation of the American metal-working industry, the heart of a modern industrial economy, explains how dominant institutions like the great corporations, the universities and the military, along with the ideology of modern engineering shape, the development of technology.
Abstract: Focusing on the design and implementation of computer-based automatic machine tools, David F. Noble challenges the idea that technology has a life of its own. Technology has been both a convenient scapegoat and a universal solution, serving to disarm critics, divert attention, depoliticize debate, and dismiss discussion of the fundamental antagonisms and inequalities that continue to beset America. This provocative study of the postwar automation of the American metal-working industry—the heart of a modern industrial economy—explains how dominant institutions like the great corporations, the universities, and the military, along with the ideology of modern engineering shape, the development of technology.Noble shows how the system of "numerical control," perfected at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and put into general industrial use, was chosen over competing systems for reasons other than the technical and economic superiority typically advanced by its promoters. Numerical control took shape at an MIT laboratory rather than in a manufacturing setting, and a market for the new technology was created, not by cost-minded producers, but instead by the U. S. Air Force. Competing methods, equally promising, were rejected because they left control of production in the hands of skilled workers, rather than in those of management or programmers.Noble demonstrates that engineering design is influenced by political, economic, managerial, and sociological considerations, while the deployment of equipment—illustrated by a detailed case history of a large General Electric plant in Massachusetts—can become entangled with such matters as labor classification, shop organization, managerial responsibility, and patterns of authority. In its examination of technology as a human, social process, Forces of Production is a path-breaking contribution to the understanding of this phenomenon in American society.

148 citations



BookDOI
TL;DR: The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press as mentioned in this paper.
Abstract: This book combines the tools of political science, sociology, and labor history to offer a wide-ranging analysis of how unions have participated in politics in Britain, Germany, and the United States. Rather than focus exclusively on national union federations, Gary Marks investigates variations among individual unions both within and across these countries. By examining the individual unions that make up union movements, he probes beyond national descriptions of British laborism, German socialism, and American business unionism while bringing the analysis closer to the actual experiences of people who joined labor organizations.Among the topics Marks examines are state repression of unions, the Organizational Revolution, the contrasting experiences of printing and coalmining unions, and American Exceptionalism.Originally published in 1989.The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: This article used evidence from surviving student cahiers and professional textbooks to recreate the educational experience of the French professional classes in the age of absolutism, and found that the experience was similar to that of the American student.
Abstract: This study uses evidence from surviving student cahiers and professional textbooks to recreate the educational experience of the French professional classes in the age of absolutism.











Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A Whole New Ball Game as discussed by the authors traces the development of modern sports in America from the rituals of pre-Columbian cultures to the late-1980s in this book, Guttmann discusses the failure of colonial New England and the antebellum South to influence the evolution of sports.
Abstract: Sports in America, particularly big-time collegiate and professional sports, have never been more popular. Modern sports events bring us breathtaking demonstrations of grace and power and provide the focal point for the leisure time of hundreds of thousands of Americans. But the world of sports is also increasingly a scene of moral corruption and physical abuse. In A Whole New Ball Game , Allen Guttmann examines the American fascination with sport and what that fascination reveals about our culture. Like the transformation of American society in the twentieth century, the modernization of American sports has seemed inevitable and ubiquitous. As Guttmann shows, American sports reflect American culture: our sports are secular, bureaucratic, and specialized, and as part of our democratic society, they require at least in theory an equality among competitors. The rules of modern sports reflect their evolution from earlier, less differentiated games. To master the skills required by modern sports, athletes train scientifically, employing the most technologically advanced equipment. And, like almost every other aspect of our lives, sports are quantified: our athletes and the media are almost obsessed with records. In tracing the development of modern sports in America from the rituals of pre-Columbian cultures to the late-1980s in this book, Guttmann discusses the failure of colonial New England and the antebellum South to influence the evolution of sports. He shows how baseball, a sport that combines premodern and modern characteristics, performed important social functions, helping to Americanize generations of immigrants. Examining basketball as the archetypal modern sport, Guttmann discusses its invention in the YMCA and its vulnerablity to corruption by gamblers, and he provocatively reviews the transformation of informal chlidren's play into adult-sponsored leagues. One chapter of this important study offers and engrossing account of the female athletes's transition from social outcast to superstar; another scrutinizes the failure to achieve racial equality in sports. Guttmann also presents a scathing analysis of the destruction of the athlete's body through drug use and an examination of the search for alternative forms of physical activity. A Whole New Ball Game demonstrates conclusively that sports are an integral part of modern society and that, taken as a whole, they may be the best indicators we have of who we are as a people.


MonographDOI
TL;DR: Power, Protection, and Free Trade as discussed by the authors offers an alternative, systemic approach to trade strategy that builds on the interaction between domestic and international factors, arguing that both protection and free trade are legitimate and effective instruments of national policy, the considered responses of nations to varying international structures.
Abstract: Why do nations so frequently abandon unrestricted international commerce in favor of trade protectionism? David A. Lake contends that the dominant explanation, interest group theory, does not adequately explain American trade strategy or address the contradictory elements of cooperation and conflict that shape the international economy. Power, Protection, and Free Trade offers an alternative, systemic approach to trade strategy that builds on the interaction between domestic and international factors. In this innovative book, Lake maintains that both protection and free trade are legitimate and effective instruments of national policy, the considered responses of nations to varying international structures.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In the early 1950s, the United States and the Soviet Union possessed sufficient numbers of sufficiently powerful and deliverable nuclear weapons to threaten each other's existence as discussed by the authors, and the impact of the approach of Armageddon on the leadership of Soviet society remains largely a matter of conjecture; despite glasnost, the keepers of the Kremlin's secrets appear unlikely in the near future to lay open their records on nuclear and national security planning during the 1950s.
Abstract: ALTHOUGH 1945 TRADITIONALLY MARKS THE BEGINNING of the nuclear era in international affairs, not until more than a decade later did the United States and the Soviet Union possess sufficient numbers of sufficiently powerful and deliverable weapons to threaten each other's existence. The impact of the approach of Armageddon on the leadership of Soviet society remains largely a matter of conjecture; despite glasnost, the keepers of the Kremlin's secrets appear unlikely in the near future to lay open their records on nuclear and national-security planning during the 1950s. While access to American documents is not what it should be, enough material has become available during the past few years to allow a relatively thorough reconstruction of the manner in which American policy makers, most notably in the administration of Dwight D. Eisenhower, tackled the problems that have vexed American national-security planning ever since: how to integrate nuclear weapons into overall defense strategy, how to defend the United States against an opponent armed with such weapons, and how to balance economic health against military strength.' The documents tell a story with two themes. The first, having implications primarily for the historiography of the period, involves the process of policy making during the 1950s. The Eisenhower to whom we have recently been reintroduced-the masterful chief executive, knowledgeable about the issues and firmly in command of his administration-makes occasional appearances here; but equally often we see a president slow to realize the import of the revolutionary changes confronting America and unable to control the bureaucracy that made policy in his name. The result was administrative confusion, at times approaching paralysis.2

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The colonial question has received remarkably little attention from scholars of the French Revolution as discussed by the authors, and it is difficult to understand that effort without reference to developments in the colonies, as well as to the contemporary debate about the limits of metropolitan control and the threat of white secessionism within the empire.
Abstract: THE COLONIAL QUESTION IN THE FRENCH REVOLUTION involved three broad issues: self-government for France's overseas possessions, civil rights for their free colored populations, and the abolition of the slave trade and slavery itself. This article is primarily concerned with the pursuit in France of racial equality and slave emancipation, but it is difficult to understand that effort without reference to developments in the colonies, as well as to the contemporary debate about the limits of metropolitan control and the threat of white secessionism within the empire. ' Indeed, one of the chief interests of the colonial question lies in the interaction of its three component issues and the complex counterpoint that developed between events in Europe and the Caribbean. Until recently, the colonial question has received remarkably little attention from scholars of the French Revolution. As Mitchell Garrett observed in 1916, historians have been less interested in French attitudes toward the colonies during the revolutionary period than in the colonies themselves.2 The abolition of slavery in 1794, surely one of the most radical acts of the entire revolution, gets no mention in the classic studies of Jules Michelet, Jean Jaures, Albert Mathiez, and Albert Soboul, nor in the recent histories of George Rude, D. M. G. Sutherland, and Simon Schama.3 Matters of empire, race, and slavery fail to appear in the documentary collections of J. M. Roberts and John Hardman, or in such different works as those of Peter Kropotkin, Pierre Gaxotte, and (barring a misleading half-sentence) Alexis de Tocqueville.4 Even