scispace - formally typeset
Search or ask a question
JournalISSN: 0969-4900

The British Journal of Midwifery 

Mark Allen Group
About: The British Journal of Midwifery is an academic journal published by Mark Allen Group. The journal publishes majorly in the area(s): Pregnancy & Breastfeeding. It has an ISSN identifier of 0969-4900. Over the lifetime, 3819 publications have been published receiving 19889 citations. The journal is also known as: BJM.


Papers
More filters
Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: It is important to keep in touch with what is happening and to ensure that discussion about the maternity services happens at an appropriate stage and indeed that maternity services are on the ‘agenda’.
Abstract: The Government's White Paper ‘The new NHS’ was only published in December 1997, so discussions about the future shape of our health services are still at an early stage. However, it is important to keep in touch with what is happening and to ensure that discussion about the maternity services happens at an appropriate stage and indeed that maternity services are on the ‘agenda.’ I am sure that most midwives feel confident that their own Head of Midwifery will be participating in discussions and will be consulted about future change.

922 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The judicial services often seem to view these women with suspicion and contempt as discussed by the authors, but the judicial services can be viewed with contempt because they are subordinated and patriarchy appear to be the root of violence against wives.
Abstract: Subordination and patriarchy appear to be the root of violence against wives (Dobash and Dobash, 1979), but the judicial services often seem to view these women with suspicion and contempt. As many as one in 50 pregnant women may be battered, therefore midwives need to be able to detect the signs and symptoms in order to offer them support and advice.

214 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Quantitative and qualitative approaches to research are two distinct ways of conducting midwifery research and how they can be useful to the midwife is outlined.
Abstract: Quantitative and qualitative approaches to research are two distinct ways of conducting midwifery research. This article outlines the differences between the two and shows how they can be useful to the midwife. A third option of combining the two in a single project is suggested as a way of gaining the best from each alternative.

213 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this article, the use of phenomenology as a research method which is to fully describe a person's lived experience of an event or experience is discussed, stressing that only those that have experienced phenomena can communicate them to the outside world.
Abstract: This article details the use of Phenomenology as a research method which is to fully describe a person's lived experience of an event or experience. It stresses that only those that have experienced phenomena can communicate them to the outside world. It therefore provides an understanding of an experience from those who have lived it. The two schools of phenomenology which are described are utilized in both midwifery and nursing research. These are Husserlian and Heideggerian (Hermeneutics) phenomenology. The main focus in this article, however, is on the Husserlian approach, its background, data collection, data analysis methods and its application to midwifery research.

207 citations

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: Three key themes emerged from the data relating to sustainable practice, the avoidance of burnout and the provision of flexible woman-centred care were occupational autonomy, social support and developing meaningful relationships with women.
Abstract: This study aimed to examine the impact of Changing Childbirth (Department of Health, 1993) on midwives' work and personal lives. It reports findings from a multiple site case study of community-based maternity care. Each site represented a model of continuity of carer along a continuum from complete one-to-one continuity to continuity within a team. The three sites represented the traditional model of GP-attached community midwives, a community team and a community-based group practice. Three key themes emerged from the data relating to sustainable practice, the avoidance of burnout and the provision of flexible woman-centred care. These were occupational autonomy, social support and developing meaningful relationships with women. Control over work and continuity of care are as important to midwives in how well they balance their work and home life as they are to women experiencing childbirth. Models of care such as personal caseloads that incorporate these factors may be more sustainable in terms of less...

162 citations

Performance
Metrics
No. of papers from the Journal in previous years
YearPapers
202360
2022113
202186
2020109
2019129
2018128