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Showing papers in "The Economic History Review in 1989"



Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The death of the 19th century, the world made by and for liberal middle classes in the name of universal progress and civilization, is discussed in this article, where the author describes a "death" of the middle classes of the United States.
Abstract: This title is about the death of the 19th century, the world made by and for liberal middle classes in the name of universal progress and civilization. It is about hopes realized which turned into fears: an era of unparalled peace engendering an era of unparalled war; revolt and revolution inevitably emerging on the outskirts of a stable and flourishing Western society; an era of profound identity crises for bourgeois classes whose traditional moral foundations crumbled under the pressure of their own accumulations of wealth and comfort, among a new and sudden mass labour movement which rejected capitalism, new middle classes which rejected liberalism. It is about world empires built and held with almost contemptuous ease by small bodies of Europeans, which were to last barely a human lifetime, and a European domination of world history never more confident than at the moment when it was about to disappear forever.

680 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A full-scale study of the history of money, not merely of coinage, to have been written for medieval Europe can be found in this article, where a detailed picture of the many and changing roles played by money in all its forms, in all parts of Europe throughout the Middle Ages.
Abstract: This is a full-scale study of the history of money, not merely of coinage, to have been written for medieval Europe. The book is not limited to one country, or to any one period or theme, but extracts the most important elements for the historian across the broadest possible canvas. Its scope extends from the mining of precious metals on the one hand, to banking, including the use of cheques and bills of exchange, on the other. Chapters are arranged chronologically, rather than regionally or thematically, and offer a detailed picture of the many and changing roles played by money, in all its forms, in all parts of Europe throughout the Middle Ages. Thus money is seen as having differing values for differing parts of individual societies. The book shows money moving and changing as a result of war and trade and other political, economic and ecclesiastical activities without regard for national barriers or the supposed separation between 'East' and 'West'.

295 citations


Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The problem of locating a bon vieux temps when women enjoyed a harmonious, if hard-working, domestic role and social responsibility before they were downgraded into social parasites or factory fodder under the corrupting hand of capitalism has proved remarkably elusive.
Abstract: One problem for the early modernist is that feminist writing on the nineteenth century has tended to force upon historians of the early modern period an unenviable task, that of locating a bon vieux temps when women enjoyed a harmonious, if hard-working, domestic role and social responsibility before they were downgraded into social parasites or factory fodder under the corrupting hand of capitalism. So far the location of this bon vieux temps has proved remarkably elusive.2

155 citations









Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: A history of the influential bank examines changes in its management, competition with other banks, changing federal and state policies, and long-range planning decisions as mentioned in this paper. But it does not discuss the role of women in the bank's management.
Abstract: A history of the influential bank examines changes in its management, competition with other banks, changing federal and state policies, and long-range planning decisions.


BookDOI
TL;DR: Eichengreen and McLean as mentioned in this paper described the Australian recovery of the 1930s in international comparative perspective using a macro-econometric model of the interwar economy and showed that the distributional aspects of depression and recovery in Australia were unequal.
Abstract: List of authors List of figures List of tables Preface 1. An overview R. G. Gregory 2. The Australian recovery of the 1930s in international comparative perspective Barry Eichengreen 3. The recovery of the 1930s and economic policy in Britain T. J. Hatton 4. A macro interpretation of recovery: Australia and Canada Alan G. Green and Gordon R. Sparks 5. Depression and recovery in New Zealand G. R. Hawke 6. The Japanese economy and economic policy in the 1930s Tasukichi Yasuba 7. The battle of the plans: a macroeconometric model of the interwar economy T. J. Valentine 8. Australian budgetary policies in the 1930s J. J. Pincus 9. Monetary policy in depression and recovery M. W. Butlin and P. M. Boyce 10. Sharing the burden: the Australian labour market during the 1930s R. C. Gregory, V. Ho and L. McDermott 11. Manufacturing and economic recovery in Australia, 1932-1937 Mark Thomas 12. Agriculture and the recovery from the depression B. R. Davidson 13. Unemployment and the Australian economic recovery of the 1930s C. Forster 14. Government unemployment relief in the 1930s: aid or hindrance to recovery? G. D. Snooks 15. Unequal sacrifice: distributional aspects of depression and recovery in Australia Ian W. McLean References Index.

Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: In this paper, a collection of essays by eminent historians in the field, seeks to present a history of Indian Ocean as seen from maritime India and built around the commerce of the Indian Ocean.
Abstract: This collection of essays by eminent historians in the field, seeks to present a history of the Indian Ocean as seen from maritime India and built around the commerce of the Indian Ocean.







Journal ArticleDOI
TL;DR: The rise of metropolitan markets commercial credit the rise of the inland bill of exchange the bill on London the ''price revolution'' as discussed by the authors was described as a "price revolution" in financial markets.
Abstract: The rise of metropolitan markets commercial credit the rise of the inland bill of exchange the bill on London the \"price revolution\".